More Apple Music Classical references spotted in iOS beta

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited September 28
As Apple's self-imposed deadline to launch Apple Music Classical nears, more mentions have been found in the latest iOS beta.




Following Apple's acquisition -- and closing down -- of classical music service Primephonic, references to the service were spotted in Android beta software, and betas of iOS 15.15.

Now a Twitter user has shown screenshots from the latest iOS beta that include Apple Music Classical references.

Looks like Apple is setting up Apple Music Classical in the backend now pic.twitter.com/LoWW6mHQLT

-- Aaron (@aaronp613)


There are few details to be gleaned from the code fragments, but they appear to be chiefly related to a classical music subscription. Nonetheless, it's the presence of any such code that is significant as it at least implies that Apple is readying the inclusion of Apple Music Classical within iOS.

When Apple bought the Primephonic company, it promised some details about the service, but specifically said that it would be launched by the end of 2022. That launch will also be of a separate Apple Music Classical app, which is to be based on the old Primephonic app.

Primephonic subscribers are to get six months of Apple Music for free. Within the classical app, Apple has said that browsing and searching for classical music will be improved.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,172member
    I’m probably an outlier but I listen almost exclusively to ‘classical’ music and always have since I was a teenager. I never got into rock during the 60s but instead listened to Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Debussy, Ravel, and the rest. If Apple is going to start a classical music service, even if it will cost extra, I’m there.
    edited September 28 iyfcalvinAndy.Hardwake
  • Reply 2 of 12
    I’m pretty big into classical music myself and am super-excited about this.

    I listen to enough other genres to use and enjoy Apple Music, and of course I hope this service is included with AM. But if it costs a bit more to add it to the bundle I currently pay for, I’ll be happy to do so as well.
    lolliver
  • Reply 3 of 12
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 2,398member
    I subscribe to allclassical dot org and it’s quite good. But I’m curious what Apple can bring to the table. 
  • Reply 4 of 12
    Personally, I love classical music as well as rock, oldies and more (no country).  
    Now retired, I worked for the major record companies. One of the company’s I worked for owned more than 50% of the world’s classical. You’d easily know the label names.
    I’m excited for an Apple Classical product. However, As one of those lovers of classical, and even though I’ve been exposed to a huge amount on the top labels, as a casual listener, I’m still pretty ignorant on how to find the music I like.  In my opinion, there will be a huge amount of people like myself who enjoys classical, listens to their fave classical radio stations, but if they personally have to go find their faves, it’s a major chore and a huge learning curve.  I’m not denying there’s a core of classical music aficionados that would likely thrive on this new Apple service, they’re just not a massive group and on top of that, a lot of classical music fans (baby boomers) are dying off and if you’re in the know, classical music just has very few fans in the Gen X, Gen Y and Z generations.
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 5 of 12
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 2,398member
    iyfcalvin said:
    Personally, I love classical music as well as rock, oldies and more (no country).  
    Now retired, I worked for the major record companies. One of the company’s I worked for owned more than 50% of the world’s classical. You’d easily know the label names.
    I’m excited for an Apple Classical product. However, As one of those lovers of classical, and even though I’ve been exposed to a huge amount on the top labels, as a casual listener, I’m still pretty ignorant on how to find the music I like.  In my opinion, there will be a huge amount of people like myself who enjoys classical, listens to their fave classical radio stations, but if they personally have to go find their faves, it’s a major chore and a huge learning curve.  I’m not denying there’s a core of classical music aficionados that would likely thrive on this new Apple service, they’re just not a massive group and on top of that, a lot of classical music fans (baby boomers) are dying off and if you’re in the know, classical music just has very few fans in the Gen X, Gen Y and Z generations.
    Let’s be fair though, we all listened to rock when we were in our teens and twenties. I like to think that classical is something you grow into, so Gen X, Y, and Z, are not a lost cause. 

    That said classical is very different from other music. If you want to listen to Girl’s Just Wanna Have Fun, or Smoke on the Water, (yes I know I’m dating myself) there is really only one performance of it, one artist who did the version everyone knows. If you tell Siri to “Play The River” it would I expect grab the Springsteen album. On the other hand if you want to hear the Brandenburg Concertos, well there are hundreds of recordings and everyone has their personal favourite. Want to listen to La Boheme? The Met Version, or La Scala? Or maybe the version done in  a studio by a group of singers just to make a perfect recording? Or maybe the Angel Records Highlights version that leaves out all of that annoying chatter between the arias? In this it shares a similarity with some Jazz, where dozens of people have recorded the standards.

    So yes, finding a recording of Die Walkure is hard, (and if you find the one directed by Otto Klemperer my condolences). It’s hard to find the good ones in Classical. Much harder than in other genre. I suspect that’s why Apple is starting a separate service just for it. Regular AppleMusic just didn’t work. My hope is that this will allow more people, and younger people, to discover Classical. 
    edited September 28 decoderringAppleZuluFileMakerFellerlolliverAndy.Hardwake
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Thanks for the thoughtful post, DAalseth.
    DAalseth
  • Reply 7 of 12
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,707member
    T would seem strange that it would be a separate app to Apple Music, but I would imagine that Apple Music is a big, mysterious clue of meshed together code, and it would be enormous work to properly integrate the purchased app.

    On the bright side, classical listeners won’t be constantly told they would just love to listen to this culturally affirming example of hip hop.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    DAalseth said:
    iyfcalvin said:
    Personally, I love classical music as well as rock, oldies and more (no country).  
    Now retired, I worked for the major record companies. One of the company’s I worked for owned more than 50% of the world’s classical. You’d easily know the label names.
    I’m excited for an Apple Classical product. However, As one of those lovers of classical, and even though I’ve been exposed to a huge amount on the top labels, as a casual listener, I’m still pretty ignorant on how to find the music I like.  In my opinion, there will be a huge amount of people like myself who enjoys classical, listens to their fave classical radio stations, but if they personally have to go find their faves, it’s a major chore and a huge learning curve.  I’m not denying there’s a core of classical music aficionados that would likely thrive on this new Apple service, they’re just not a massive group and on top of that, a lot of classical music fans (baby boomers) are dying off and if you’re in the know, classical music just has very few fans in the Gen X, Gen Y and Z generations.
    Let’s be fair though, we all listened to rock when we were in our teens and twenties. I like to think that classical is something you grow into, so Gen X, Y, and Z, are not a lost cause. 

    That said classical is very different from other music. If you want to listen to Girl’s Just Wanna Have Fun, or Smoke on the Water, (yes I know I’m dating myself) there is really only one performance of it, one artist who did the version everyone knows. If you tell Siri to “Play The River” it would I expect grab the Springsteen album. On the other hand if you want to hear the Brandenburg Concertos, well there are hundreds of recordings and everyone has their personal favourite. Want to listen to La Boheme? The Met Version, or La Scala? Or maybe the version done in  a studio by a group of singers just to make a perfect recording? Or maybe the Angel Records Highlights version that leaves out all of that annoying chatter between the arias? In this it shares a similarity with some Jazz, where dozens of people have recorded the standards.

    So yes, finding a recording of Die Walkure is hard, (and if you find the one directed by Otto Klemperer my condolences). It’s hard to find the good ones in Classical. Much harder than in other genre. I suspect that’s why Apple is starting a separate service just for it. Regular AppleMusic just didn’t work. My hope is that this will allow more people, and younger people, to discover Classical. 
    Yes, this is why a separate system for classical is needed, and why Apple may be the company that finally delivers it in a meaningful way to consumers. People want to find classical music by composer or performer or combinations of performers and so forth. Pop music just isn't organized that way, and the music cataloguing systems set up for pop or rock just can't serve the needs of classical music listeners.

    The other big difference is that classical music often comes in long-form compositions, made up of several parts, or 'movements.' Beethoven't famous Fifth Symphony has four movements. They're like separate but related thematic songs, and they're supposed to come bundled together, in sequential order. Classical music listeners want to hear all four parts, in the correct order. They want to hear all three movements of a piano sonata. Music systems and playlists designed for pop don't care about that, and it grates on the nerves of classical music listeners when orphaned sections of compositions get cobbled together in random order. It's like reading single chapters from mystery novels in random order. Not satisfying at all.

    So this new resource will be a welcome one, and really it's an unmet need that goes all the way back to physical record stores. Anywhere outside major metropolitan areas, the classical section of a record store (if there even was a classical section) would be a poorly stocked set of bins off in a corner, organized by a clerk who had no knowledge and less interest in the material there.

    If Apple's classical music service is included at no extra cost with existing music subscriptions, it could actually create a real renaissance for the genre. It'll become available in a way that satisfies the aficionados, and also will allow the novice to explore and drill down in a meaningful way beyond the generic compilation albums that usually represent the beginning and end of most newbies' interaction with this type of music.

    Apple's 'spatial audio' feature introduced last year has created an explosion of surround-sound music content. Making it available at no extra charge to anyone with an iPhone and an Apple Music subscription has finally accomplished what had never been achieved since the early 1970s introduction of quadrophonic sound. The need for specialized surround-sound physical media and specialized playback equipment to play it has always been a barrier to those formats ever taking off. Not enough people buy the gear to make creating the content profitable, so very little surround sound music content was created, and was usually expensive enough not many people would buy it. Apple fixed all that by making the gear you already have play spatial audio, and so lots of new material is mixed in surround, and scads of old albums are being remixed for the format. Apple Classical Music may do the same thing for classical music by bringing the format to consumers in a way that makes sense for the content. This is actually in Apple's DNA: they're often not the first to do a thing or make a thing, but they're quite often the first to do it right.
    DAalsethFileMakerFellerlolliverMBeardecoderring
  • Reply 9 of 12
    I don't get why Apple is creating fragmentation and not just having a classical section on the pre-existing Apple Music.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    It would be much better just to support *Roon* instead of splitting the music service. I guess Apple needs to build a different platform for classical, because the great sin of Apple Music is that it is centered in tunes, not records or compositions. They also have problems differentiating performers from compositors, among many other shortcomings.

    Roon made me possible to listen Classical music again from Tidal. It is amazingly good finding, retrieving, filtering and relating every piece of information regarding records, compositors, orchestras, directors, performers, even individual compositions (you click in a composition, then lists every other published version of it, that you can then filter it, for example). As good or even better than the decicated classical music streaming service iDagio that I used for some years. 

    Besides that it has a much better gui than Apple Music (and almost everybody else), a flexible remote support for every single reproduction device in your network, dsp, and faboulous management of your own music library. Simply spectacular. A bit expensive, but if you love music is a must.

    A more general topic here is the poor treatment of metadata by almost every streaming service. Sometimes it seems they don't know what a relational database is for. That's what Roon fixes so well.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    simply258 said:
    I don't get why Apple is creating fragmentation and not just having a classical section on the pre-existing Apple Music.
    We don't actually know that this will be a case of 'fragmentation.' Just speculating, but my guess is that while there will be a separate classical music app, it will communicate and integrate with the regular music app. Classical music is in many ways its own thing, but there aren't really hard lines between music genres, and anywhere there seem to be, there are artists happy to poke through those lines and make the world a better place.

    Anyway, the biggest trick is going to be Siri's ability to understand, intuit and respond accurately to verbal commands seeking specific combinations of composers, performers, compositions and even specific performances of the above:  Hey Siri, play the 1955 Glenn Gould recordings of the Goldberg Variations by Bach. To get that right, Siri has to find Glenn Gould, select the 1955 recordings but not the 1981 recordings, and then cue up a 32-track playlist in the right order. Mind you, the record label has released this music in a number of different iterations, including separate albums for the 1955 and 1981 versions and also a compilation that includes both. So this one-sentence command will require a fair amount of AI sophistication to give the listener the result they're after.


  • Reply 12 of 12
    Wait, will this be part of the Apple Music subscription? I listen to Classical 80% of the time but I’m not going to pay extra for an app that has better metadata and a better search function.
Sign In or Register to comment.