Compared: Parallels Desktop 18 vs VMWare Fusion

Posted:
in Mac Software
If you need to run Windows apps on an Apple Silicon Mac, the two best choices are Parallels Desktop 18 for Mac and VMWare Fusion. Here's what you should know about the two tools.

You can get Windows onto an Apple Silicon MacBook Air.
You can get Windows onto an Apple Silicon MacBook Air.


One of the rare issues with Mac ownership in a multi-platform working environment is that you may run into a situation better suited for a Windows desktop. Sometimes you simply can't run certain apps you may need, as macOS-compatible equivalents aren't available. Though other apps may perform the same functions, they may not be the right ones for the job.

There may also be apps that do offer cross-platform support, but the user may prefer the UI of the Windows version over macOS, or the Mac app may not have all of the features of the Windows version.



In the case of gaming, not all titles are developed to run on macOS, with many older games and those produced by small teams potentially being a Windows-only affair for players.

There's also the usability problem, as a long-time Windows user may not necessarily want to learn how to navigate macOS for whatever reason.

This is where virtualization tools step in. Applications that run a virtual machine, allowing users to install Windows on their Mac and run it from within macOS. In effect, the tool acts as a computer to Windows, allowing it access to the resources of the host Mac, but still runs entirely normally.

Two of the biggest names in virtualization for macOS users are Parallels Desktop for Mac and VMWare Fusion. They're both utilities that can get you running Windows on your Mac, but there are differences in how the two operate.

Here's what you should look for when choosing either of them.

But what about Boot Camp?

Boot Camp is Apple's way of allowing users the same goal of running Windows on a Mac. Using Boot Camp Assistant, you can install Windows and the required drivers to a Mac fairly easily.

This is a good system on its own and also free to use, but two big things hold it back compared to virtualization tools.

Boot Camp is viable to get Windows on your Mac. Except for Apple Silicon.
Boot Camp is viable to get Windows on your Mac. Except for Apple Silicon.


For a start, Boot Camp isn't virtualization, as you're creating a partition for Windows and installing it on a drive. This can provide the fastest Windows experience as neither a virtual machine nor macOS is getting in the way between Windows and the hardware.

But, this does mean if you want to switch between Windows and macOS, you will have to shut down one to move to the other. With VM tools, you're running Windows on top of macOS so that you can use both operating systems simultaneously.

The other problem with Boot Camp is that you cannot use it on an Apple Silicon Mac, only those running on Intel chips.

Add in that Microsoft won't be bringing out Windows on ARM with Apple Silicon support, and you're left with using virtualization tools.

Boot Camp is a viable option if you have an Intel-based Mac and don't mind shutting down macOS to get to Windows. Virtualization is the way for anyone with a modern Mac or MacBook.

Parallels Desktop 18 for Mac

Parallels Desktop for Mac is considered the more user-friendly of the two, with little effort required to get up and running with the software.

After installing Parallels Desktop, it then proceeds to set up a virtual machine for Windows 11, downloads Windows, installs it, and gets you up and running in a very short space of time. With a sufficient Internet connection, you could be using Windows within macOS in less than an hour.

Parallels can download Windows 11 onto your Apple Silicon Mac for an easy setup process.
Parallels can download Windows 11 onto your Apple Silicon Mac for an easy setup process.


Once set up, you're left with a Windows desktop within a macOS window. Everything looks like a stock Windows installation.

If you have an existing Boot Camp installation, you can incorporate that into Parallels instead of needing to shut down to switch. If you have an Intel Mac, you could even import that Boot Camp installation into Parallels.

The Windows desktop will show files stored on the Mac desktop, so you can easily open and change them within each operating system and directly impact the counterpart in the other. There's also disk space optimization, so you're not going to burn up a lot of capacity with the tool.

There's also the ability to drag and drop files between Mac and Windows and to copy and paste text too. This creates a very seamless working environment between the operating systems.

Parallels can take items from your macOS desktop and make them immediately usable from Windows' own.
Parallels can take items from your macOS desktop and make them immediately usable from Windows' own.


In the window's taskbar, there are options for managing the virtual machine and performing various keyboard shortcuts, control volume, folder access, and so on.

After installation, you can configure the VM instance in various ways, including how many CPUs it uses, graphics resolutions, connected devices, how it shares applications with Mac and many other options.

There is also the option to use what is referred to as Coherence, a mode where you see just the Windows app, not the entire Windows desktop. That means you could have Windows apps appearing as if they're running in macOS, which can be initially confusing but very helpful if you just want to see one app.

If Windows isn't your cup of tea, you could install a Linux distribution with relatively little effort and again have it up and running in a short space of time.

Coherence mode in Parallels allows you to run Windows apps (like Microsoft Edge) as if they're macOS apps.
Coherence mode in Parallels allows you to run Windows apps (like Microsoft Edge) as if they're macOS apps.


Parallels Desktop 18 for Mac is offered in three versions: Standard Edition, Pro Edition, and Business Edition. You'll get most of what you want from Standard Edition, but the other two have more advanced features aimed at enterprise users.

For example, while the $99.99 Standard Edition can manage four virtual CPUs and 8GB of vRAM, the Pro and Business go up to 32 vCPUs and 128GB vRAM.

The $199.99 per year Pro Edition also includes a Visual Studio plug-in for remote debugging, virtual networking tools, automation elements, integrations with Docker and others, and premium phone support, among other factors.

For $149.99 per year, Business Edition includes the Pro Edition's features, allowing employees to download preconfigured versions of Windows to their Mac, per-user licensing, a centralized administration and management tool, and unified volume license keys for mass deployment.

VMWare Fusion

For quite some time, VMWare Fusion was considered equal to Parallels in terms of virtualization on Mac. The problem is that, since the release of Fusion 12, it's stalled in place.

Yes, Fusion 12 from late 2020 could run Windows on an Intel Mac, but Apple has progressed considerably and onto its own chips.

While progress has been slow, VMWare has slowly been working towards releasing a version of its software made so that it functions on Apple Silicon, which is available in a Public Tech Preview.

The good news is that it's free to try out the tech preview. The bad news is that it's not easy to start with Windows on Apple Silicon.

For a start, it works on the basis that you're going to provide the operating system to install, be it a Linux distribution or Windows. So you're going to have to download that from Microsoft via its Windows Insider program.

Installing operating systems in VMWare Fusion is a little more involving. And then there's Windows 11 for ARM...
Installing operating systems in VMWare Fusion is a little more involving. And then there's Windows 11 for ARM...


Then you have to follow a set of instructions that had to be picked up via a Google search, rather than anything official. This guide on Cellular.FM describes the extremely long process you have to undertake to get to running Windows 11 via VMWare Fusion's tech preview.

In short, it explains to download the Windows 11 ARM64 Insider Preview, how to install Homebrew on your Mac to install QEMU, and using QEMU to convert the Windows VHDX file to a VMDK instead. Then you have to install Windows to VMWare Fusion, taking care to disable Internet access otherwise it won't work, and then follow other procedures to install VMWare's tools to get the final bits set up.

Understandably, a tech preview could require a bit more effort than a full public release, but this is beyond the reach of most average users.

The annoying thing is, once you've got Windows 11 ARM64 installed, it works perfectly adequately. It's just the journey that's the problem.

As a more admin-focused tool, it's also understandable that there are a lot of things you can configure within the software. And again, some of this is not end-user-friendly to deal with, but you don't have to touch the more complex items.

The interface can get a little complex, but VMWare does skew towards professional usage instead of home users.
The interface can get a little complex, but VMWare does skew towards professional usage instead of home users.


Given VMWare's very corporate-focused approach and leaning away from VMWare Fusion's development, it may be quite some time before the Apple Silicon adoption by the main release will happen.

Hopefully, whenever that does occur, VMWare will also make it a lot easier to get going with Windows on an Apple Silicon Mac.

Aside from the technical preview, VMWare still offers the proper Fusion 12 releases for use.

Fusion 12 Player is its most basic release, providing all of the essential functionality you need, including installing multiple VMs, DX11 and OpenGL4.1 support for 3D graphics, and snapshots.

VMWare offers a commercial license for Player at $149, but for home users who will use it for non-commercial reasons, a free license can be acquired instead.

Fusion 12 Pro adds features like creating and managing an encrypted VM, virtual network customization, connections to vSphere and ESXi Server, linked and full clones, remote vSphere host power control, and other more admin-based elements.

Pro costs $199, while a version with one year of technical support assistance and access to knowledge base articles is $241.

Not a close race

If you're a home user, you're presented with two options for virtualization on Apple Silicon. However, it's very hard to advise anyone to go down the route of VMWare Fusion at this point.

It's one thing to have a solid toolset in place for Intel Macs, but it's quite another to leave Apple Silicon users out in the cold with a tech preview for devices that are nigh two years old.

Not to mention that getting Windows 11 for ARM running on VMWare requires so many steps and messing about in Terminal and the Windows command line to be intimidating to some end users.

Parallels may not be free, but the straightforward process to get started with Windows on Apple Silicon is a world away from the more challenging VMWare experience. The Coherence mode to get Windows apps on the macOS desktop is just a cherry on top.

Even if VMWare brings out Fusion 13 with Apple Silicon support, complete with another free-for-non-commercial license, it will have to do a lot to make itself more user-friendly to become recommendable.

Sure, administrators and more technically-minded users will find VMWare Fusion's system a good thing to try, even through morbid curiosity. But for people who just want to run Windows on their Apple Silicon Mac, Parallels Desktop 18 for Mac is the better choice.

Where to buy

Parallels Desktop for Mac starts at $69.99 when you upgrade to the latest version and $99.99 for new license purchases. Students can save up to 50% on the academic version.

Paid VMware Fusion plans, meanwhile, start at $79 for Player upgrades and cap out at $241 for a new license to the Pro plus Support plan. A free Personal Use License is available with a valid MyVMware account for home users participating in non-commercial activity. And if you have a valid Parallels license, VMware is offering 40% off its Fusion line when you switch.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    xiao-zhixiao-zhi Posts: 110member
    You miss an important point for Parallels Coherence mode. You can set up Windows to use Mac control keys to avoid having to code switch between OS when you are running both. This also supports MacOS keyboard mapping. For people who use a lot of control keys this is a significant improvement.
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 16
    JP234JP234 Posts: 550member
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 3 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,007member
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    I bought a top-of-the-line 2020 iMac right when ASi Macs were about to be introduced, knowing it would be my last Intel-based iMac.  I'm one of those Mac users that has no choice but to use Windows as many of my clients are windows-only environment and I need it for tools and software that is only available for Windows.  There is not choice to go it alone on a Mac.  So why it mystifies you is simple... you're not in that segment that needs it.

    I've been a VMware Fusion user since v4.  I haven't used Parallels in a long time, but when I decided between the two back then, Fusion was the far superior choice for me and still is.
    chadbagdewmeFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 16
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 410member
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    If you have to ask, don't mess with it.
    chadbagdewmeFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 16
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 168member
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    It's a reasonable question to ask, and there are reasonable answers.

    Consider someone who needs to run a mix of Mac and Windows applications.  There are conveniences to having them all on one machine, rather than split across two machines.  
    • It's trivial to share files between the two platforms when they are hosted on the same platform
    • If you are on the road, A single laptop weighs less than two laptops
    • A single Mac based backup strategy can backup both platforms
    • VM software may cost less than a separate second machine
    • VM software makes it easy to switch back and forth between the two platforms for workflows that involve both Windows and Mac applications
    Now, if your workflow is such that some says you are at your desk working in Windows, and some days you are at your desk working in Mac, then two separate machines may be the best solution.

    Personally, when I am on the road, I am much happier carrying only a single laptop.

    dewmemuthuk_vanalingamFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 16
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,804member
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    Why buy a POS low end Windows machine to run a once a year Corp tax program?   I don’t have space for it and using VMWare is much easier and less hassle.  Plus I have MacOS VMs to run a PPC version of an app using original Rosetta in the last version of Mac OS X that supported that plus one using the last macOS that supported 32 but apps.  I have a couple side businesses that don’t make enough money to make it worthwhile for me to upgrade my expensive PLC app or 32 bit app to the latest so I run these in the VM fir as long as I can. 

    I used to use Parallels.  That ended when an update wouldn’t install and I couldn’t run it any more and their support was basically “crickets”.  Couldn’t be bothered to help.  That was like 10-12 years ago but the sour taste has stayed with me and so I’ve avoided Parallels since and have been a paid and happy VMWare user since. 

    And btw. I run Windows 10 natively on a 2008 MacPro.  Run special model train software for configuring and testing some interfaces.  But that computer is dedicated to that task and it is too much hassle to try and use it for my once a year tax need 


    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 16
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    The simple reason is that there are some programs on the Windows platform that are better than the Mac version.  For me, that program is Quicken.  The Mac version is okay, but instead of taking a perfectly good program (the Windows one) and converting it over to MacOS, they decided to reinvent the wheel and some of it just simply sucks.  I use both, but where I use the Windows version everyday, the Mac version is one I update just every month or so.
    The other program that I find to have handy is, believe it or not, WordPerfect.  I used it for years (like since 1987) before being forced into Word by work.  To this day, I feel it is a superior program to Word, and Corel does not make any Mac software.  So Parallels is very important part of my iMac.  Having 64GB of RAM makes it pretty easy to use as well. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 16
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,551member
    kimberly said:
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    If you have to ask, don't mess with it.
    Yup, best post of the day.

    I would add that until Microsoft officially sanctions running Windows ARM on Apple Silicon, and Apple support answers questions from customers doing so, pretty much anything that third parties like Parallels or VMWare are doing to run Windows on M1 is a hack. Putting a fancy wrapper with ribbons and bows and a fancy installer around a hack doesn't make it a non-hack. At least VMWare didn't spend a lot of time and effort trying to disguise their hack. It's a hackish hack and is dripping hacky sauce all over the place. The fact that these hacks can actually work quite well on M1 is a testament to Apple's amazing hardware engineering. But the massive foot of Microsoft can, at any time, descend from on high, or Redmond, and stomp your little hack out of existence.

    There's nobody who would like to see an official and fully blessed version of Windows 10/11 running in a hypervisor like Parallels or VMWare on Apple Silicon more than me, but I want it to be fully legit and blessed by Microsoft. Both of these products are amazing productivity tools in the right hands, but I'm not going to invest my time, effort, or money in a hack job that's not fully support by the owners of the host and guest OSs. I'd rather buy a NUC or one of the last-gen Intel Macs or jump through hoops with KVMs or multi-input monitors to serve my Windows needs. 

    Also, hypervisors are not only about running different species of operating systems on the same hardware. They are also incredibly useful for running multiple versions of the same species of operating system on the same hardware ... and running "totally clean" and "totally clean plus 1-variable" instances of the same operating system on the same hardware. If you are doing software development and testing it's incredibly useful to be able to track down issues by limiting the number of variables. When your dev box is managed by someone other than you, good luck trying to figure out why your code is suddenly broke in the morning when it worked when you went home and nobody touched a single byte of code.

    There are so many benefits that hypervisors deliver in the hands of those who actually need them and depend on them for productivity.

    chadbagFileMakerFellercrowleywatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 16
    With Parallels, we still have to install Windows ARM version right? Would I be able to run Visual Studio and MS SQL Server on an Apple Silicon based Mac with Parallels?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 16
    Paul_BPaul_B Posts: 82member
    chadbag said:
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    Why buy a POS low end Windows machine to run a once a year Corp tax program?   I don’t have space for it and using VMWare is much easier and less hassle.  Plus I have MacOS VMs to run a PPC version of an app using original Rosetta in the last version of Mac OS X that supported that plus one using the last macOS that supported 32 but apps.  I have a couple side businesses that don’t make enough money to make it worthwhile for me to upgrade my expensive PLC app or 32 bit app to the latest so I run these in the VM fir as long as I can. 

    I used to use Parallels.  That ended when an update wouldn’t install and I couldn’t run it any more and their support was basically “crickets”.  Couldn’t be bothered to help.  That was like 10-12 years ago but the sour taste has stayed with me and so I’ve avoided Parallels since and have been a paid and happy VMWare user since. 

    And btw. I run Windows 10 natively on a 2008 MacPro.  Run special model train software for configuring and testing some interfaces.  But that computer is dedicated to that task and it is too much hassle to try and use it for my once a year tax need 



    Just buy a Windows machine.  If you need a Macintosh - use your Macintosh.  I can't even come close to comprehend your logic.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Very interesting article for me.

    I have one piece of Windows software that i must use for work which is not available for Mac. Currently I'm using an Intel iMac and Parallels to run windows 7 and it works well. I've been using Parallels to do this since version 3 i think! My iMac is reaching end of life and i want to upgrade to Apple Silicon, but it is imperative that I can keep using that one particular piece of software.

    Questions:
    • If i was to buy an M1 Mac (or M2...) and install Windows 11 ARM through Parallels, would it run my Intel windows App?
    • The version of Windows 11 ARM that parallels downloads is a preview? Is it free? What happens when it is officially released, will i need to buy a copy?
    Responses very welcome! Thank you!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 16
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,804member
    Paul_B said:
    chadbag said:
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    Why buy a POS low end Windows machine to run a once a year Corp tax program?   I don’t have space for it and using VMWare is much easier and less hassle.  Plus I have MacOS VMs to run a PPC version of an app using original Rosetta in the last version of Mac OS X that supported that plus one using the last macOS that supported 32 but apps.  I have a couple side businesses that don’t make enough money to make it worthwhile for me to upgrade my expensive PLC app or 32 bit app to the latest so I run these in the VM fir as long as I can. 

    I used to use Parallels.  That ended when an update wouldn’t install and I couldn’t run it any more and their support was basically “crickets”.  Couldn’t be bothered to help.  That was like 10-12 years ago but the sour taste has stayed with me and so I’ve avoided Parallels since and have been a paid and happy VMWare user since. 

    And btw. I run Windows 10 natively on a 2008 MacPro.  Run special model train software for configuring and testing some interfaces.  But that computer is dedicated to that task and it is too much hassle to try and use it for my once a year tax need 



    Just buy a Windows machine.  If you need a Macintosh - use your Macintosh.  I can't even come close to comprehend your logic.

    It’s not hard to understand.   It’s dead simple. 
  • Reply 13 of 16
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 168member
    ...
    Questions:
    • If i was to buy an M1 Mac (or M2...) and install Windows 11 ARM through Parallels, would it run my Intel windows App?
    Probably.  The ARM version of Windows 11 is able to run most Intel Windows software.  I am running an old Windows intel version of Quickbooks using parallels on my M1 Max MacBook.  I have not noticed any problems.

    Apparently, the ARM version of Windows has the ability to run Intel native Windows software.

    My understanding is that not every piece of intel software will work.  Specialized drivers, and games tend not to work.



    • The version of Windows 11 ARM that parallels downloads is a preview? Is it free? What happens when it is officially released, will i need to buy a copy?
    Responses very welcome! Thank you!

    I have not seen an official response on this issue.

    The Windows "about" screen tells me I have the "Windows 11 Home" edition, version "21H2". It also says my processor is "Apple Silicon".  I se nothing to suggest that this is a "preview" edition.

    Windows also tells me that "Windows is activated with a digital license linked to your Microsoft account".

    A quick look on the Parallels web site tells me that Parallels allows me to install and run Windows 11 on my M1 Mac.  I did not see any mention that this was a "preview" version of Windows.

    Hopefully, someone can provide an official answer.  But to me it looks like you are safe to run Windows 11 under Parallels.  
    GrannySmith99watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 16
    It's getting more and more viable to just rent a VM in the cloud somewhere. Why spend an hour or more futzing around with the Fusion preview when it can be less than ten minutes to spin up an instance on AWS or Azure and just use Remote Desktop?
    watto_cobradewme
  • Reply 15 of 16
    Its rarely mentioned but Fusion is free for personal use. You only pay for a commercial license or for pro. Otherwise just download VMware Fusion Player – Personal Use License
  • Reply 16 of 16
    Paul_B said:
    chadbag said:
    JP234 said:
    It mystifies me as to why anyone would want to run Windows on a Mac, silicon or otherwise. Sure you can do it, but in the words of my late mother, "JP, just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." Mom was wise.

    With Windows PCs available for next to nothing, both new and refurb, with Windows pre-installed (you know Windows is not included with either emulator, right?), please, someone provide me with justification for not just buying a cheap PC to run your QuickBooks Pro, or some other application not available on MacOS?
    Why buy a POS low end Windows machine to run a once a year Corp tax program?   I don’t have space for it and using VMWare is much easier and less hassle.  Plus I have MacOS VMs to run a PPC version of an app using original Rosetta in the last version of Mac OS X that supported that plus one using the last macOS that supported 32 but apps.  I have a couple side businesses that don’t make enough money to make it worthwhile for me to upgrade my expensive PLC app or 32 bit app to the latest so I run these in the VM fir as long as I can. 

    I used to use Parallels.  That ended when an update wouldn’t install and I couldn’t run it any more and their support was basically “crickets”.  Couldn’t be bothered to help.  That was like 10-12 years ago but the sour taste has stayed with me and so I’ve avoided Parallels since and have been a paid and happy VMWare user since. 

    And btw. I run Windows 10 natively on a 2008 MacPro.  Run special model train software for configuring and testing some interfaces.  But that computer is dedicated to that task and it is too much hassle to try and use it for my once a year tax need 



    Just buy a Windows machine.  If you need a Macintosh - use your Macintosh.  I can't even come close to comprehend your logic.

    You've never worked in a dev/testing environment. Virtualisation, configuration, snapshots, rollback of test VMs absolutely essential in my use case. And to be able to rollback a dev VM if something stuffsup, absolutely priceless.
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