Second-generation M2 Apple Silicon chip arrives in MacBook Air, MacBook Pro

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 28
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 15,405moderator
    Alex1N said:
    And no sign of the Apple Silicon MacPro (as far as I can tell)…
    Usually most of the Mac hardware is launched in October. They said there was a Mac Pro coming. It's probably what some people suggested a few months ago that it would wait until they could do a 4-way UltraFusion with M2. This would give them a 40% boost over M1 so M2 Max -> 14.5TFLOPs, M2 Ultra -> 29TFLOPs. An M2 Ultra Duo would be 58TFLOPs and could fit into a Cube size (under $10k) or they can do an M2 Ultra Quad that is a small tower size for 116TFLOPs (under $20k).
    edited June 2022 Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 28
    mpantonempantone Posts: 2,104member
    One thing that was not mentioned in yesterday's presentation was the presence of an interconnect or bridge to link two or more M2 chips together.

    I'm wondering if the blank space in the upper left corner (where Apple put the M2 label) is home to the interconnect circuitry. By putting it in a corner it is possible that Apple could arrange four M2 chips together in a pinwheel configuration. 
    edited June 2022 watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 28
    toddzrxtoddzrx Posts: 254member
    mpantone said:
    dewme said:
    All I can say is get in line behind all of those who are waiting to take a test drive in an Apple Car. 
    Apple Car isn't going to happen in the near future.

    Autonomous driving technology needs to be heavily tested on public roads. Companies who are developing such technology are required to apply for permits to do so. Apple does have this permit here in California but the program does not have the same vehicle miles as companies like Waymo or Nuro.

    For Apple to get California DMV and US DOT approval to market a mass-market autonomous vehicle they will likely need to show tens of millions of miles of successful prototype vehicle tests in a variety of conditions (dense fog, black ice, snowstorms, heavy night rainstorms, high wind), not just leisurely cruising through residential neighborhoods in Cupertino, Sunnyvale, Mountain View on sunny days.

    Apple simply has not logged many miles. There are a few months where there were very few test vehicles and their actual mileage was extremely minimal. You can download the reports from the DMV website.

    All of the major auto manufacturers are working on this, plus a bunch of startups. Many of these prototype test vehicles don't advertise their affiliation.

    Recently I've seen a Mercedes with the typical array of odd appendages and instrumentations on the road. Realistically there is only one company on this planet who would pick a Mercedes to be a test platform for an autonomous vehicle: Daimler-Benz. I've seen a Toyota with a discreet marking of "Toyota Research Institute" on it. I'm keeping my eyes open for Porsche and BMW. They are probably around and I simply haven't seen them yet.
    Autonomous vehicles are turning into the same technology god-send as fusion power: it’s always a few years away. I wouldn’t hold your breath on them. Ten years ago everyone was chattering about how within a decade almost no one would own a car anymore because we’d all be getting around in an autonomous Uber.  Turns out autonomous driving is far more nuanced and complicated than most engineers thought. Personally I don’t think we’ll ever have fully autonomous vehicles driving on our current “dumb” road network. It’s going to require some kind of sensor network built into or near the roads to work. 
    muthuk_vanalingamwelshdogAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 28
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,903member
    toddzrx said:
    Autonomous vehicles are turning into the same technology god-send as fusion power: it’s always a few years away. I wouldn’t hold your breath on them. Ten years ago everyone was chattering about how within a decade almost no one would own a car anymore because we’d all be getting around in an autonomous Uber.  Turns out autonomous driving is far more nuanced and complicated than most engineers thought. Personally I don’t think we’ll ever have fully autonomous vehicles driving on our current “dumb” road network. It’s going to require some kind of sensor network built into or near the roads to work. 
    I agree. It will 50 years before autonomous cars reach anything approaching ubiquity on the roads. What might happen first is sections of roads and highways will be designated as "autonomous ready", and the cars will be allowed to self-drive in those areas. There are just far too many random details on roads for a vehicle to be able to safely parse all it encounters. Plus, road features change randomly and sometimes overnight, which gives the car systems more to deal with. Rain, ice, snow, leaves, dust can all confuse driving systems. Once a week my street is peppered with trash cans, randomly positioned and on both sides of the street. On alternate weeks huge recycling bins are in the mix. Sometimes the wind blows them over, sometimes the workers don't place them back at the curb. I'd love to see how one of these vehicles deals with all that and then handles a person backing out of their drive, or a child running out from behind a can, a loose dog - or all of them at the same time.
    Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 28
    mpantonempantone Posts: 2,104member
    welshdog said:
    toddzrx said:
    Autonomous vehicles are turning into the same technology god-send as fusion power: it’s always a few years away. I wouldn’t hold your breath on them. Ten years ago everyone was chattering about how within a decade almost no one would own a car anymore because we’d all be getting around in an autonomous Uber.  Turns out autonomous driving is far more nuanced and complicated than most engineers thought. Personally I don’t think we’ll ever have fully autonomous vehicles driving on our current “dumb” road network. It’s going to require some kind of sensor network built into or near the roads to work. 
    I agree. It will 50 years before autonomous cars reach anything approaching ubiquity on the roads. What might happen first is sections of roads and highways will be designated as "autonomous ready", and the cars will be allowed to self-drive in those areas. There are just far too many random details on roads for a vehicle to be able to safely parse all it encounters. Plus, road features change randomly and sometimes overnight, which gives the car systems more to deal with. Rain, ice, snow, leaves, dust can all confuse driving systems. Once a week my street is peppered with trash cans, randomly positioned and on both sides of the street. On alternate weeks huge recycling bins are in the mix. Sometimes the wind blows them over, sometimes the workers don't place them back at the curb. I'd love to see how one of these vehicles deals with all that and then handles a person backing out of their drive, or a child running out from behind a can, a loose dog - or all of them at the same time.
    You do know that there are live autonomous vehicles that are approved for testing on public roads? And this testing isn't new, it has been going on for years. Google Self-Driving Car (now known as Waymo) made its first trips in 2009. That's right, THIRTEEN years ago.

    There are probably 30+ companies in the Palo Alto-Mountain View-Sunnyvale-Cupertino area doing live testing including all of the big boys: Daimler-Benz, Toyota, as well as startups like Nuro and the now-acquired Drive.ai (started by Stanford graduate and Ph.D students). Before their acquisition I used to see Drive.ai cars driving around constantly; they were especially noticeable because of the large logo emblazoned on their test vehicles. 

    And guess who acquired Drive.ai? That's right: Apple. 

    And testing on public roads doesn't mean in a confined or deserted parking lot out by Shoreline Amphitheater. I rarely see these vehicles on freeways but there's more complexity in navigating surface streets: other vehicles making directional changes, utility vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists, animals, etc. So they spend most of their time driving up and down regular surface streets including downtown areas in these cities.

    We have been over this before.

    Waymo One is a functional commercial taxi system in Arizona powered by autonomous vehicles.

    We're not going to wake up one day surrounded by autonomous vehicles everywhere but they are already on public roads. Maybe not on the street where you live but most certainly on the street where I live.

    THEY ARE HERE TESTING.

    If you place an online order for delivery from a certain 7-Eleven store in Mountain View, CA, your order may be delivered by a Nuro autonomous vehicle.

    And I'm mostly familiar with what is happening in my neighborhood.

    For sure autonomous vehicles are on public roads elsewhere on this planet. This is not exclusively happening in my backyard I assure you.
    edited June 2022 Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 28
    toddzrx said:
    Autonomous vehicles are turning into the same technology god-send as fusion power: it’s always a few years away. I wouldn’t hold your breath on them. Ten years ago everyone was chattering about how within a decade almost no one would own a car anymore because we’d all be getting around in an autonomous Uber.  Turns out autonomous driving is far more nuanced and complicated than most engineers thought. Personally I don’t think we’ll ever have fully autonomous vehicles driving on our current “dumb” road network. It’s going to require some kind of sensor network built into or near the roads to work. 
    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/driverless-taxis-are-coming-to-san-francisco-180980202/


    Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 28
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,959member
    timmillea said:
    DAalseth said:
    I was surprised by the Macbook Pro being updated and by the Mac Mini not. 
    It was. It is now the Mac Studio, bloated, overweight but apparently giving users what they want. 
    Define bloated, please?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 28
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,903member
    mpantone said:
    welshdog said:
    toddzrx said:
    Autonomous vehicles are turning into the same technology god-send as fusion power: it’s always a few years away. I wouldn’t hold your breath on them. Ten years ago everyone was chattering about how within a decade almost no one would own a car anymore because we’d all be getting around in an autonomous Uber.  Turns out autonomous driving is far more nuanced and complicated than most engineers thought. Personally I don’t think we’ll ever have fully autonomous vehicles driving on our current “dumb” road network. It’s going to require some kind of sensor network built into or near the roads to work. 
    I agree. It will 50 years before autonomous cars reach anything approaching ubiquity on the roads. What might happen first is sections of roads and highways will be designated as "autonomous ready", and the cars will be allowed to self-drive in those areas. There are just far too many random details on roads for a vehicle to be able to safely parse all it encounters. Plus, road features change randomly and sometimes overnight, which gives the car systems more to deal with. Rain, ice, snow, leaves, dust can all confuse driving systems. Once a week my street is peppered with trash cans, randomly positioned and on both sides of the street. On alternate weeks huge recycling bins are in the mix. Sometimes the wind blows them over, sometimes the workers don't place them back at the curb. I'd love to see how one of these vehicles deals with all that and then handles a person backing out of their drive, or a child running out from behind a can, a loose dog - or all of them at the same time.
    You do know that there are live autonomous vehicles that are approved for testing on public roads? And this testing isn't new, it has been going on for years. Google Self-Driving Car (now known as Waymo) made its first trips in 2009. That's right, THIRTEEN years ago.

    There are probably 30+ companies in the Palo Alto-Mountain View-Sunnyvale-Cupertino area doing live testing including all of the big boys: Daimler-Benz, Toyota, as well as startups like Nuro and the now-acquired Drive.ai (started by Stanford graduate and Ph.D students). Before their acquisition I used to see Drive.ai cars driving around constantly; they were especially noticeable because of the large logo emblazoned on their test vehicles. 

    And guess who acquired Drive.ai? That's right: Apple. 

    And testing on public roads doesn't mean in a confined or deserted parking lot out by Shoreline Amphitheater. I rarely see these vehicles on freeways but there's more complexity in navigating surface streets: other vehicles making directional changes, utility vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists, animals, etc. So they spend most of their time driving up and down regular surface streets including downtown areas in these cities.

    We have been over this before.

    Waymo One is a functional commercial taxi system in Arizona powered by autonomous vehicles.

    We're not going to wake up one day surrounded by autonomous vehicles everywhere but they are already on public roads. Maybe not on the street where you live but most certainly on the street where I live.

    THEY ARE HERE TESTING.

    If you place an online order for delivery from a certain 7-Eleven store in Mountain View, CA, your order may be delivered by a Nuro autonomous vehicle.

    And I'm mostly familiar with what is happening in my neighborhood.

    For sure autonomous vehicles are on public roads elsewhere on this planet. This is not exclusively happening in my backyard I assure you.

    None of that chages the fact that self-driving vehicle ubiquity is decades off. Did you miss that word in my post?
    watto_cobra
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