Compared: 13-inch MacBook Pro with M2 vs 13-inch MacBook Pro with M1

Posted:
in macOS edited July 13
The new 13-inch MacBook Pro with an M2 chipset is in our video studio. There's a lot internally to compare, including graphics, processor, and a slower SSD on the new model.

13-inch MacBook Pro
A pair of stacked 13-inch MacBook Pros


The 13-inch MacBook Pro received a modest refresh at the company's WWDC 2022 keynote on June 6. Unlike other Apple Silicon models, the 13-inch MacBook Pro didn't receive a major redesign or significant new features beyond the M2.



Here's how the new Mac differs from its predecessor.




M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Specifications

13-inch MacBook Pro, M113-inch MacBook Pro, M2
Display Size (inches)13.313.3
Max Resolution2560 x 16002560 x 1600
Pixel Density227227
Brightness500 nits500 nits
Display BacklightingLEDLED
Display TechnologyWide Color (P3),
True Tone
Wide Color (P3),
True Tone
ProcessorsEight-core Apple M1Eight-core Apple M2
Memory8GB or 16GB Unified Memory8GB, 16GB, or 24GB Unified Memory
Graphics (integrated)Eight-core Apple Silicon M110-core Apple Silicon M2
External Video1 6K display at 60Hz1 6K display at 60Hz
Storage256GB, 512GB, 1TB, 2TB256GB, 512GB, 1TB, 2TB
Touch BarYesYes
BiometricsTouch IDTouch ID
TrackpadForce TouchForce Touch
KeyboardBacklit with ambient light sensorBacklit with ambient light sensor
Dimensions (inches)0.61 x 11.97 x 8.360.61 x 11.97 x 8.36
Weight (pounds)3.03.0
Battery Life20 Hours20 Hours
Ports2 USB 4 / Thunderbolt 3 ports,
Headphone jack
2 USB 4 / Thunderbolt 3 ports
High-impedance headphone jack
Webcam720p FaceTime HD720p FaceTime HD
Advanced image signal processor
SpeakersStereo speakers with high dynamic rangeStereo speakers with high dynamic range
Microphones3 with directional beamforming3 with directional beamforming
Wi-FiWi-Fi 6Wi-Fi 6
Bluetooth5.05.0
Charger61W USB-C67W USB-C
Color OptionsSilver, Space GraySilver, Space Gray
PriceFrom $1,299From $1,299

M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Processor

The 13-inch MacBook Pro, which was last refreshed in 2020, now sports an upgraded M2 processor instead of the previous-generation M1. The inclusion of the M2 is by far the most significant difference between the two models.

Like the M1, the Apple M2 is based on a 5nm chipmaking process. However, the M2 packs 4 billion more transistors than its predecessor. The core count, on the other hand, remains the same at 8 -- with four performance cores and four efficiency cores.

The M2 also supports up to 24GB of Unified LPDDR5 memory, while the M1 was capped at 16GB. Unified memory bandwidth is now 100 GBps, about 50% more than the M1.

Our testing shows that the M2 chip is roughly 18% faster than the M1 when it comes to standard CPU performance, which aligns with Apple's claims. Because the core count is the same, those gains are likely because of architecture improvements.

The M2 in the 13-inch MacBook Pro outperforms the M1 model easily in benchmark tests.

Geekbench 5 results
Geekbench 5 results on the M2 MacBook Pro


In single-core Geekbench 5 testing, the M2 chip received a score of 1928. The same chip got a multi-core Geekbench score of 8990. For comparison, a late 2020 MacBook Pro with an M1 chip received a single-core score of 1749 and a multi-core score of 7719.

M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Graphics

When it comes to graphical performance, Apple has bumped up the GPU core count on the M2. The chip sports a 10-core integrated GPU instead of the 8-core graphics processor in the M1.

Overall, the new M2 GPU is about 35% faster than the graphics processor in the M1. That's likely because of the additional GPU cores, as well as other enhancements.

Exporting video with the new MacBook Pro
Exporting video with the new MacBook Pro


When it comes to specific graphical tasks, users may notice a slightly bigger bump to performance. Apple says playing graphically intensive games like Baldur's Gate 3 is nearly 40% faster than the M1-based MacBook Pro.

Users who work with RAW images in Affinity Photo will find that their workflows are also about 40% faster than on the previous 13-inch MacBook Pro model.

The 13-inch MacBook Pro also now supports ProRes encode and decode in the media engine. Apple says that will allow it to play back up to 11 streams of 4K video or up to two streams of 8K ProRes video. Video projects can be converted to ProRes nearly three times faster.

When we tested a non-ProRes video export, we didn't see much of a difference. Exporting a 20-minute 4K video took just under ten minutes for the M2 while it took our M1 ten minutes and 14 seconds.

M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Design & physical differences

Even though the new 13-inch MacBook Pro may have a more powerful chip on the side, you'd be hard-pressed to tell the difference between the M1 model and the M2 model. Some tasks, like video editing, is notably faster thanks to the inclusion of Apple's more advanced Media Engine absent in the M1.

Both 13-inch MacBook Pro models are essentially identical when it comes to physical form factor. They share the same overall dimensions and weight.



The M2-based MacBook Pro also retains the Touch Bar, making it the only Mac in Apple's current lineup to have the feature.

M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Display & Camera

Both of the 13-inch MacBook Pro models have the same exact camera -- an aging 720p FaceTime HD camera. The M2 model also retains the same three-mic array as its predecessor had.

However, the updated image signal processor in the M2 chip could still result in slightly better video call performance. Apple says the ISP can improve exposure levels, white balance, and noise reduction automatically.

The cameras are the same on both models, but the M2 has an updated signal processor that could lead to slight video improvements.
The cameras are the same on both models, but the M2 has an updated signal processor that could lead to slight video improvements.


The display is also the same. It's a 13.3-inch LED-backlit display with IPS. It has a resolution of 2560 x 1600 at 227 pixels per inch, True Tone, and 500 nits of maximum brightness.

M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Ports & Connectivity

Both models have a pair of USB4 / Thunderbolt 3 ports that support a range of capabilities, from DisplayPort to Thunderbolt data transfer at speeds up to 40Gb/s. There's also a headphone jack on both models, but the new model has specific support for high-impedance headphones.

13-inch MacBook Pro
13-inch MacBook Pro


There haven't been any wireless connectivity-related upgrades either. The M2 and M1 MacBook Pro models both support Bluetooth 5.0 and Wi-Fi 6, also known as 802.11ax.

If you want to connect your device to an external display, just note that the M2-based 13-inch MacBook Pro still only supports a single external display. It can connect to one display with up to a 6K resolution at 60Hz.

Somewhat related to these hardware changes, Apple did modify the SSD on the base 256GB model. The M2 MacBook Pro has a slower SSD included on this entry-level unit though the higher-capacity options retain their speed.

On our 256GB M1 13-inch MacBook Pro, we were getting roughly 2900 MB/s for write speeds and 2200 MB/s for read speeds. Conversely, the new 256GB M2 13-inch MacBook Pro only is getting 1464 MB/s on the write speed and 1446 MB/s for the read speed.

M2 13-inch MacBook Pro versus M1 13-inch MacBook Pro: Other features

The list of miscellaneous features on both the M2- and M1-based 13-inch MacBook Pro are virtually identical.




Both models come in Silver and Space Gray, both have the same keyboard and trackpad, and both keep the same starting price of $1,299.

One major difference between the M1 and M2 models is the speakers. While both use stereo speakers, the M2 model supports Spatial Audio which can add a 3D effect for some audio tracks.

Additionally, the M2 13-inch MacBook Pro comes with a 67W charging brick instead of the 61W power adapter included with the M1 variant.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    harry wildharry wild Posts: 791member
    Nothing new except faster M2 and memory expansion options.  I will be sticking with my 14” MacBook Pro.
  • Reply 2 of 13
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,659member
    So why’d they bother keeping the Touch Bar? It’s really an albatross at this point. 
  • Reply 3 of 13
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,843member
    MplsP said:
    So why’d they bother keeping the Touch Bar? It’s really an albatross at this point. 
    It's the exact same platform down to the dimensions and 720p FaceTime camera. The M2 MacBook Pro 13" is essentially an SoC speed bump compared to the all-new Air. This was the path of least effort to get an M2 MacBook Pro 13" to market for whatever release window Apple had imagined (maybe back to school, July-August).

    It's important to note that Apple sells more MBAs than MBPs so their focus on the former is justified.

    Without a doubt, there's a ~13" M2 MacBook Pro living in a lab somewhere in Cupertino with a row of normal function keys and an updated case design. When it will be released is anyone's guess but I figure it probably won't be in 2022 based on today's unveiling.
    edited June 6 watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 13
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,761member
    What's point of continuing 13.3" Macbook Pro and sadly on top with touch bar/strip ? At least should have removed it in this update. Have courage to do it!!!

    We have 13.6" GOTO MAC laptop called new MBA, awesome in every respect(except missing usb-c on right) than 14.2" and 16.2" MBPs for performance oriented professionals and non-professionals..
    edited June 7 williamlondon
  • Reply 5 of 13
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,067member
    You know, I've loved Apple since my 128K in 1984, but they often do the STUPID thing for reasons of saving a little money and wanting to wait until a complete redesign is on schedule before they give consumers the good thing.  More specifically, it's quite asinine to release the M2 MacBook Air with a 1080p webcam and stick the foolish 720p camera in the M2 MacBook named "Pro."  That one thing alone makes it laughably un-Pro, and the powers that be at Apple really out to be ashamed.

    But they won't be ashamed, and they will just update it in 2023.  Then all the complaining about that point will cease, and Apple will continue on doing as they have been.

    And on top of all this they leave the Touch Bar that relatively few people like.  No surprise because Apple is refusing a complete redesign of this model, but they would have been better off just to have killed the 13" MBP and shoved consumers to either the MBA or MBP 14".  

    When Steve Jobs came back to Apple, he took a hammer to projects he felt necessary and slimmed down product offerings.  Unfortunately, Tim Cook doesn't feel the same.  On some level, it's a good thing, because Apple did finally axe the butterfly keyboard and brought back Magsafe and the SD card slot (things consumers asked for), but the MacBook line is overly complex and the 13" has enough problems to warrant the axe.  The fact it wasn't axed is why we are all here talking about it.

    So why not the M2 Air instead?  Well, it doesn't have a fan.  That's great until it's summer time.  When the Air gets really hot, it will throttle down performance.  With a fan, it would throttle less.  That's the lone reason people map opt for the 13" over the Air, even in spite of that stupid, idiotic 720p camera.  The 14" is all around better than the M2 13", but it's out of the price range for many students and people on a tight budget.  

    I guess so long as you use your M2 MBA on an ice cube, you will get the best value overall, regardless of heat. :-)
    muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondon
  • Reply 6 of 13
    bala1234bala1234 Posts: 77member
    Oh well! Something for the touch bar fanboys.  As I remember there are a few in these forums...
    williamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 13
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 2,238member
    These two are not as similar as one might think, actually in some cases the M2 is slower than the M1 due to the slower SSD used in the M2. I do not know why Apple did this, but it's not looking good.
    On our 256GB M1 13-inch MacBook Pro, we were getting roughly 2900 MB/s for write speeds and 2200 MB/s for read speeds. Conversely, the new 256GB M2 13-inch MacBook Pro only is getting 1464 MB/s on the write speed and 1446 MB/s for the read speed.


    williamlondon
  • Reply 8 of 13
    MplsP said:
    So why’d they bother keeping the Touch Bar? It’s really an albatross at this point. 
    Maybe they have old stock they want to get rid of?
    williamlondon
  • Reply 9 of 13
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,497member
    The slower SSD can only be described as a dick move. A real bad Apple!
    bloggerblog
  • Reply 10 of 13
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,234member
    jdw said:

    And on top of all this they leave the Touch Bar that relatively few people like.  No surprise because Apple is refusing a complete redesign of this model, but they would have been better off just to have killed the 13" MBP and shoved consumers to either the MBA or MBP 14".  
    Why?  In your "better" scenario every problem you describe continues to exist and consumers have one less choice and get pushed to a machine that is either more expensive or is more thermally limited than they may otherwise prefer.  If a consumer does prefer either of those options to a TouchBar and inferior webcam machine then they'll go to those options anyway.

    I'm sure Apple will get round to a redesign or replacement for the 13" eventually.  Yes, it's a bit annoying that they haven't done so already, but keeping the existing 13" form factor around until they've done so is the sensible approach.

    "Apple should cancel it because I don't want one" is just the usual self-regarding nonsense.
    edited June 28
  • Reply 11 of 13
    Nothing new except faster M2 and memory expansion options.  I will be sticking with my 14” MacBook Pro.
    High impedance headphone jack is new. 67W charger is new. 10 core GPU is new. Entry level M1 MBP had an 8 core GPU and so does the M2 MBA, so 10 core is not the base configuration for the M2.
    edited June 28
  • Reply 12 of 13
    jdw said: More specifically, it's quite asinine to release the M2 MacBook Air with a 1080p webcam and stick the foolish 720p camera in the M2 MacBook named "Pro."  That one thing alone makes it laughably un-Pro, and the powers that be at Apple really out to be ashamed.
    The truth about laptop cameras these days is that they're all going to be getting a LOT of machine/software assistance to improve the quality of the image. You'll be able to tell some differences between 1080p and 720p, but it's not going to be that significant due to both being HD formats + the computer assist. Think about when HD was the new format for video game consoles. Some games ran at 720p and upscaled to 1080p and others ran at 1080p without upscaling. The difference between the two could be perceived, but it wasn't anything major. 
  • Reply 13 of 13
    Kindof boring hearing the incessant complaint about 1 chip vs 2 in the 256 gb SSD.  IT IS NOT SLOWER THERE IS JUST 1 chip instead of 2.  Also.  Even if the performance is lower than a 2 chip configuration, it still blows away the equivalent Dell, and the 2 chip smears the dell. So, yes, chip shortages aside, 2 chips would be better, I would never buy anything less than 512, plenty of room, 256 not enough.   But class 50 dell only 1 gb - pathetic
    tht
Sign In or Register to comment.