Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case review: Tough typing can't be offset by miniat...

Posted:
in iPad edited August 21
Apple didn't make a Magic Keyboard for iPad mini 6, and Lululook's Magnetic Keyboard perhaps acts as a testament to why.

A tiny iPad mini 6 keyboard is fun to look at, less fun to use
A tiny iPad mini 6 keyboard is fun to look at, less fun to use


When we first saw Lululook's iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case, we were excited to see a company attempt what Apple wouldn't. This tiny keyboard turns the iPad mini into a cute portable laptop, but cuteness doesn't translate into productivity.

While Lululook's keyboard may not have mass appeal, it certainly isn't a bad option for those wanting a compact, dedicated iPad mini keyboard. The size, however, is a pain point we couldn't get past.

Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case design

It is clear that a lot of work went into making this keyboard case more than just a simple Bluetooth keyboard with magnets. It is shaped to perfectly house the iPad mini without the need for annoying attachments or extra cases, and the RGB backlit keyboard is aesthetically pleasing.

The upper shell is mostly an empty plastic basin for the iPad mini to rest in. The plastic outer shell feels sturdy, while the inner surface is coated in a rubbery material.

The iPad stays attached via magnets alone
The iPad stays attached via magnets alone


Magnets hold the iPad mini in place, but only with enough force for everyday use. If the case is dropped with the iPad mini inside, expect it to fly out. However, that isn't a negative since we're not using this case for protection, and no lips or rubber boundaries make insertion and removal simple.

The top case sits on a swivel that can rotate 360 degrees. This is great for general media viewing, or playing games with the screen turned around. The hinge is strong enough to keep the device's angle consistent even when tapping and swiping.

The bottom half houses the keyboard and trackpad. The miniature keyboard uses keys that are about 25% smaller than standard keyboard keys.

The keys fit edge-to-edge, but their smaller size and minimal distance between keys make typing a very different experience. Placing our hands on the home row isn't exactly possible, as our fingers have to squeeze together to sit correctly, so typing can be more hunt-and-peck than we'd like.

RGB backlights look great in the dark with little light bleeding problems
RGB backlights look great in the dark with little light bleeding problems


There are RGB backlights that can be adjusted to a few presets with minimal control over what is shown or how colors are arranged. It has three levels of brightness.

The trackpad is plastic, but it doesn't feel cheap like other plastic trackpads. The mouse cursor moves easily on the iPad without much issue, but Bluetooth dropouts can make the cursor disappear mid-drag.

Using the Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case

We love the novelty of having a tiny keyboard purpose-built for the iPad mini 6. However, that feeling quickly disappears when typing becomes challenging and better keyboards are available nearby.

While we'd rate this typing experience better than using the touchscreen keyboard, it's only just. Our fingers are used to typing on full-sized keys, and even after weeks of use, we still struggle to hit the correct key every time.

Lululook's iPad mini 6 case has multiple uses beyond it's suboptimal keyboard
Lululook's iPad mini 6 case has multiple uses beyond it's suboptimal keyboard


Short social media posts, conversations in iMessage or Discord, and other quick typing events were fine with this keyboard. We also liked that the case doubled as a display mount, perfect for keeping the iPad positioned for gaming with a controller.

A magnet in the bottom will activate the iPad mini's sleep mode when the case is shut. Opening the case with an iPad inserted is a two-hand job since the bottom half is very light. Pressure from the thumb can also dislodge the iPad mini when pulling the case open in some instances.

The keyboard connects over Bluetooth and charges via USB-C. A hard-wired mode isn't available, so while users can charge the keyboard via the iPad, it will only connect over Bluetooth.

Should you buy the Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case

If you're desperate for a dedicated iPad mini keyboard case and remain upset that Apple hasn't made one, then Lululook's keyboard case isn't a bad option. While the typing experience isn't ideal, it is still usable for limited cases.

The iPad can swivel around for different viewing options
The iPad can swivel around for different viewing options


If you're expecting something similar to a Brydge keyboard, Apple Magic Keyboard, or other premium iPad keyboard case, this keyboard isn't for you. This is a keyboard where long-form typing isn't expected nor the goal.

Lululook designed the keyboard to fit the iPad mini silhouette at all costs, even the typing experience. Without making the entire case larger or using some kind of folding keyboard, there was no way to improve the keyboard's typing experience.

If these issues aren't deal-breakers and you're ok with buying a keyboard case that isn't really meant to be used as a full-time keyboard, then go for it. This is still a great magnetic case with a swivel stand, adjustable angles, and a decent trackpad.

Despite its issues, this keyboard case is nice to look at
Despite its issues, this keyboard case is nice to look at


Anyone who is picky about keyboards or wants to write more than a handful of words at a time should look elsewhere. The keyboard market has been having something of a renaissance recently, and tiny portable keyboards are abundant. Check out our review of the Nuphy Air60 for an outstanding iPad mini keyboard option.

Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case pros

  • Lightweight, compact case
  • Useful swivel with multiple angles
  • Decent trackpad

Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case cons

  • Small keyboard keys make typing a challenge
  • No wired-mode when attached directly to the iPad via USB-C
  • iPad easily falls out with minimum pressure at odd angles
  • RGB options are limited

Rating: 2.5 out of 5

We scored this keyboard case on the low end because it is not good at doing its primary job -- being a keyboard. It isn't broken or faulty, just too small to be useful for most people. People with smaller hands or kids might enjoy the size and find more value.

Where to buy the Lululook iPad mini 6 Magnetic Keyboard Case

This keyboard case can be purchased from the Lululook website for $99 regularly, but it is currently on sale for $65.99 ($34 off).

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 321member
    It's really a shame to see innovaton get unfairly slammed like this with one of the lower ratings that I've ever seen on AI. And since neither Apple nor Brydge nor Logitech offer a true iPad Mini 6 keyboard solution, I welcome having a choice that reflects quality and smart design of this Lululook keyboard case created exclusively for the Mini 6. 

    If overall typing experience is your main priority in choosing a Mini 6 keyboard, that solution has existed from day of release: it's called the Apple Magic Keyboard, which is both relatively small and lightweight. But consider that Mini 6 buyers are willing to pay a 50% premium to get a smaller form factor iPad over the price of a similarly spec'd and excellent regular iPad, and it should be apparent that small form factor is a top priority for the iPad Mini buyer. And if you want a keyboard tailored to the Mini form factor, then smaller, more cramped keys and a compromised typing experience have ALWAYS been the necessary price to pay for having a full keyboard in a much smaller amount of space. This isn't a fault of the Lululook, it's a requirement--unless you've figure out a way to defy the laws of physics. 

    Mini buyers also aren't using their iPads as their typing daily drivers. What's desired is a keyboard solution that keeps the form factor "mini" and compact, while allowing a "good enough" typing experience when on-the-go. The Lululook keyboard satisfies these requirements better than anything else on the market. In fact, it's only real competitor is Logitech Keys to Go, which isn't specific to the Mini, it has to be carried separately, and the experience of typing on its membrane "keys" can hardly be called "better." 
  • Reply 2 of 11
    Wesley HilliardWesley Hilliard Posts: 76member, moderator, editor
    charlesn said:
    It's really a shame to see innovaton get unfairly slammed like this with one of the lower ratings that I've ever seen on AI. 
    Based on what you've written it seems you saw the score and nothing else in this review. I had nothing but praise for the product and its approach and addressed the use cases and more in the text. I even discussed that the product has other uses and those that don't prioritize typing can find a good product here.

    overall, as stated in the review, it is still a keyboard. And it's not very good at being a keyboard, hence the low score.

    If people base purchasing decisions based on a numerical score and nothing in what the review says, that's their own problem.
    kurai_kagewatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 321member
    charlesn said:
    It's really a shame to see innovaton get unfairly slammed like this with one of the lower ratings that I've ever seen on AI. 
    Based on what you've written it seems you saw the score and nothing else in this review. I had nothing but praise for the product and its approach and addressed the use cases and more in the text. I even discussed that the product has other uses and those that don't prioritize typing can find a good product here.

    overall, as stated in the review, it is still a keyboard. And it's not very good at being a keyboard, hence the low score.

    If people base purchasing decisions based on a numerical score and nothing in what the review says, that's their own problem.
    No, I actually read the review carefully. This is akin to awarding the Macbook Pro 16" 2.5 stars because "it's very big and very heavy, so not great at being a mobile laptop." So what is very good at delivering the experience of a full-size keyboard that maintains the Mini form factor? Oh, that's right... there isn't anything.  
  • Reply 4 of 11
    Thanks for making us aware of this product! It sounds like the author is not in the niche club of iPad Mini owners desperate for something, anything that resembles this. As the price is currently only $56 with STUDY15 promo code on Lululook's site, I just ordered myself a Gray one to go with my iPad Mini 6 in Starlight. (the keyboard comes in gray or black.)

    This looks to be the same keyboard under a different brand name that YouTuber "VeryLastDollar" called "The BEST PREMIUM iPad Mini 6 Keyboard Case" and "The Must Have Keyboard Case For Any iPad Mini 6" which he reviewed at $80. Yes the video is goofy but he's one of the only people I've found that reviews and compares the various mediocre iPad Mini 6 keyboards that are available on the market. He raves about this keyboard and trackpad compared to the other options available. 

    I got the Brydge Mini 7.9" keyboard for my previous-gen iPad Mini and I LOVE that size device for a tiny travel laptop. Having a physical keyboard makes the on-screen keyboard disappear, making the screen real estate feel twice as large in some instances. But one of the big drawbacks of the Brydge was the clamps that pinch the bezels to stay mounted to the iPad. When folding the iPad + keyboard combo shut, pressing on the top rear of the iPad (as one normally closes a laptop) caused the iPad to flex in the Brydge's clamps, so the clamps put undue force on the front of the iPad as it folds down. You can see the screen change colors frighteningly from the pressure points of the hinge clamps. The best solution I found was to flip it over so the iPad itself rests on the table and the keyboard is up in the air, and then press on the back of the keyboard to fold it down against the iPad. Not ideal and hard to get in the habit of remembering to do it this way. 

    In comparison the magnetic attachment of this Lululook keyboard looks like it will be far more gentle to my new iPad Mini. And a trackpad, so exciting! Unlike the author, I'm not a writer, and so I expect to use the trackpad for web browsing a lot more often than the keyboard. And it will hopefully be a nice travel combo that I can also use to hold the iPad screen in various positions for watching videos etc.

    Before the iPad Mini 6 was even available for sale, I wrote Brydge immediately after the Mini 6 was announced, begging them to produce a keyboard with trackpad like this for the new iPad Mini. Over a year later, the old Brydge Mini 7.9" keyboard is discontinued and it's still crickets from them if they'll ever release a new Mini keyboard option, let alone with a trackpad. This Lululook keyboard's nice magnetic cradle solves the old Brydge's hinge pinch problem, and the USB-C charging port is an improvement on the Brydge's micro-USB port as well. I'm not expecting it to be as good as the iPad Magic Keyboard, but I've given up hope anything that good will ever exist for the iPad Mini 6. For about 1/5th the price of a Magic Keyboard, I'm hoping this little keyboard case will be a decent travel companion for my iPad Mini in situations when a full size laptop is too big and too valuable to carry.

    edited August 22 watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 11
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,911member
    Would love to see a chord-keyboard with trackpad for the mini in portrait format. 
    Especially if they could work in so when folded flat backwards you could chord type on the back of the device while standing up instead of thumb type on screen. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    Wesley HilliardWesley Hilliard Posts: 76member, moderator, editor
    charlesn said:
    .
    No, I actually read the review carefully. This is akin to awarding the Macbook Pro 16" 2.5 stars because "it's very big and very heavy, so not great at being a mobile laptop." So what is very good at delivering the experience of a full-size keyboard that maintains the Mini form factor? Oh, that's right... there isn't anything.  
    I think you put too much stock in the numerical score. Obviously you're passionate about the device and agree with me that it's a great option for iPad mini enthusiasts, so why are you so worried about a numerical score?

    your analogy doesn't make any sense. Is the MacBook Pro bad at being a MacBook? No, so it wouldn't get a low score.

    this Keyboard is cute, and a good option for those looking for something for the iPad mini 6. It's just not good at being a keyboard. So it got a low score.

    Is that so hard to comprehend?

    it is fundamentally, objectively bad at being a keyboard. There isn't even a wired option. Lol.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Wesley Hilliard said:
    it is fundamentally, objectively bad at being a keyboard. There isn't even a wired option. Lol.
    This comment suggests perhaps a lack of familiarity with the “iPad keyboard case” market in which this product is competing. Very few iPad keyboard cases allow for a wired connection, except the small handful which connect to some iPads’ Smart Connector (which the iPad Mini 6 sadly lacks.)

    Brydge for example is objectively the #1 or #2 best third party iPad keyboard case brand, and I believe nearly all of their bluetooth keyboard cases also lack the ability to connect via USB. It’s simply not a common feature in this product category. 

    The article’s suggestion that instead of an iPad-mini sized keyboard case we carry a compact mechanical keyboard, reflects perhaps a somewhat outlier set of priorities on the author’s part. Most average consumers interested in this type of product will not be mechanical keyboard enthusiasts looking for a desktop-class typing experience on a tiny iPad.

    Instead what this product offers is a combination of protective case, decent physical keyboard with a pretty standard key layout, and notably a trackpad, all in a laptop-style form factor the size of the iPad Mini. That is an extremely rare combination of features on the market, and so anyone like me looking for those particular features will be very happy to hear about this product. 

    Anyone like the author who prizes a mechanical keyboard typing experience with a separate wired USB keyboard, rather than a mini-laptop style keyboard case with trackpad, is happily already well served by the many wired USB keyboards available on the market. 

    I agree with the criticism that the rating score is unfairly low, given that this is probably the best iPad Mini-sized product of its kind available on the market today. And I also do see how the article does make fair points and aims for some balance, and it offered enough information to get me personally excited about the product despite the author’s personal distaste for it. 

    It’s great to see coverage of this type of product on AppleInsider as there are very few places to find reviews like this of iPad Mini keyboard cases. Hopefully this feedback can be taken as constructive criticism for future product reviews, which I do look forward to reading.

    Instead of judging this product against all keyboards in existence, next time it would be more fair to judge it against other iPad Mini 6 keyboard cases. It’s like rating a gluten-free pizza poorly because there are better tasting regular pizzas in the world. That’s not helpful for a celiac who can’t eat a pizza that isn’t gluten-free. A gluten-free pizza should probably be judged mainly against other gluten-free pizzas, as that is the likely range of options being considered by a reader looking for gluten-free food. 

    For an iPad Mini 6 owner who really wants a matching mini keyboard case with a trackpad, the fact that there are wired desktop keyboards better for extended typing sessions is really not relevant at all. The fact that it seems to offer perhaps the best design of any iPad Mini 6 keyboard case available is probably its most notable quality. As well as its low price, looking at Amazon I found 3 or 4 other Chinese brand names selling versions of this keyboard, but they were all in the $70-80 range. Lululook’s current sale price is quite a bargain in comparison! Thank you again for bringing it to our attention. 
    edited August 23 muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 11
    Wesley HilliardWesley Hilliard Posts: 76member, moderator, editor
    This comment suggests perhaps a lack of familiarity with the “iPad keyboard case” market in which this product is competing. Very few iPad keyboard cases allow for a wired connection, except the small handful which connect to some iPads’ Smart Connector (which the iPad Mini 6 sadly lacks.)
    I appreciate the criticism. Really. But many of your points are addressed in this article.

    First, I love this keyboard case and will use it myself. Don't mistake a review written with all users in mind as my personal opinion, which I make clear in the text. While I don't find the typing experience great, I still value what the case offers and get buy typing slowly and in limited fashions. I also like the swivel stand.

    Second, several points you make are contradicted in the article with my first hand experience. The case is not protective in any fashion, as I mentioned. The trackpad is ok, but not great and prone to dropped connections thanks to working only over bluetooth. And finally, Brydge keyboards, which I've owned several, all work over a wired USB connection.

    In fact, it is strikingly odd that this keyboard doesn't seem to work over USB.

    So, to explain my score again: This is a magnetic keyboard case for iPad mini 6.

    - it is bad at being a case. No protection is offered, and as I said in the piece, that's fine because that isn't the primary goal.
    - it is bad at being a magnetic case. The iPad barely clings to the magnetic pad and often slips free when opening and adjusting angles. Also mentioned in the piece.
    - it is bad at being a keyboard. Speed typists won't be able to adapt to this keyboard unless they have very small hands.
    - it is bad at being a trackpad. The trackpad is great to use and smooth, but disconnects and can't be wired.
    - it is bad at being a stand. There is no weight in the bottom of the case. The iPad will topple over unless on a flat surface used at a specific angle.

    The only thing it is good at is being the only suitable device of its kind. Which is why I didn't score this a 1.0. It is a usable product that isn't broken, so at least a 2.0, but I like it and a niche will like it, so a 2.5.

    3.0 would suggest mass appeal in a working product. where 4.0 suggest the product exceeds expectations. 5.0 is a perfect score in which the product can't be improved in any way and few if any products can match.

    So, 2.5 seems to be the fair choice. Look outside your use case. Even most iPad mini 6 users wouldn't buy this because most iPad mini 6 buyers won't want a keyboard for their tiny tablet.

    I suggested that Nuphy keyboard because it is truly excellent for its size. Most others would probably buy Apple's classic Magic Keyboard.

    I appreciate being angry at a low score on a product you like. But I have to be objective when I write my reviews. Note that I'm scoring this for everyone, not for me.
    edited August 23 muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    Hey Wesley, it's great to hear you are somewhat a fan of this case, and keyboard cases for iPad Mini in general. Would you be interested in doing more reviews of iPad Mini keyboard cases in the future? I'd love to see more coverage of this topic. If you look at the reviews for the Brydge 7.9 keyboard (one of the best keyboard cases for the previous gen iPad Mini) it's full of people begging for a new version. I think there are a number of people interested in this type of product, and like I said really nobody else out there is covering this beat.

    That's interesting to hear that some Brydge iPad keyboard cases are able to work in wired mode. As a product reviewer I'm sure you have a lot more familiarity with Brydge's product line than I do! The only recent iPads I've owned are iPad Minis, and the Brydge 7.9 keyboard is the only Brydge product I've owned personally. Out of curiosity I just cruised through the Brydge user manuals page and I only found that the "Brydge Pro" product line user manuals mention a wired mode. All the other Brydge manuals only mentioned a wireless mode. Does that reflect your experience, or do other Brydge iPad keyboard cases offer wired modes too? I know my Brydge 7.9 definitely does not have a wired mode, I just checked it to be sure.

    Wired mode mentioned:
    Brydge Pro 12.9 For iPad Pro
    Brydge Pro 11 For iPad Pro
    Brydge Pro For iPad Air

    No wired mode mentioned:
    Brydge 12.9 Pro+
    Brydge 11.0 Pro+
    Brydge 12.9 MAX+ for iPad Pro
    Brydge 11.0 MAX+ for iPad Pro
    Brydge Air MAX+
    Brydge 10.2 MAX+
    Brydge 10.2
    Brydge 9.7
    Brydge 7.9

    When I was originally shopping for my first iPad Mini keyboard I was interested in a wired mode option, as I thought it would be best for typing sensitive things like passwords. But I didn't find any good options out there, and I realized for sensitive typing I could always just type on the screen. And the ergonomics of plugging in an iPad keyboard case with a cable dangling off the side don't really seem appealing either.

    Sounds like we both agree that reviews should target the average user, I guess we just have different ideas of what the average user would want. :) When you say "most others would probably buy Apple's classic Magic Keyboard" I suppose you mean the desktop bluetooth keyboard, not the Magic Keyboard with trackpad for iPad, since that doesn't exist for the iPad Mini? 

    I would have to disagree that someone looking for an iPad Mini-sized laptop-style keyboard case with trackpad would buy a standalone keyboard with no trackpad that doesn't attach to the iPad Mini. That would be a logical choice for a professional writer, but I think the average person looking for a tiny keyboard case doesn't plan to do much writing on it. The laptop-style form factor and the built-in touchpad are the key features I'm looking for, and a detached desktop bluetooth keyboard offers neither of those things, it's just in a completely different product category.

    For me the appeal of having an iPad Mini in a laptop-like form factor that can sit on your lap, with a trackpad to enjoy iPadOS's new cursor support, is for the kind of casual lean-back reading / video watching / content consumption usage that I think most people with the iPad Mini would be doing, as opposed to larger iPads that are better suited for more serious work and content creation. Heck I own a 15" Macbook Pro with a pretty good keyboard and I don't do a lot of writing on that, either. Being in the shape of a laptop doesn't necessarily mean its going to be used for extensive typing. Yes occasionally typing the URL of a new website, or the name of a video to watch, or logging in to a site, or perhaps dashing off a short email or note, those are useful things for having a physical keyboard in the package too. But the obvious size limitations of a laptop-style iPad Mini case mean that most people shopping for this type of product are going to have reasonably low expectations for the keyboard's quality compared to a normal sized keyboard.

    Thanks for the replies and I suppose we should both get back to work! I appreciate you spelling out your ratings criteria and I suppose it's perhaps refreshing to see a more rigorous rating scale in today's world where 5 stars is often assumed to be the starting point. If you have interest in reviewing other keyboard + trackpad cases for the iPad Mini I would definitely be interested to see them, and I think a good number of other people would too!

    edited August 23 muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 11
    mac voyermac voyer Posts: 1,292member
    For what it's worth, I got mine today and in my opinion, 2.5 is too high of a score for this product. It is almost so bad as to be unreviewable. 
  • Reply 11 of 11
    I’ve been using this now for 2-3 weeks, and I love it. That said, I agree with almost all of the author’s criticisms of the product. It’s definitely a lower quality 3rd party accessory and not as nice as an Apple product. At the same time, it seems to be the best option currently available for a laptop-shaped iPad Mini 6 keyboard + trackpad case. For anyone like me who’s been eagerly waiting for such a product, this one may be as good as it gets.

    I ordered the “gray” color from Lululook, and I did not realize it would be shipping directly from China. Amusingly I received a keyboard case that looks just like the Lululook but is labeled with the “Doqo” brand. A QC sticker inside reveals the product was actually built by “DongGuan BlueFinger Electronics Co., LTD” which is surely the supplier for Lululook, Doqo, and whatever other brand names sell this case. The color is a space gray which is not an ideal match for my starlight iPad, but it looks good overall. The gray color definitely gives it a strong “Mini MacBook” look and the first reaction at seeing it is “OMG this is SO cute.”

    The two points where I would disagree with the reviewer are about the trackpad and the magnets. Luckily I have not experienced any disconnections of the trackpad on my unit, I’ve found the bluetooth connection to be stable. I think the case puts itself to sleep after a few minutes of inactivity, and the re-connection upon waking up the iPad / case seems quick and reliable. My main disappointment with the trackpad is that it takes some force to register a click, I wish it had a lighter touch. I had to crank up the tracking speed almost all the way to get it to feel right, but then it was fine. 

    About the magnets, I have found them to be a good strength, I have not had issues when opening up the case, nor any problems of the iPad coming out of the case when closed. I do feel the iPad is better protected inside the case than if it were naked, and the magnetic connection is so much more gentle than the Brydge screen clamping design, I am really happy with the magnetic attachment overall.

    The keyboard itself is not great for someone who needs to do a lot of typing, or who has large hands. I’m writing this post on the keyboard case and it’s not an ideal typing experience, but it’s serviceable. My hands are on the small side. Compared to the old Brydge iPad Mini keyboard, the key feeling is not as nice. This keyboard’s keys have a slightly visible bulge toward the center of the keyboard, like an old $15 iPad Mini keyboard I bought in an electronics shop. (The body itself is square and sturdy.) This keyboard is in between the Brydge and the cheapo no-name one that broke before too long. I do appreciate that the keyboard layout is very standard, even more than the Brydge which moved one or two keys to strange places to make everything fit. 

    Some other comments are the power button has to be held down for a very long time before it turns on. It doesn’t have dedicated function keys, you have to hold Fn+3 to raise the screen brightness for example. An acceptable trade-off to fit in the trackpad in my opinion, but if you need F1 type keys for some reason like remote desktop, those don’t exist. The Command and Control keys are where you’d expect but the Option/Alt key is only on the right, which is fine for most iPad apps but might take some adjustment for remote desktop/Mac app usage. And for any RGB enthusiasts, it doesn’t remember your last color setting, you have to cycle through the many color schemes in the same order each time by repeatedly pressing the RGB key. Another thing to note is size: since this adds about 1/2 inch of height to the iPad Mini dimensions and about doubles its thickness, the iPad + case won’t fit inside the wool sleeve I’ve been using for the iPad alone. If you want to carry it inside a sleeve, you may need to get a new one.

    Overall I’m happy with the product and I will definitely be taking it traveling with me for occasional computer needs. The ease of the magnetic connection means you’re not forced into its tradeoffs whenever you want to use the iPad alone or with a different keyboard. Anyone who needs to do a lot of typing should probably consider a larger keyboard and probably a larger iPad too! I’m glad AppleInsider put this case on my radar!


    edited September 20
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