Kensington's new SlimBlade Pro Trackball is ergonomic & ambidextrous

Posted:
in General Discussion edited November 2022
Kensington's new SlimBlade Pro Trackball provides users with an ergonomic way to navigate their Mac or another computer.

Kensington SlimBlade Pro Trackball
Kensington SlimBlade Pro Trackball


The plug-and-play SlimBlade Pro offers connectivity through Bluetooth, 2.4GHz wireless, or a wired option. It has a rechargeable battery that offers up to four months of usage, per charge -- and it charges with USB-C.

The large, 55mm trackball lets users scroll up and down through webpages and documents with a twist for precision movement. Dual optical sensors track the ball to provide accurate and responsive cursor tracking and scrolling.

Kensington designed the product for nearly anyone with its ambidextrous design that requires little hand and wrist movement, making it comfortable during extended use.

Right-handed and left-handed people can use the SlimBlade Pro Trackball
Right-handed and left-handed people can use the SlimBlade Pro Trackball


Users can customize the device with the free KensingtonWorks software. It can assign various program functions to each of the Trackball's four individual and combo buttons.

The software package for the trackball is available for macOS 10.4 Mojave and later, and the company provides a separate download for legacy Mac versions.

It's not clear if the package is Apple Silicon native or not. We have reached out to the company to find out, and will update accordingly.

The SlimBlade Pro also features 128-bit AES encryption to provide security that deters hackers from monitoring the wireless connection and capturing sensitive information.

SlimBlade Pro Trackball - Pricing & Availability

The SlimBlade Pro Trackball is available to order for $119.99 on Amazon and through Kensington's website for the same price.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    I had the Kensington Turbo Mouse for years (a couple of them, actually) back in the pre-USB days of Apple Desktop Bus connectivity in 1990s Macs, if memory serves. Great products. I'm glad to see that they've modernized it — well, assuming that it works natively with Apple Silicon-based Macs. I used one through Apple's odd-design mouse days (like the original iMac's hockey puck and the wired Mighty Mouse, whose miniature scroll ball got gummed up too easily) … but when the Apple Magic Mouse was first released (a couple years after the first iPhone, as you'll recall), its multitouch surface won me over instantly and I've never looked back.

    This new Kensington SlimBlade Pro Trackball will find a market. They were smart to make it work both wirelessly and wired. One of my friends sticks with her old Mighty Mouse because she hates the idea of having to recharge a mouse.
    watto_cobraFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 2 of 8
    Curious to know if anyone uses a trackball these days, and for what market. Seems odd to keep something alive if it doesn't have a market.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 8
    Recording studios, video editing. Trackball is just a better experience than a trackpad. 
    baconstangFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 4 of 8
    Page layout mainly, but also a bit of Photoshop, audio editing, word processing, spreadsheets, etc. Mine is a Turbo Mouse. Much easier on my wrists than a mouse, especially when using it for an extended amount of time. I also like the scroll wheel and the multiple buttons and button combinations.
    baconstangwatto_cobraFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 5 of 8
    Curious to know if anyone uses a trackball these days, and for what market. Seems odd to keep something alive if it doesn't have a market.

    What these people said:
    Recording studios, video editing. Trackball is just a better experience than a trackpad. 
    Page layout mainly, but also a bit of Photoshop, audio editing, word processing, spreadsheets, etc. Mine is a Turbo Mouse. Much easier on my wrists than a mouse, especially when using it for an extended amount of time. I also like the scroll wheel and the multiple buttons and button combinations.

    It also helps with my carpal tunnel a bit.  May look into this one; my old Logitech one is wearing out.
  • Reply 6 of 8
    Holy crap! What year is this? I was a Kensington trackball devotee through much of the 90s. Until the Microsoft Trackball Explorer came out 22-ish years ago. Those things became a cult. Especially after Microsoft discontinued them after a few years. They went for as much as $800 on eBay at one point. 

    I finally gave mine up around 12 years ago and went to the Magic Mouse, and later the Magic Trackpad. The Microsoft software became really buggy on Intel Macs and the two I had are now sitting in a closet.

    Until a year or so ago, I would alternate between the Magic Mouse and the Trackpad to reduce hand fatigue, but I started getting pain in my hand with the Magic Mouse. I think it was the repetitive grip action that did it.

    I'm thinking of getting one of these new Kensingtons as an alt to my Magic Trackpad.

  • Reply 7 of 8
    I used to far prefer trackballs over mice. Then came the Magic Trackpad and BetterTouchTool. The ability to perform lots of different functions without having to reach for the keyboard means I'll never, ever go back.
  • Reply 8 of 8
    pscooter63pscooter63 Posts: 1,067member
    Curious to know if anyone uses a trackball these days, and for what market. Seems odd to keep something alive if it doesn't have a market.

    What these people said:
    Recording studios, video editing. Trackball is just a better experience than a trackpad. 
    Page layout mainly, but also a bit of Photoshop, audio editing, word processing, spreadsheets, etc. Mine is a Turbo Mouse. Much easier on my wrists than a mouse, especially when using it for an extended amount of time. I also like the scroll wheel and the multiple buttons and button combinations.

    It also helps with my carpal tunnel a bit.  May look into this one; my old Logitech one is wearing out.

    Missle Command.
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