Smooth switching between AR and VR could be big Apple headset feature, says Kuo

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware
Apple's mixed-reality headset could offer an effortless switch between virtual reality and augmented reality modes, analyst Ming-Chi Kuo proposes, with it potentially becoming one of the headset's key selling points.




The long-rumored Apple AR and VR headset has repeatedly been referred to as a mixed-reality device, one that would be equally at home providing VR and AR content to the user. This dual capability could be a key way for Apple to storm into the marketplace.

Tweeted on Sunday by TF Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, it is reasoned that it is generally known what an AR experience is like, and how VR works. "But for most people, it's hard to imagine what kind of innovative experience the smooth switching between AR and VR can provide," offers Kuo.

A clean and simple switch between AR and VR could be "one of the key selling points of Apple's headset," the analyst continues.

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Now everyone knows what a VR experience is & what an AR experience may look like. But for most people, it's hard to imagine what kind of innovative experience the smooth switching between AR & VR can provide, and it may be one of key selling points of Apple's headset.

-- (Ming-Chi Kuo) (@mingchikuo)


In a second tweet, Kuo insists that a complete mixed reality headset "is not only the hardware that can support both AR & VR but the ability to integrate AR & VR and switch them smoothly for different scenarios." This belief is why Kuo is using "AR/MR" to describe the headset.

Kuo concludes by proposing the headset could hit store shelves in Q2 2023. On June 7, Kuo tweeted about a possible timetable for the headset's launch, suggesting a January Apple event could be held for the device.

The headset has reportedly undergone a troubled development, but it has allegedly reached an "advanced" stage of development, including a demonstration to Apple's board of directors.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,077member
    I think this makes so much sense, the ability to switch between AR and VR will be the capability that Apple will exploit to circumvent the social stigma of strapping a VR headset on your head.

    Apple is really the best company to make this happen— to create a small device with custom silicon to allow computational efficiency and manage the heat and power consumption of a device like this.
    edited June 12 lolliver
  • Reply 2 of 7
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,531member
    Pretty sure the system won’t look like these concepts, which would make someone look like a dork. 
    Instead, I think they will be shorter in vertical size, to make them look like glasses. 
    Also that strap makes no sense, as the two parts of the bands would constantly separate at the back of the head.
    seantheman
  • Reply 3 of 7
    Why is an analyst an expert in products. We entertain this moron and his BS not worth the pixels it’s rendered on. Instant swipe past anything with his name. 
    Words like “could be”. And “suggested” are irrelevant and hearsay, leading etc. I let you all be the jury in this one.
    seantheman
  • Reply 4 of 7
    Why is an analyst an expert in products. We entertain this moron and his BS not worth the pixels it’s rendered on. Instant swipe past anything with his name. 
    Words like “could be”. And “suggested” are irrelevant and hearsay, leading etc. I let you all be the jury in this one.
    I think the clue's in his job title.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    badmonk said:
    I think this makes so much sense, the ability to switch between AR and VR will be the capability that Apple will exploit to circumvent the social stigma of strapping a VR headset on your head.

    Apple is really the best company to make this happen— to create a small device with custom silicon to allow computational efficiency and manage the heat and power consumption of a device like this.
    What do you think Meta's Quest 2 is doing right now?  It started out as a VR headset, but today it does both VR and AR, because of its on board camera's.  Now Meta's next version is going to have color cameras instead of just IR cameras.  Therefore it will be able to do what Apple, or these analyst are claiming that Apple is going to be doing.
  • Reply 6 of 7
    Can't any AR system operate in VR mode?  (Obviously, a dedicated VR system would not necessarily have an AR mode).

    Since AR can superimpose individual objects onto a scene, "superimposing" (or substituting) a completely all-encompassing "world" object would seem to be built in to any AR system. At least from a display perspective. Hmm, maybe I answered my own question--these systems require significant graphics horsepower, so even if the display optics are in place to cover your entire field of view, unless you have enough GPU, you would only be able to display a few objects in a simpler AR-only device (even with foveated rendering).

    BTW, what is the use case where a "smooth transition" from AR to VR is required? Not saying it wouldn't be a valuable feature, I just can't figure out a scenario for this.

  • Reply 7 of 7
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,492member
    I suspect Apple has both the glasses and a full headset in the works. Stage view seems to be perfect for a 3D view of the Finder but a full headset would be overkill.
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