Apple removes headphone jack from new 10th generation iPad

Posted:
in iPad edited October 2022
The new 10.9-inch iPad now requires either wireless headphones, or the use of a USB-C adapter as it becomes the latest device to lose the famous 3.5mm headphone connector.




Completing the process it began with the iPhone 7 in 2015, Apple has now removed the headphone jack from all of its new mobile devices. The sole device Apple sells that still retains the old jack is 2021's 9th generation iPad.

The decision is likely to be less controversial now than it was seven years ago, as Apple has proven to be right about the move to wireless headphones. Or at least it's right in the sense that all rival manufacturers have now copied it.

It's arguable that Apple was self-serving in making the decision, because the company later became so dominant in wireless headphones with its AirPods range.

There are still many cases where a wired connection is better than a wireless one, such as for musicians and people working in education. For those people, Apple sells a pair of headphone $9 adapters, one for USB-C, and one for Lightning.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 36
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    You probably don't have kids. I'm not giving them wireless phones that they lose because they are so small and expensive. You want to buy rugged, wired headphones that require no Bluetooth setup. 

    The removal of the jack is dumb, like many of the design choices Apple made for both iPads this year. The regular iPad is THE choice for kids, and they just removed something that is super popular for parents. 
    waveparticleOfermuthuk_vanalingamTheObannonFileretrogustograndact73h2pwilliamlondonmontrosemacsappleinsideruser
  • Reply 2 of 36
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,758member
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    Spot on.  They are the same folks that bitched about losing the Floppy drive, the CD drive, the DVD drive and cars with keys.  
    JP234williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 36
    MacPro said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    Spot on.  They are the same folks that bitched about losing the Floppy drive, the CD drive, the DVD drive and cars with keys.  
    I miss the DVD drive. 
    JP234retrogustotokyojimumpantonebaconstang
  • Reply 4 of 36
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,737member
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    You probably don't have kids. I'm not giving them wireless phones that they lose because they are so small and expensive. You want to buy rugged, wired headphones that require no Bluetooth setup. 
    I have a kid who ruined many pairs of wired headphones by yanking them out of the socket the wrong way and/or having the iPad drop with the headphones connected. You can get cheap BT headphones for around the same price as wired these days. There's really no difference aside from the 30 seconds it takes to pair them.
    JP234roundaboutnowchiamontrosemacsdewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 36
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    jimh2williamlondonbaconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 36
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    They'll take it off the MacBooks next, which is funnily enough the device where I have the least use for it.  

    At least they sell a USB-C to 3.5mm adaptor.  Annoying though.
    retrogustobaconstangdewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 36
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,737member
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    williamlondondewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 36
    HrebHreb Posts: 84member
    Just bought a 5th generation ipod mini, instead of the current 6th generation, for primarily this reason.
    edited October 2022 waveparticlewatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 36
    jimh2jimh2 Posts: 633member
    auxio said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    A phone is not a serious audio device and bluetooth still sucks. As long as they keep a port that can be converted to a headphone jack I'll be content.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 36
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,737member
    jimh2 said:
    auxio said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    A phone is not a serious audio device and bluetooth still sucks. As long as they keep a port that can be converted to a headphone jack I'll be content.
    A phone/tablet is just a computer in a different package. There's nothing which prevents doing "serious audio" as long as it has a port which can connect to a decent audio I/O device. There are quite a few which work with iPads. Not to mention that I've been fairly impressed with the quality/latency of wireless MIDI devices these days.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 36
    auxio said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    Sigh, I saw this one coming. People that are "serious" use the tools that work best for them. I use my iPad in a similar way to how a person would have used a 4-track. It's any easy way to start catering ideas, it's super portable and it has long battery life.

    As for your points:

    1. People buy dedicated I/O interface. Yes, and I have one for my guitar/bass that connects to the iPad. 
    2. Audio quality: When it comes to recording I don't care what the sound quality of the click track is. I also don't need high quality audio to work on an arrangement, or to lay down additional tracks. 
    3. You can't separate your tracks: Huh? GarageBand supports up to 256 tracks. I'm not sure how it takes longer to record individual tracks on an iPad. I can't currently play more than instrument at a time so recording individual tracks is how I record no matter if I'm using an iPad or a Mac. 
    4. It's really only for people that dabble: Gorillaz recorded an entire album on an iPad. There are also no shortage of artists that have recoded songs on iPads or iPhones. Other than being objectively incorrect, you argument has another problem. You are basically saying hobbyist should matter as customers That is just goofy. 

    There is a saying, "Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those doing it."

    Anyway, my points stands. People working with audio would benefit form the headphone jack. Is it insurmountable or a deal breaker? No, but that wasn't the question asked. 



    edited October 2022 muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonbaconstangdewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 36
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    jimh2 said:
    auxio said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    A phone is not a serious audio device and bluetooth still sucks. As long as they keep a port that can be converted to a headphone jack I'll be content.
    An iPad is not a phone?
  • Reply 13 of 36
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,737member
    auxio said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    Sigh, I saw this one coming. People that are "serious" use the tools that work best for them. I use my iPad in a similar way to how a person would have used a 4-track. It's any easy way to start catering ideas, it's super portable and it has long battery life.

    As for your points:

    1. People buy dedicated I/O interface. Yes, and I have one for my guitar/bass that connects to the iPad. 
    2. Audio quality: When it comes to recording I don't care what the sound quality of the click track is. I also don't need high quality audio to work on an arrangement, or to lay down additional tracks. 
    3. You can't separate your tracks: Huh? GarageBand supports up to 256 tracks. I'm not sure how it takes longer to record individual tracks on an iPad. I can't currently play more than instrument at a time so recording individual tracks is how I record no matter if I'm using an iPad or a Mac. 
    4. It's really only for people that dabble: Gorillaz recorded an entire album on an iPad. There are also no shortage of artists that have recoded songs on iPads or iPhones. 

    There is a saying, "Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those doing it."
    I've been a computer-based music production enthusiast ever since the days of installing PCI bus audio I/O cards. So I understand very well using whatever works for you. Heck, at one point I carried around a Nintendo DS and used the Korg DS-10 app to capture music ideas on the go.

    My point about being able to separate audio tracks: once you have a song on the iPad which is made up of several sounds (guitar, bass, vocal, drums, etc), what do you do with them after that? If you're just recording it straight to a completely mixed song, then you're fine. However, if you need to do some mastering/post-production such as frequency filtering, ducking, effects, compression, etc, then you want to have the individual sounds and not the complete mix. If you only have a single audio output, you're stuck recording each track one at a time (or two if they're mono sounds). Whereas if you have a 4/8/16 channel audio output device, you can record them all at once (and at higher quality).

    Time is money when it comes to the studio. I'd be willing to bet that, when it came time for mastering their tracks for release, the Gorillaz weren't using the headphone jack to get their sounds off the iPad.
    edited October 2022 williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 36
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 1,118member
    The point for those who object to this decision is that Apple is intentionally removing a feature that is meaningful for a minority of users, presumably to force them to do things in a way that is beneficial to Apple, but it only really benefits Apple if it succeeds in inconveniencing some customers. The removal of the jack may save a few pennies on each $449+ device, but we all know that’s not why Apple is doing this. Courage? Haha. It’s to encourage the purchase of AirPods, which probably have excellent margins and have to be replaced every few years because they contain batteries that don’t last forever. Some of us would rather spend the money on something that probably sounds better and will be enjoyable for many years to come. Even wired earbuds that cost more than AirPods probably end up being less expensive over the life of the product.

    Of course, there will always be some people who won’t understand why other people like to do things their own way. Apple used to even market itself as the brand for people who like to do things their own way.
    williamlondonwaveparticlebaconstangRobSRand
  • Reply 15 of 36
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,737member
    Anyway, my points stands. People working with audio would benefit form the headphone jack. Is it insurmountable or a deal breaker? No, but that wasn't the question asked. 
    There is one scenario where I see the loss of the headphone jack as being a problem for on-the-go musicians: being able to listen to what you already have (or a click track) while you record another track (e.g. a vocal), without requiring a separate audio device or adapter for listening which you may not have with you. I see now that this is the scenario you're focused on. And I agree, the lag from wireless headphones will make it so that what you're recording is out of sync with what's playing.

    I admit that I'm pretty terrible at being perfectly in time with my live recordings of anything, so I'm just used to having to go back and fix up my mistakes. In this case, adjusting the new recording so that it matches the existing recording after-the-fact. But I can see how this would be annoying for someone who is actually a good live performer, so I apologize for not seeing it at first take.
    muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 36
    geekmeegeekmee Posts: 631member
    I miss my Etch-A-Sketch.
    baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 36
    auxio said:
    auxio said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    Anyone who seriously works with audio buys a digital audio I/O interface. While Apple's mini jack is better than most when it comes to shielding against noise from interference, the quality still isn't nearly as good as a separate audio interface. Combine that with the fact that you can't separate your tracks (so you have to record each one individually if you want to bring them into another audio editor/mixer, taking far more time), and it's really only people who dabble with music production who used it.

    Now on the other hand, DJs who used to split the audio output into separate mono channels for mixing are REALLY upset about this...  :p
    Sigh, I saw this one coming. People that are "serious" use the tools that work best for them. I use my iPad in a similar way to how a person would have used a 4-track. It's any easy way to start catering ideas, it's super portable and it has long battery life.

    As for your points:

    1. People buy dedicated I/O interface. Yes, and I have one for my guitar/bass that connects to the iPad. 
    2. Audio quality: When it comes to recording I don't care what the sound quality of the click track is. I also don't need high quality audio to work on an arrangement, or to lay down additional tracks. 
    3. You can't separate your tracks: Huh? GarageBand supports up to 256 tracks. I'm not sure how it takes longer to record individual tracks on an iPad. I can't currently play more than instrument at a time so recording individual tracks is how I record no matter if I'm using an iPad or a Mac. 
    4. It's really only for people that dabble: Gorillaz recorded an entire album on an iPad. There are also no shortage of artists that have recoded songs on iPads or iPhones. 

    There is a saying, "Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those doing it."
    I've been a computer-based music production enthusiast ever since the days of installing PCI bus audio I/O cards. So I understand very well using whatever works for you. Heck, at one point I carried around a Nintendo DS and used the Korg DS-10 app to capture music ideas on the go.

    My point about being able to separate audio tracks: once you have a song on the iPad which is made up of several sounds (guitar, bass, vocal, drums, etc), what do you do with them after that? If you're just recording it straight to a completely mixed song, then you're fine. However, if you need to do some mastering/post-production such as frequency filtering, ducking, effects, compression, etc, then you want to have the individual sounds and not the complete mix. If you only have a single audio output, you're stuck recording each track one at a time (or two if they're mono sounds). Whereas if you have a 4/8/16 channel audio output device, you can record them all at once (and at higher quality).

    Time is money when it comes to the studio. I'd be willing to bet that, when it came time for mastering their tracks for release, the Gorillaz weren't using the headphone jack to get their sounds off the iPad.
    I responded to this post before reading your second post. Sounds like you get where I'm coming from on this one. 
    edited October 2022 watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 36

    JP234 said:
    JP234 said:
    This is sure to bring out the trolls, claiming they will never buy another iPad.

    But at this point, who needs the audio jack anyway? You have legacy earbuds? Get new ones. Get Bluetooth ones. Or buy a cheapo adapter. You say the audio quality is too low over Bluetooth? Well, you should be using a high end stereo system, that has both the 35mm and 1/4" audio jacks, not an iPad.
    People that work with audio. I will use my iPad Pro for recording keyboard, guitar/bass and drums. The latency with Bluetooth is too high and can't be used to for monitoring what you are recording. So I end up having to use the built in speakers. That Apple has GarageBand on the iPad and this limitation is kind of a bummer. I also get that the people that do what I am doing are in the minority and Apple isn't going to keep the headphone jack for us. Side note, there is a group of people that complain that Logic and FCPX aren't on the iPad.... there is your answer. Both would be gimped by the lack of headphone jack.
    I have a MUCH better solution for you: the new iPads have a USB-C connector. Plug in a set of USB-C headphones. So what's the next objection?
    I have a MUCH better idea for you: Read the posts you are responding to. The USB-C port is in use with the instrument I am trying to monitor. 
    RobSRandcrowleybaconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 36
    I don't mean to be a troll, but this iPad seems really dumb... 

    I'm the executive of a K-8 school that buys hundreds of iPads. The general funding price point for the device, the warranty and the case is $400. In the past, we enjoyed working with Apple because they bundled their products to meet this price point and which low income schools could get reimbursements through different federal programs so that low income students could enjoy the Apple tech. 

    Now, not only is the iPad over a hundred dollars more than the federal reimbursement level, we can't use our $9 headphones anymore and are forced to buy battery powered headphones for triple that cost.

    I don't think we can afford iPads anymore.
    waveparticlebaconstangmuthuk_vanalingamdewme
  • Reply 20 of 36
    auxio said:
    Anyway, my points stands. People working with audio would benefit form the headphone jack. Is it insurmountable or a deal breaker? No, but that wasn't the question asked. 
    There is one scenario where I see the loss of the headphone jack as being a problem for on-the-go musicians: being able to listen to what you already have (or a click track) while you record another track (e.g. a vocal), without requiring a separate audio device or adapter for listening which you may not have with you. I see now that this is the scenario you're focused on. And I agree, the lag from wireless headphones will make it so that what you're recording is out of sync with what's playing.

    I admit that I'm pretty terrible at being perfectly in time with my live recordings of anything, so I'm just used to having to go back and fix up my mistakes. In this case, adjusting the new recording so that it matches the existing recording after-the-fact. But I can see how this would be annoying for someone who is actually a good live performer, so I apologize for not seeing it at first take.
    Right, the challenge. Probably made worse by the fact that I don't like to play with monitoring turned off. So the delay in playing a chord on the guitar and hearing it just throws me. Same with keyboard or drums. And like I said, it isn't insurmountable. I work around it but I wouldn't complain if they added the headphone jack. 

    Another place it is challenging is my kid is learning to play keyboard using Simply Piano. It's uses midi to show you where you are off on the sheet music. But same problem with wireless headphones. If he depends on the click track an backing tracks his playing is all off. So, he uses the speakers. Its a workable situation but would be nice to have the headphone jack. 
    baconstangwatto_cobra
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