Apple's MagSafe is foundation for new Qi2 wireless charging standard

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2023
Apple has provided MagSafe as the basis for the upcoming wireless charging standard Qi2, making it universal across platforms.

MagSafe goes universal with Qi2
MagSafe goes universal with Qi2


The Wireless Power Consortium has announced that Qi2, pronounced "chee two," will replace the existing wireless charging standard in 2023. Apple has provided MagSafe as the basis for Qi2, which should lead to more universal interoperability of accessories and chargers.

"Energy efficiency and sustainability are on everyone's minds these days," says Paul Struhsaker, executive director of the Wireless Power Consortium. "Qi2's perfect alignment improves energy efficiency by reducing the energy loss that can happen when the phone or the charger is not aligned."

"Just as important, Qi2 will greatly reduce the landfill waste associated with wired charger replacement due to plugs breaking and the stress placed on cords from daily connecting and disconnecting," he added.

MagSafe for iPhone was introduced as a new accessory and charging system for iPhone 12 and newer. The magnetic charging puck offers 15W wireless charging to the iPhone via a high-efficiency magnetic connection.

Once Qi2 launches, compatible smartphones will be able to take advantage of Apple's MagSafe charging. The universal standard goes both ways as well, enabling accessory makers to make more products that fit both iPhone and Android products.

The Magnetic Power Profile ensures products are perfectly aligned with charging pads. That translates to improved energy efficiency and faster charging.

The new Qi2 standard will launch in 2023, with new products expected by the holiday season. Apple's iPhone 15 is a likely candidate for the new standard, though it may not be distinguishable from the existing MagSafe system.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    Unless, of course, EU bureaucrats decide to mandate something else. I would imagine using an Apple specification as a standard would burn their asses to no end.
    edited January 2023 Anilu_777williamlondonCesar Battistini Mazierojas99watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 9
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 1,118member
    If "Energy efficiency and sustainability are on everyone's minds these days," why didn’t they make the laptop MagSafe the standard? It uses fewer materials (which probably includes smaller rare-earth magnets), takes up less space during shipping and ever after, and transfers 100% of the power to the device being charged. It’s just way better, apart from possibly seeming less futuristic to the simple-minded. I know the subject here is a “wireless” consortium, which technically answers my question, but it’s like a coal consortium claiming to be focused on carbon footprints. 
    edited January 2023 Anilu_777fred1watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 9
    I could see a world where MagSafe could theoretically replace lightning ‘if’ the receiving hardware could fit in a super thin iPhone. But the  EU standard of USB-C has now killed that. 

    Qi2 is, as you said, wireless. MagSafe won’t let me drop my phone on a pad in my car and have it charge without having to fuss with wires and replace them periodically because the connection wears out or the wire gets frayed. 
    longpathwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    If "Energy efficiency and sustainability are on everyone's minds these days," why didn’t they make the laptop MagSafe the standard? It uses fewer materials (which probably includes smaller rare-earth magnets), takes up less space during shipping and ever after, and transfers 100% of the power to the device being charged. It’s just way better, apart from possibly seeming less futuristic to the simple-minded. I know the subject here is a “wireless” consortium, which technically answers my question, but it’s like a coal consortium claiming to be focused on carbon footprints. 
    I believe the point you are overlooking is that the contacts are exposed with such a system as is used on the laptops, which runs contrary to the objective of sealing the portable device as much as possible to protect it from common operational hazards that are commonplace for a mobile device. If you've never had water infiltrate the charging port on a portable device and been unable to charge it despite it being on the brink of flatlining, you might not understand the advantage of inductive charging for a portable device; but having experienced that exact issue as well as having dealt with degradation of contacts on a device exposed to high humidity as part of its normal operating conditions, a Polar V800 sports watch, I can assure you that there is more to be considered under the rubric of efficiency than the factors you listed.
    lordjohnwhorfindoozydozenchiawatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 9
    Amazing news! Now we will have even more MagSafe accessories! 
    h4y3sJapheydoozydozencaladanianjellybellywatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 9
    fred1fred1 Posts: 1,116member
     I could see a world where MagSafe could theoretically replace lightning ‘if’ the receiving hardware could fit in a super thin iPhone. But the  EU standard of USB-C has now killed that.”

    You miss two points here. 1. The EU is not mandating that every device be charged with aUSB-C, only that it be the only type of plug. 2. Many of us don’t want to use wireless charging with its slower charge time and being no more convenient than plugging something in as well as the problems when a base is used. 

    And a question: when will they make a MagSafe charger that works with the Apple Watch as well as the iPhone and AirPods?
    edited January 2023 caladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 9
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,753member
    This is probably the wisest decision that was open to Apple.

    The EU specifically said that wireless charging was not being targeted in its common charging plans because the wireless charging market was not fragmented to the same degree as wired charging. 

    The problem is that, without doubt, the wireless charging market will become fragmented at some point and then the EU would have to deal with the problem and a proprietary system would not have got out of the gate.

    By offering the system to be included in the second generation of Qi charging Apple has more options of seeing Qi2 being chosen by the EU if things come to a crunch.

    I'm sure the move was never ever on Apple’s original roadmap for Magsafe and the EU's common charging legislation was a wake up call.

    The current downside to this is that Qi2 will be born at very slow charging speeds even by current standards.

    Wired charging is still the speed king and will be for quite some time but wireless charging is the convenience king. 

    Ironically, my experience with wireless charging on the claimed advantages of wear and tear and stress is not great, with wired charging winning out. I've had two RAV Power wireless chargers die on me and the third is Anker which is still working OK at the moment. Wireless chargers have the exact same elements as wired chargers (connectors, cables, charger) so the e-waste claims don't really mean too much. 

    Periodically the wife's XR stops wireless charging and needs to be restarted to get it working again. 
    ravnorodom
  • Reply 8 of 9
    fred1fred1 Posts: 1,116member
     Wired charging is still the speed king and will be for quite some time but wireless charging is the convenience king. ”

    I honestly don’t see how wireless charging is more convenient. When using a cable, it’s the difference between slapping the charger on the back of the device and plugging in a cable. When using a wireless charging stand, if you want to look at the device you have to pick it up and that interrupts the charging. Plus, as you mention, the difference in charging speed.

    Of course this is just my (sometimes) humble opinion, and I’d like to understand this better. 
    ravnorodomwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 9 of 9
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,753member
    fred1 said:
    “ Wired charging is still the speed king and will be for quite some time but wireless charging is the convenience king. ”

    I honestly don’t see how wireless charging is more convenient. When using a cable, it’s the difference between slapping the charger on the back of the device and plugging in a cable. When using a wireless charging stand, if you want to look at the device you have to pick it up and that interrupts the charging. Plus, as you mention, the difference in charging speed.

    Of course this is just my (sometimes) humble opinion, and I’d like to understand this better. 
    The convenience is in on-the-go charging (in a car setting for example you only need to put the phone into a holder and get driving), one handed use, use in dark environments and if you have any kind of dexterity issue.

    I only use wired charging because mine is ultra fast and even a short charge will see me through a normal day but wireless is definitely nice to have for some people. 

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