Freedom of Religion

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
So all the talk I've been hearing has been about the reconstruction of Iraq. My question is: will there be freedom of religion?



I doubt it. In all honesty, freedom of religion is not a tenet of Islam. (I studied the rise of Islam in college.) So how "free" will Iraq be? Opinions?



Personally, I have no problems with someone being Muslim, as long as they are willing and sincere. How many people in the Middle East would convert (not necessarily to Christianity either) if they didn't have a gun pointed at their heads? Rebuttals?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    mrmistermrmister Posts: 1,095member
    Hard to say. There aren't any arab democracies either, so it is difficult to tell how things will be panning out.



    Though if they manage a democracy, there may be some kind of religious tolerance, as there are a number of competing sects and faiths in Iraq...and not all are small enough to be easily marginalized.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,122member
    There is many religions in Iraq already, including Christians. Iraq is built on a Mozaique of tribes, which various religions, Shiite, sunnites, christians .... Unlike Iran, Iraq people are not very big about religions. I doubt that Iraq will become a theocratic (read muslim) state like Iran.
  • Reply 3 of 14
    newnew Posts: 3,244member
    What kind of freedom of religion are you talking about?



    Will iraq remain a "quasi-secular" state?



    Will it be more secular (like turkey)?



    Or less (with a state religion, sunni or shi'a)?





    I don't get the question.
  • Reply 4 of 14
    der kopfder kopf Posts: 2,275member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by New

    What kind of freedom of religion are you talking about?





    I think he meant the kind of freedom that allows you to be a christian, or a buddhist, or whatever, and not be prosecuted for it.
  • Reply 5 of 14
    newnew Posts: 3,244member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by der Kopf

    I think he meant the kind of freedom that allows you to be a christian, or a buddhist, or whatever, and not be prosecuted for it.



    oh, like the right you had in Iraq before the war?
  • Reply 6 of 14
    der kopfder kopf Posts: 2,275member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by New

    oh, like the right you had in Iraq before the war?



    Hey, don't shoot the pianist. I have not offered my opinion on the matter at hand, only on what the original poster might have said.
  • Reply 7 of 14
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by New

    oh, like the right you had in Iraq before the war?



    You mean like the right that killed off most of the Jews in Iraq? That one? I'm sure you like it.
  • Reply 8 of 14
    newnew Posts: 3,244member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Scott

    You mean like the right that killed off most of the Jews in Iraq? That one? I'm sure you like it.



    Most jews in iraq wern't killed, ignorant.
  • Reply 9 of 14
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Fangorn

    In all honesty, freedom of religion is not a tenet of Islam.



    I can't think of any really succesful religion that says it's okay not to believe in it, especially not as a core value of the religion. In fact the fast spreading ones are those that encourage their members to seek out converts.



    If you're talking historically then I believe muslims have a record of getting along with other religions on a par with christians, for example.



    Since history doesn't support your the claim that Islam and religious freedom are incompatible then perhaps a better question would be what, if anything, has changed about these Islam and other religions and their respective followers if you now claim one to be more (or less) able to get along with other religions.



    I was going to post an informative link from the where is raed? weblog about the rise of fundamentalism in Iraq since the end of the first Persian Gulf Distraction but the site appears dead. I'll perhaps try again later.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    Quote:

    Originally posted by New

    Most jews in iraq wern't killed, ignorant.



    thats true.. only the ones that didnt leave quick enough.

  • Reply 11 of 14
    newnew Posts: 3,244member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by The General

    thats true.. only the ones that didnt leave quick enough.





    You can call it what you want.



    I'm not claiming that the conditions for jews in Iraqi wern't bad during events in the region that led to the establishment of Israel and the following wars.



    But Scotts claim, that most were killed, is totally untrue.



    A jewish history-page on the jews of iraq...
  • Reply 12 of 14
    i think we can say fundamentalists of all religions aren't very tolerant.

    don't isolate it to islam.
  • Reply 13 of 14
    Quote:

    Originally posted by superkarate monkeydeathcar

    don't isolate it to islam



    But its so much easier to back up a simplistic and racist worldview if we do.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,122member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by New

    You can call it what you want.



    I'm not claiming that the conditions for jews in Iraqi wern't bad during events in the region that led to the establishment of Israel and the following wars.



    But Scotts claim, that most were killed, is totally untrue.



    A jewish history-page on the jews of iraq...




    Yes , but they have been largely persecuted. Not strange if you consider that the Hitlerian system was a model for Saddam, like Staline who was his model.

    The yellow identity cards and others, are directly inspired by the Nazis. Only international public opinion have prevented him to kill of them, emigrate then in an another countrie was simplier ...



    Thanks for that link New, i have learn something today. I wish that i will learn something more positive tomorrow.
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