Apple's iPhone repair tool kit that it rents is wheeled and weighs 79 pounds

Posted:
in iPhone edited April 27
Apple hasn't exactly skimped on the tools it provides in its new iPhone Self Service Repair program, but at 79 pounds, it's not what you'd call a practical kit for home use.




Even before it launched its new Self Service Repair program, Apple was accused of doing it less to help users, and more to head off future legislation. Now it's launched the program, it can tell any court in the land that it is providing every possible tool -- and doing so for a $49/week rental fee, including shipping.

Only, that isn't $49 per week for however long you need to study the 80+ pages of repair manuals available on the new service site. It is $49 for one week and only one week -- or in practice, probably not quite even that.

Instead, you have to drop the kit off at a UPS store "by day 7." If you fail to do so, "you will be charged a fee and a tax," though Apple does not specify how much that will amount to.

It does say that at point of rental, it will put a temporary authorization on your credit card to cover the full replacement value of the tools. Again, Apple does not say how much that is -- partly because it varies, there are customized repair toolkits for different models.

Confusingly, Apple's listings for the different toolkits don't entirely tally with its listings for each tool you can buy separately. There are some in the kit that don't appear to be listed separately, while there are some separate ones that are not in the kit.

However, counting only the tools that are present in the iPhone SE toolkit -- the smallest kit available -- then the kit's contents are worth around $914. For all other iPhone models available, the second case adds about $364, for a total on your credit card of $1,278.

Note that the kit costs the same, and has the same tools, whether you want the tools to replace a battery or fix the speaker. So if you're on a low income, a tight budget, and figured this was a way to fix your iPhone cheaply, then it probably isn't.

It's also not in any possible way a straightforward job. And if the severe warnings throughout the documentation don't put you off, the toolkit cases might.

The iPhone SE toolkit comes in one case, where all of the other iPhones in the program get a two-case kit instead. The case you get for the iPhone SE contains:
  • Battery press

  • Display Press

  • 4.7-inch Repair Tray

  • Adhesive Cutter

  • Nylon Probe (Black Stick)

  • 4.7-inch Display Protective Cover

  • 4.7-inch Back Protective Cover

  • Black Torque Driver Kit

  • Gray Torque Driver

  • Green Torque Driver

  • Blue Torque Driver

  • Micro Stix Bit

  • Super screw Bit

  • 4.7-inch Support Frame

  • Universal Display Fixture
Every iPhone repair toolkit, regardless of the model, comes with a case containing these tools. Except for the iPhone SE, all of the rest have a case that adds:

  • Heated Display Removal Fixture

  • Heated Display Pocket

Apple says that, "one case weighs 43 pounds and the other weighs 36 pounds."

That's a total weight of 79 pounds. As an iPhone SE weighs only 5.09 ounces, that means to repair it you need a kit that weighs just over 248 times more than the phone you're trying to fix.

The toolkits come on wheels, and they can also be stacked. If your iPhone needs two toolkits, and you stack them together, they add up to 20 inches wide and 47 inches high.

Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

Read on AppleInsider
«13

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 45
    amar99amar99 Posts: 108member
    One complaint leads to another, what's new? It's a high-precision product, requiring specialized tools to repair.
    Graeme000StrangeDayssocalbrianforegoneconclusionrepressthisbaconstangstompythtradarthekatpichael
  • Reply 2 of 45
    amar99 said:
    One complaint leads to another, what's new? It's a high-precision product, requiring specialized tools to repair.
    I agree. This article seems very whiny. The cost of the parts seems very reasonable and if you don’t have the tools, then you rent them. I don’t see an issue with the setup. 
    StrangeDayssocalbrianforegoneconclusionrepressthisbaconstangstompythtviclauyycradarthekatpichael
  • Reply 3 of 45
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,027member
    Trust Apple to make it way more complicated than it needs to be.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 4 of 45
    Waiting for the Mac’s tool kit, may need the user rent a van, temporary authorization on credit card . XD.
    muthuk_vanalingamrepressthisviclauyyc
  • Reply 5 of 45
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,989member
    I don't think Apple had any intention that its repair program be geared toward the DIY home repair crowd. I don’t know why the tech gear heads thought it would be. This program is clearly for registered third party repair shops that do a volume business. If the DIY’ers want to they can rent the kit for a day and do their thing. What’s the problem?
    StrangeDaysrepressthisbaconstangthtviclauyycradarthekatwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 6 of 45
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,989member

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    edited April 27 StrangeDayssocalbrianrepressthisbaconstangviclauyycradarthekatAppleSince1976watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 7 of 45
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,027member
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    MplsP
  • Reply 8 of 45
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 139member
    The big deal here is that independent third party repair shops can now buy the tools needed to repair iPhones.

    The big change is not that individuals will be fixing their own phones, but that Apple no longer strictly limits the locations that can reasonably repair an iPhone.
    socalbriansdw2001baconstangthtwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 9 of 45
    Obviously no one works on their own cars where you can:

    1) whip up a tool from what you have around the garage for free
    2) buy/rent the off-brand gadget that handles a few different situations on various similar cars
    3) pay hundreds/thousands for the specific tool listed in the manufacturer's official repair manual for one specific step in one specific procedure. The tool has been third-party certified under 9 different engineering standards.
    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 45
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,010member
    crowley said:
    Trust Apple to make it way more complicated than it needs to be.
    These are insanely sophisticated computers in our pockets. They are exactly as complicated as they need to be. It's not a car stereo install.

    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    You seem confused. Or you're deliberately deploying a straw man since literally no one said that except you. These devices are already repairable and there are countless repair outlets to choose from: Apple's, authorized third parties, and unauthorized third parties. The point that these devices aren't designed for your grandson to fix for fun has zilch to do w/ the question of whether they're repairable. They most certainly are and always have been.

    Personally my own days of doing DIY smartphone repairs are over, after having done a few. Like my car, I prefer to simply leave it to a pro.
    edited April 27 socalbrianwilliamlondonrepressthisbaconstangbadmonk13485radarthekatpichaelAppleSince1976watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 45
    emoelleremoeller Posts: 541member
    I've been doing my own repairs on Apple products since 1978!   iFixit has some excellent tools and entire kits that I use for much more than just repairing Apple's products.   All that said, some repairs simply should not be attempted at home and usually major repairs for older models really aren't worth the time and effort - especially when newer models have significantly improved hardware and software.
    repressthisstompyAppleSince1976watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 12 of 45
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,989member
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    By themselves, of course. The DIY crowd is its-bitsy teeny-weeny but screams louder than its size.
    williamlondonrepressthisradarthekatAppleSince1976watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 13 of 45
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,027member
    lkrupp said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    By themselves, of course. The DIY crowd is its-bitsy teeny-weeny but screams louder than its size.
    But that’s not what you’ve quoted says.  You’ve got to get over this misconception that right to repair is about every user being a tinkerer. It isn’t. It’s about every user have access to repair services, and not just Apple Stores.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 45
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,027member
    crowley said:
    Trust Apple to make it way more complicated than it needs to be.
    These are insanely sophisticated computers in our pockets. They are exactly as complicated as they 
    need to be. It's not a car stereo install.
    Never said it was. I am of course referring to the pricing and rental arrangements that are more complicated than they need to be.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 15 of 45
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,027member
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    You seem confused. Or you're deliberately deploying a straw man since literally no one said that except you. These devices are already repairable and there are countless repair outlets to choose from: Apple's, authorized third parties, and unauthorized third parties. The point that these devices aren't designed for your grandson to fix for fun has zilch to do w/ the question of whether they're repairable. They most certainly are and always have been.
    Not sure why you’re saying I’m confused and deploying a straw man when you are rebutting lkrupp, the person who I quoted and was responding to. Yes, lkrupp literally said what you are saying literally no one has said.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 16 of 45
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    You seem confused. Or you're deliberately deploying a straw man since literally no one said that except you. These devices are already repairable and there are countless repair outlets to choose from: Apple's, authorized third parties, and unauthorized third parties. The point that these devices aren't designed for your grandson to fix for fun has zilch to do w/ the question of whether they're repairable. They most certainly are and always have been.
    Not sure why you’re saying I’m confused and deploying a straw man when you are rebutting lkrupp, the person who I quoted and was responding to. Yes, lkrupp literally said what you are saying literally no one has said.
    Actually, you misunderstood @lkrupp's post. He quoted a line from the article which mentioned that "Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought". LKrupp's post is a rebuttal to this line in the article. Lkrupp mentioned that people don't want to repair the iPhones on their own, rather want them to be repaired by 3rd party repair shops, apart from Apple stores/authorized service centers. I am in agreement with LKrupp's argument on this. StrangeDays is essentially rebutting the author of this article, not you or lkrupp.

    Edit: Another possibility is that lkrupp and myself have misunderstood the quoted line from the article. My interpretation of that line is that - individuals should be able to repair the iPhones on their own. May be, that interpretation is incorrect.
    edited April 27 jcs2305jony0
  • Reply 17 of 45
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,027member
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    You seem confused. Or you're deliberately deploying a straw man since literally no one said that except you. These devices are already repairable and there are countless repair outlets to choose from: Apple's, authorized third parties, and unauthorized third parties. The point that these devices aren't designed for your grandson to fix for fun has zilch to do w/ the question of whether they're repairable. They most certainly are and always have been.
    Not sure why you’re saying I’m confused and deploying a straw man when you are rebutting lkrupp, the person who I quoted and was responding to. Yes, lkrupp literally said what you are saying literally no one has said.
    Actually, you misunderstood @lkrupp's post. He quoted a line from the article which mentioned that "Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought". LKrupp's post is a rebuttal to this line in the article. Lkrupp mentioned that people don't want to repair the iPhones on their own, rather want them to be repaired by 3rd party repair shops, apart from Apple stores/authorized service centers. I am in agreement with LKrupp's argument on this. StrangeDays is essentially rebutting the author of this article, not you or lkrupp.

    Edit: Another possibility is that lkrupp and myself have misunderstood the quoted line from the article. My interpretation of that line is that - individuals should be able to repair the iPhones on their own. May be, that interpretation is incorrect.
    The rights and the facilities.

    the right to do it yourself
    the facilities for anyone to be able to do it, so that you can get a professional to do it for you

    Hence Apple providing professional grade equipment for repair shops to use.

    If I misunderstood lkrupp’s meaning it was only because he misunderstood what he’d read in the first place. Which wouldn’t be altogether surprising, he has a habit of taking the most unkind reading so that he can express moral indignation and complain about how stupid everyone else is.
    edited April 27 MplsPtobian
  • Reply 18 of 45
    thttht Posts: 4,346member
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    You seem confused. Or you're deliberately deploying a straw man since literally no one said that except you. These devices are already repairable and there are countless repair outlets to choose from: Apple's, authorized third parties, and unauthorized third parties. The point that these devices aren't designed for your grandson to fix for fun has zilch to do w/ the question of whether they're repairable. They most certainly are and always have been.
    Not sure why you’re saying I’m confused and deploying a straw man when you are rebutting lkrupp, the person who I quoted and was responding to. Yes, lkrupp literally said what you are saying literally no one has said.
    Actually, you misunderstood @lkrupp's post. He quoted a line from the article which mentioned that "Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought". LKrupp's post is a rebuttal to this line in the article. Lkrupp mentioned that people don't want to repair the iPhones on their own, rather want them to be repaired by 3rd party repair shops, apart from Apple stores/authorized service centers. I am in agreement with LKrupp's argument on this. StrangeDays is essentially rebutting the author of this article, not you or lkrupp.

    Edit: Another possibility is that lkrupp and myself have misunderstood the quoted line from the article. My interpretation of that line is that - individuals should be able to repair the iPhones on their own. May be, that interpretation is incorrect.
    FWIW, AI's quoted paragraph says RtoR is about individuals. Individuals, not repair businesses, not masses. I don't agree with that AI statement either. Companies can prevent the repair of their products through a variety means, from a license agreement to what some view as unrepairable design. The Right to Repair movement at minimum is about preventing companies from locking 3rd parties out of repairing products. A 3rd party could be an individual, but it involves a whole slew of repair services companies. So, it was really never about individuals imo. Apple lets individuals buy and rent the repair kits. That's a plus. No downsides there. The number of individuals who can actually use the tools? Probably <0.1% of the mass market.

    Lkrupp is right that the masses do not want to repair their devices by themselves. 99.9%, or similar high number, do not want to repair their own stuff, and want someone else to do it for them. Crowley's initial response has a transposition of the mass market not wanting to do the repairs themselves, to the mass market not wanting to do repairs. That appears very strawman like or he didn't actually read what Lkrupp said, as yes, people want their stuff repaired, and cheaply, but the vast majority don't want to do it themselves.

    And yes, the articles I've read absolutely has whining about the cost of rental, the size of the tool kit, etc. They are trying to dredge up drama or simply don't understand how much it costs to rent tools, or even to hire repair people. Your average house repair person is something like $50/hr. It adds up fast. Ever hire someone to paint a wall? A bedroom? Call a plumber? HVAC person? If any service involves paying for the labor of a specialist technician, it's going to cost. The parts don't cost that much. It's the labor.

    If someone wants to become an iPhone repair person, I'd suggest they charge something like $50 to $100 per hour.
    muthuk_vanalingamfreeassociate2AppleSince1976stompy
  • Reply 19 of 45
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    lkrupp said:

    Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought, and these kits are versions of what Apple uses in-store. They're just not cost-effective for any given user, skilled or not.

    Read on AppleInsider
    Really? And just how many of those types of individuals are there in the world? What? You were expecting your grandson to set up a repair shop in your basement to make a few bucks replacing batteries? As usual the screaming minority demands what the masses don’t want or need.

    Oh, I see, the right to repair cadre wants a complete redesign of Apple’s products so that they can use tools from Home Depot to disassemble devices, gaskets instead of adhesives, standard screws and fasteners, snap together plastic housings, etc. Gimme a break.
    The masses don’t want to be able to have their devices repaired? What planet are you from?
    You seem confused. Or you're deliberately deploying a straw man since literally no one said that except you. These devices are already repairable and there are countless repair outlets to choose from: Apple's, authorized third parties, and unauthorized third parties. The point that these devices aren't designed for your grandson to fix for fun has zilch to do w/ the question of whether they're repairable. They most certainly are and always have been.
    Not sure why you’re saying I’m confused and deploying a straw man when you are rebutting lkrupp, the person who I quoted and was responding to. Yes, lkrupp literally said what you are saying literally no one has said.
    Actually, you misunderstood @lkrupp's post. He quoted a line from the article which mentioned that "Right to Repair was always a campaign about how individuals should have the rights, and the facilities, to effect repairs on the devices they have bought". LKrupp's post is a rebuttal to this line in the article. Lkrupp mentioned that people don't want to repair the iPhones on their own, rather want them to be repaired by 3rd party repair shops, apart from Apple stores/authorized service centers. I am in agreement with LKrupp's argument on this. StrangeDays is essentially rebutting the author of this article, not you or lkrupp.

    Edit: Another possibility is that lkrupp and myself have misunderstood the quoted line from the article. My interpretation of that line is that - individuals should be able to repair the iPhones on their own. May be, that interpretation is incorrect.
    The rights and the facilities.

    the right to do it yourself
    the facilities for anyone to be able to do it, so that you can get a professional to do it for you

    Hence Apple providing professional grade equipment for repair shops to use.

    If I misunderstood lkrupp’s meaning it was only because he misunderstood what he’d read in the first place. Which wouldn’t be altogether surprising, he has a habit of taking the most unkind reading so that he can express moral indignation and complain about how stupid everyone else is.
    Having read tht's post & reread the article now, I would say that your interpretation of that quoted line seems to be inaccurate. The entire article is about allowing individuals repairing their own iPhones. Not even a single line of the article mentions about using 3rd party repair shops, using the tools/parts provided by Apple for repair. Given that context, the author seems to imply about individuals repairing their iPhones on their own, and not about 3rd party repair shops.
  • Reply 20 of 45
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,492moderator
    crowley said:
    Trust Apple to make it way more complicated than it needs to be.
    When is the last time you performed ignition timing on your vehicle.  Or swapped out a bad wrist pin on a piston?  Some folks have the tools to do these jobs at home, but they aren’t free or cheap.  Nor are the instructions simple. 
    edited April 27 williamlondonfolk fountaincitpekstobianAppleSince1976stompy
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