UK antitrust agency will investigate Apple & Google over gaming and mobile browsers

Posted:
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The UK's Competition and Markets Authority has concluded its investigation into Apple and Google's dominance in smartphones, but now says it's going to launch three further examinations.




The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has already been investigating what it calls Apple and Google's "vice-like" grip on the smartphone market, and Apple objected to its preliminary report. Now the final report has officially been published, and the regulator plans further investigations.

"The CMA's study into mobile ecosystems -- ie operating systems, app stores and web browsers -- has concluded that Apple and Google's duopoly means they have a stranglehold over these key gateways," says the CMA's summary briefing. "There are many potential interventions which could help unlock competition and protect millions of businesses and people reliant on their services."

"The CMA is taking targeted action now to tackle some of the many problems," it continues, "and the new pro-competition digital regime will have additional powers to oversee key digital markets like these."

"In addition to using our markets powers," says the summary, "we will also continue to use our competition law powers wherever possible to tackle concerns that we have identified."

Saying that it has looked at "where it can take immediate targeted action," the CMA has therefore announced another three investigations, covering:

  • Apple and Google's dominance over mobile browsing

  • Apple's alleged blocking the emergence of cloud gaming

  • Google's Play Store rules regarding access and in-app payments

"When it comes to how people use mobile phones, Apple and Google hold all the cards," said Andrea Coscelli, Chief Executive of the CMA, in a statement. "As good as many of their services and products are, their strong grip on mobile ecosystems allows them to shut out competitors, holding back the British tech sector and limiting choice."

The summary briefing's reference to the additional powers and "new pro-competition digital regime," is not explained, but is likely to refer to the UK's Digital Markets Unit (DMU).

Announced in 2020, launched with 60 staff in 2021, it remains under the CMA's aegis while it continues to have no regulatory powers or authority at all.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    Next up: an investigation of Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo's "alleged blocking" of AAA gaming titles from the App Store prior to the emergence of cloud gaming. Why didn't those companies port their AAA franchises to iOS to compete with mobile gaming titles? What anti-competitive scheme was behind that lack of porting? Consumers obviously were harmed by not being able to purchase Gears of War, Gran Turismo and Zelda for use on their iPhone. 
    thtlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 7
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,269member
    Doesn’t count. It’s only Apple and Google they’re after. Wouldn’t be fair to touch the others. /s
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 7
    larryjwlarryjw Posts: 1,032member
    Funny how the real problems with the tech industry is amplification of misinformation and lies. 

    But, not to my surprise, lobbying by wealthy corporations operating as multiple fake industry groups claiming to just want to help the little guy, gets the politicians to do their bidding.

    It would be far better for us if we ate our vegetables rather than elect them. 
    rob53lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 7
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,449member
    Next up: an investigation of Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo's "alleged blocking" of AAA gaming titles from the App Store prior to the emergence of cloud gaming. Why didn't those companies port their AAA franchises to iOS to compete with mobile gaming titles? What anti-competitive scheme was behind that lack of porting? Consumers obviously were harmed by not being able to purchase Gears of War, Gran Turismo and Zelda for use on their iPhone. 
    MS and Sony do not need to port their games to iOS, considering they have GamePass and PS Now available.  Nintendo is the only one that still hold their exclusives attached to their console.  Maybe Apple is the one that need to check their rules, and allows these kind of services that improve the gaming experience in Apple devices.  
  • Reply 5 of 7
    davidwdavidw Posts: 2,081member
    danvm said:
    Next up: an investigation of Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo's "alleged blocking" of AAA gaming titles from the App Store prior to the emergence of cloud gaming. Why didn't those companies port their AAA franchises to iOS to compete with mobile gaming titles? What anti-competitive scheme was behind that lack of porting? Consumers obviously were harmed by not being able to purchase Gears of War, Gran Turismo and Zelda for use on their iPhone. 
    MS and Sony do not need to port their games to iOS, considering they have GamePass and PS Now available.  Nintendo is the only one that still hold their exclusives attached to their console.  Maybe Apple is the one that need to check their rules, and allows these kind of services that improve the gaming experience in Apple devices.  

    But Game Pass Ultimate is a $15 a month subscription service. That is not purchasing. And AFAIK, if you want to play most of the Microsoft exclusives like the Halo series, without paying for a monthly subscription, you need to use an the X-box or PC with Windows, where you can outright purchase the game. That is different than how gamers can now play most of the Halo series on a Mac or iPhone or Android, by paying for a $15 monthly subscription to Game Pass Ultimate (or Steam). Just like there are music listeners that wants to "own" the music they really like, rather than to pay monthly to stream it, there must be Mac, iPhone and Android device users that wants to "own" the games they really like to play, rather than to pay $15 month to play them or no longer being able to play them. Or otherwise having to buy a game console or Windows PC.

    MS has never ported most of their exclusive titles like Halo to MacOS or iOS or Android. One need to use an X-Box or a Windows PC, in order to purchase and play most MS exclusive titles. Plus games on Game Pass Ultimate are mostly older games. It's still suppose to be a great value but there's no guarantee that you will get the latest games that are currently exclusively available on an X-box or Windows PC. Microsoft still want to use their exclusives titles to attract gamers into buying an X-Box. That's being competitive, not anti-competitive (at least not in the US.). 
    edited June 2022 watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 7
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,449member
    davidw said:
    danvm said:
    Next up: an investigation of Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo's "alleged blocking" of AAA gaming titles from the App Store prior to the emergence of cloud gaming. Why didn't those companies port their AAA franchises to iOS to compete with mobile gaming titles? What anti-competitive scheme was behind that lack of porting? Consumers obviously were harmed by not being able to purchase Gears of War, Gran Turismo and Zelda for use on their iPhone. 
    MS and Sony do not need to port their games to iOS, considering they have GamePass and PS Now available.  Nintendo is the only one that still hold their exclusives attached to their console.  Maybe Apple is the one that need to check their rules, and allows these kind of services that improve the gaming experience in Apple devices.  

    But Game Pass Ultimate is a $15 a month subscription service. That is not purchasing. And AFAIK, if you want to play most of the Microsoft exclusives like the Halo series, without paying for a monthly subscription, you need to use an the X-box or PC with Windows, where you can outright purchase the game. That is different than how gamers can now play most of the Halo series on a Mac or iPhone or Android, by paying for a $15 monthly subscription to Game Pass Ultimate (or Steam). Just like there are music listeners that wants to "own" the music they really like, rather than to pay monthly to stream it, there must be Mac, iPhone and Android device users that wants to "own" the games they really like to play, rather than to pay $15 month to play them or no longer being able to play them. Or otherwise having to buy a game console or Windows PC.

    MS has never ported most of their exclusive titles like Halo to MacOS or iOS or Android. One need to use an X-Box or a Windows PC, in order to purchase and play most MS exclusive titles. Plus games on Game Pass Ultimate are mostly older games. It's still suppose to be a great value but there's no guarantee that you will get the latest games that are currently exclusively available on an X-box or Windows PC. Microsoft still want to use their exclusives titles to attract gamers into buying an X-Box. That's being competitive, not anti-competitive (at least not in the US.). 
    The post I respond talked about "porting" not purchasing.  I you want to purchase MS games, yes, you need to purchase a PC or XBox.  But if you want to play MS games, in a non-MS platform, you can subscribe to GamePass.  

    And GamesPass always have, from day one, games from MS / Bethesda games.  And if the they acquire Activision / Blizzard, their game library will be part of GamePass too.  Personally I think it's a great service.  Too bad Apple don't allow a native app.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 824member
    danvm said:
    davidw said:
    danvm said:
    Next up: an investigation of Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo's "alleged blocking" of AAA gaming titles from the App Store prior to the emergence of cloud gaming. Why didn't those companies port their AAA franchises to iOS to compete with mobile gaming titles? What anti-competitive scheme was behind that lack of porting? Consumers obviously were harmed by not being able to purchase Gears of War, Gran Turismo and Zelda for use on their iPhone. 
    MS and Sony do not need to port their games to iOS, considering they have GamePass and PS Now available.  Nintendo is the only one that still hold their exclusives attached to their console.  Maybe Apple is the one that need to check their rules, and allows these kind of services that improve the gaming experience in Apple devices.  

    But Game Pass Ultimate is a $15 a month subscription service. That is not purchasing. And AFAIK, if you want to play most of the Microsoft exclusives like the Halo series, without paying for a monthly subscription, you need to use an the X-box or PC with Windows, where you can outright purchase the game. That is different than how gamers can now play most of the Halo series on a Mac or iPhone or Android, by paying for a $15 monthly subscription to Game Pass Ultimate (or Steam). Just like there are music listeners that wants to "own" the music they really like, rather than to pay monthly to stream it, there must be Mac, iPhone and Android device users that wants to "own" the games they really like to play, rather than to pay $15 month to play them or no longer being able to play them. Or otherwise having to buy a game console or Windows PC.

    MS has never ported most of their exclusive titles like Halo to MacOS or iOS or Android. One need to use an X-Box or a Windows PC, in order to purchase and play most MS exclusive titles. Plus games on Game Pass Ultimate are mostly older games. It's still suppose to be a great value but there's no guarantee that you will get the latest games that are currently exclusively available on an X-box or Windows PC. Microsoft still want to use their exclusives titles to attract gamers into buying an X-Box. That's being competitive, not anti-competitive (at least not in the US.). 
    The post I respond talked about "porting" not purchasing.  I you want to purchase MS games, yes, you need to purchase a PC or XBox.  But if you want to play MS games, in a non-MS platform, you can subscribe to GamePass.  

    And GamesPass always have, from day one, games from MS / Bethesda games.  And if the they acquire Activision / Blizzard, their game library will be part of GamePass too.  Personally I think it's a great service.  Too bad Apple don't allow a native app.
    Apple did/does allow a native app.  Microsoft just didn't like the terms - too much privacy, discloser, etc., required for each game available on the service.  It was "too hard" for Microsoft - Boo Hoo!
    lolliverwatto_cobra
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