Kuo predicts spring debut for Apple mixed-reality headset

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2023
Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has revised his prediction for the official debut of the highly anticipated Apple augmented reality device, suggesting that the company will now announce it in spring 2023.




According to the analyst, Apple still faces delays with its mixed-reality headset. He cites issues "with mechanical component drop testing and the availability of software development tools."

Because of this, it's increasingly unlikely that Apple would announce it during a January media event.

(2/3)
As a result, it is increasingly unlikely that Apple will hold a media event for the new device in January. At this point, it seems more likely that Apple will announce the AR/MR headset at a spring media event or WWDC based on the current development progress.

-- (Ming-Chi Kuo) (@mingchikuo)


Kuo predicts that the company will instead announce it during an Apple Event in spring or during the annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June.

While he believes that the device may be announced in the first half of 2023, he expects that it will not begin shipping until the end of the second or third quarter of 2023.

In December, Apple reportedly changed the name of its mixed-reality operating system to "xrOS," signaling that the company could be close to releasing a mixed-reality headset.

Currently anticipated to be in an "advanced" stage of development, Apple's first headset launch could include a pair of 4K OLED displays, 15 camera modules dotted around the outside, and potential support for eye tracking and hand gestures. The first wave could also be an expensive headset, with prices up to $3,000 proposed.


Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    fred1fred1 Posts: 1,120member
    Well, he would know!  :D
  • Reply 2 of 6
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,826member
    I can see Apple Horizon (or whatever) glasses launching at WWDC, hyping developers to build for it, with a new AR kit dropping at the same time. Tailored workshops and mentoring, and a product drop as soon as the fall, just in time to flood Christmas trees around the world. 
    goodbyeranchfred1
  • Reply 3 of 6
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,093member
    I still don't know what to think of this. Every product that Apple rumored or made since it was founded was sort of predictable what it was actually for. Other than a gaming device, I don't see this as a widely popular consumer device for anything but gaming. Specific industrial uses maybe, but that doesn't sell millions of them. Maybe it really is intended for gaming...and if that's the case...fine. I just won't have a use for it. Been a long time since I've had to say that. Heck, I even bought a Newton.
  • Reply 4 of 6
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,798member
    eightzero said:
    I still don't know what to think of this. Every product that Apple rumored or made since it was founded was sort of predictable what it was actually for. Other than a gaming device, I don't see this as a widely popular consumer device for anything but gaming. Specific industrial uses maybe, but that doesn't sell millions of them. Maybe it really is intended for gaming...and if that's the case...fine. I just won't have a use for it. Been a long time since I've had to say that. Heck, I even bought a Newton.
    There are almost infinite use cases for XR but true XR is not encapsulated in the same way as console gaming can be and when gaming went online, the demands on network infrastructure were manageable.

    For a good XR experience, the devices must be widely usable in different environments and that requires content support from third parties. A lot of third parties and XR is far more demanding in terms of resources. On device resources, network resources etc.

    Carrier infrastructure is not yet ready for moving huge amounts of high resolution, low latency XR data to and from users. In truth, it won't be until 5.5G is widely available that infrastructure will be able to become viable on a wide scale. 

    I would imagine that pricing would be a logical impediment to widespread early adoption or if a cheaper device were made available, perhaps it would be encapsulated to specific scenarios (gaming, training, educational...) 

    In terms of format support, I would think some kind of standard would come into play as opposed to a proprietary system. OpenXR maybe.


  • Reply 5 of 6
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,093member
    avon b7 said:
    eightzero said:
    I still don't know what to think of this. Every product that Apple rumored or made since it was founded was sort of predictable what it was actually for. Other than a gaming device, I don't see this as a widely popular consumer device for anything but gaming. Specific industrial uses maybe, but that doesn't sell millions of them. Maybe it really is intended for gaming...and if that's the case...fine. I just won't have a use for it. Been a long time since I've had to say that. Heck, I even bought a Newton.
    There are almost infinite use cases for XR ...

    I don't dispute this, but I simply can't think of any that would actually sell at a consumer level in any sort of economically viable numbers. A HUD for driving or sports? Shirley these would be useful, but how many could Apple really sell? What information does a consumer want to see overlayed on the real world that isn't a game of some sort? I guess I can't think different.

  • Reply 6 of 6
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,798member
    eightzero said:
    avon b7 said:
    eightzero said:
    I still don't know what to think of this. Every product that Apple rumored or made since it was founded was sort of predictable what it was actually for. Other than a gaming device, I don't see this as a widely popular consumer device for anything but gaming. Specific industrial uses maybe, but that doesn't sell millions of them. Maybe it really is intended for gaming...and if that's the case...fine. I just won't have a use for it. Been a long time since I've had to say that. Heck, I even bought a Newton.
    There are almost infinite use cases for XR ...

    I don't dispute this, but I simply can't think of any that would actually sell at a consumer level in any sort of economically viable numbers. A HUD for driving or sports? Shirley these would be useful, but how many could Apple really sell? What information does a consumer want to see overlayed on the real world that isn't a game of some sort? I guess I can't think different.

    Those cases already exist but are a little more specialised. For example a museum could use overlaid information for visitors. Training facilities could use overlaid information. Technicians use overlaid information. There are uses in medicine. The security services etc. 

    For widespread use though, content is key and that would have to be standards based because I very much doubt creators will want to target just one platform or create for various. 

    Leisure activities such as gaming and media consumption would be decent hooks to attract users initially but things can't be limited to that. More options would need to be available later. 

    Price would be a good obstacle to entry and would allow for the product to reach the real world in smaller numbers and allow for infrastructure providers to scale backbone services to meet eventual demand. 

    Currently there isn't enough enough peak time bandwidth on offer to cater to open internet connections of XR. We are moving towards 8K streaming and other types of massive data transfers. 

    It's fine for the use cases I highlighted earlier because that data would be coming off private 5G installations or local wifi (but not the kind of Wi-Fi you have at home). 




    edited January 2023
Sign In or Register to comment.