Apple engaged in illegal anti-union tactics, finds labor board

Posted:
in General Discussion
The National Labor Relations Board has evidence that Apple used anti-union tactics to try to stop unionization efforts, including interrogating and coercing employees.

Apple Cumberland Mall
Apple Cumberland Mall


Apple has long been suspected of engaging in anti-union tactics, especially at its Atlanta, Georgia, location. In May, Apple Cumberland Mall retail workers accused the company of countering an ongoing union drive.

That same month, the workers dropped the union vote request, saying that Apple "conducted a systematic, sophisticated campaign to intimidate them and interfere with their right to form a union."

Now, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has determined that Apple violated federal law by holding mandatory anti-union meetings, reports Bloomberg, At the meetings, management made coercive statements to employees seeking to unionize.

The Atlanta regional director of the NLRB will issue a complaint if Apple doesn't settle with its employees.

In October, Apple received a complaint from the NLRB over accusations of union-busting at a New York City store.

In November, Apple's retail store in the St. Louis Galleria Mall dropped its bid to unionize, blaming the company's hostility towards such efforts.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    One would think that Apple has on retainer attorneys that are experts in labor law to avoid these sorts of problems.
    JFC_PAbaconstangbeowulfschmidtdarkvader
  • Reply 2 of 9
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 862member
    Individual store management given too much autonomy beyond the HQ lawyers review?
  • Reply 3 of 9
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,616member
    It's interesting to see Apple go this far against the unionization of its retail employees. I'm not sure what Apple's management is so afraid of.
    grandact73darkvader
  • Reply 4 of 9
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 862member
    Management not eager to cede any control over their successful retail stores to a union experienced in representing machinists and aerospace workers?

    In addition to a very typical control-freakness which is sorta the Apple brand. 
    edited December 2022 h2p
  • Reply 5 of 9
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 2,582member
    When it was just random accusations from those engaging in failed unionization efforts, I could shrug it off. Consider the source. 
    But this is the agency that defines what is legal and illegal. Now that the NLRB has agreed that Apple has engaged in illegal anti union tactics, that changes things. That is seriously uncool. Apple needs to step up and admit they f-ed up, and work to redress the wrongs. Sadly, I fear that todays modern, giant Apple Corp is likely not capable of doing this. 
    edited December 2022 darkvader
  • Reply 6 of 9
    chasm said:
    It's interesting to see Apple go this far against the unionization of its retail employees. I'm not sure what Apple's management is so afraid of.
    The laziness that's comes with unions.
  • Reply 7 of 9
    MadbumMadbum Posts: 436member
    NRLB always finds for one side no Matter what
  • Reply 8 of 9
    danoxdanox Posts: 1,527member
    pjohnt said:
    chasm said:
    It's interesting to see Apple go this far against the unionization of its retail employees. I'm not sure what Apple's management is so afraid of.
    The laziness that's comes with unions.

    Never learn:

    To think the 40 hour work week as we know it in the United States is only about 108 years old…. 


     “On 5 January 1914 the Ford Motor Company took the radical step of doubling pay to $5 a day (adjusted for inflation: $129.55 as of 2020) and cut shifts from nine hours to eight, moves that were not popular with rival companies, although seeing the increase in Ford's productivity, and a significant increase in profit margin (from $30 million to $60 million in two years), most soon followed suit. 


     In the summer of 1915, amid increased labor demand for World War I, a series of strikes demanding the eight-hour day began in Bridgeport, Connecticut. They were so successful that they spread throughout the Northeast. The United States Adamson Act in 1916 established an eight-hour day, with additional pay for overtime, for railroad workers. This was the first federal law that regulated the hours of workers in private companies. The United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Act in Wilson v. New, 243 U.S. 332 (1917). 


     The eight-hour day might have been realized for many working people in the US in 1937, when what became the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S. Code Chapter 8) was first proposed under the New Deal. As enacted, the act applied to industries whose combined employment represented about twenty percent of the US labor force. In those industries, it set the maximum workweek at 40 hours, but provided that employees working beyond 40 hours a week would receive additional overtime bonus salaries.”


     Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-hour_day#United_States


    People forget Unions are the main reason for most of the benefits all workers get in the US. The fight started not long after 1776….

    darkvadermuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 9
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,714member
    pjohnt said:
    chasm said:
    It's interesting to see Apple go this far against the unionization of its retail employees. I'm not sure what Apple's management is so afraid of.
    The laziness that's comes with unions.
    The drive for unions typically has instigating factors. Unfortunately for many unions it’s more about the power of the union than it is about the workers and they do more to protect people who should be fired instead of protected. I wish there was a middle ground somewhere. Unions are an answer to management but they aren’t a solution.
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