Apple wants a bigger piece of the smart home hardware market

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple is setting its sights on the smart home market beyond the HomePod, and is reportedly prepping smart home accessories with screens, and a next-generation Apple TV.


The new display would function like a low-end iPad


Apple relaunched its larger HomePod on Wednesday, which boasts improved audio and better Siri integration.

The move signifies that Apple may be ready to tackle the smart home market and take on competitors like Amazon and Google.

According to Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad.

According to Bloomberg's sources, the tech giant has also discussed building larger smart-home displays. It's not clear how far along this initiative is, however.

The company is also looking into revamping the Apple TV in early 2024 with a faster processor, which could launch in the first half of 2024.

It's not clear why Apple would want to refresh the Apple TV so soon. The existing model already supports Matter and Thread on the high-end, and wide 8K content distribution is still several years away.

If the timetable is correct, it would be the shortest time between refreshes since the product initially launched.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    I look forward to Apple's entry, but I'd prefer sensors (motion, water, smoke, temperature, etc.) and bulbs (maybe even combining them with sensors) rather than more displays.

    Also, my home is already exclusively built with Thread, but I'm really tired of Siri telling me (daily) that there's a problem with some random bulb (or multiple bulbs) around the house. I can't recommend this technology to friends and family until it's reliable.

    Will Apple stop marketing products with the term "HomeKit" now since "Matter" is compatible with HomeKit? Or will Apple use both terms on future products?
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 21
    ...is Apple really after your data...?
    williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 21
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,213member
    ...is Apple really after your data...?
    No. JFC do you ever stop?
    lollivermbenz1962williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 21
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,213member
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    edited January 18 lolliverFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 21
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,772member
    Hey, maybe if Apple wants a bigger share of home computer gear they could make wifi equipment (eg the Apple Airport).) You know, the stuff everyone needs, wants, and Apple is very qualified to make secure and trustworthy with a built in Apple run VPN. 

    I'll buy a new Apple TV when it comes with a coax antenna jack that feeds an ATSC 3.0 tuner(s). Since that ain't happening, I don't see ever buying a new one. Apple wants people to pay for ATV+ subscriptions, not watch OTA broadcasts for free (like NFL games on CBS, Fox, NBC.) Unless...wait for it...ATV+ subscriptions come with bundled OTA DVR services. Given the plight of Aereo and Locast, I kinda don't see Apple wanting to take on that legal issue again.
    williamlondonFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 6 of 21
    An iPad with a mounting hook. Mind blown.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 21
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,530member
    ...is Apple really after your data...?
    No. JFC do you ever stop?
    Don't feed the paid shills. They're doing a fine job on their own making the anti-Apple crowd look idiotic.
    lollivermbenz1962williamlondonwatto_cobrafastasleep
  • Reply 8 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,508member
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    edited January 19 muthuk_vanalingamctt_zhFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 9 of 21
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,315member
    gatorguy said:
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    Note to AppleInsider: Please consider banning Google spammers as they are not paying you for advertising Google products on your platform. I think those advertisers who do pay would appreciate it.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 21
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,500member
    lkrupp said:
    gatorguy said:
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    Note to AppleInsider: Please consider banning Google spammers as they are not paying you for advertising Google products on your platform. I think those advertisers who do pay would appreciate it.
    Contrasting information is always a healthy practice. 

    It does not matter (no pun intended) how hard core on Apple you may be, information about the wider industry and competitors is always nice to have. 

    AI is not an Apple exclusive site, it is Apple centric. 

    As for this rumored move by Apple, it makes a lot of sense. IoT is the future. Abstracted hardware is the future. If Apple didn't move in that direction and the rest of the industry did, the experience would be lacking on many levels. 

    Is Apple ready for that future? Definitely not. Take a look at the design foundations of HarmonyOS. It has a lot of work ahead of it to make things 'just work' on an IoT level but moving in that direction is definitely a must. And IMO, a real Apple TV set has always been the gaping hole in the product matrix. 

    A screen that doesn't leave the house to manage certain aspects also makes sense but isn't an absolute requirement. It's just a nice accessory to have, hence the rumoured low cost for it. 
    muthuk_vanalingamctt_zhbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 11 of 21
    Revive AirPort like you did HomePod, please. 
    eightzerowilliamlondonwatto_cobraappleinsideruser
  • Reply 12 of 21
    danoxdanox Posts: 1,494member
    avon b7 said:
    lkrupp said:
    gatorguy said:
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    Note to AppleInsider: Please consider banning Google spammers as they are not paying you for advertising Google products on your platform. I think those advertisers who do pay would appreciate it.
    Contrasting information is always a healthy practice. 

    It does not matter (no pun intended) how hard core on Apple you may be, information about the wider industry and competitors is always nice to have. 

    AI is not an Apple exclusive site, it is Apple centric. 

    As for this rumored move by Apple, it makes a lot of sense. IoT is the future. Abstracted hardware is the future. If Apple didn't move in that direction and the rest of the industry did, the experience would be lacking on many levels. 

    Is Apple ready for that future? Definitely not. Take a look at the design foundations of HarmonyOS. It has a lot of work ahead of it to make things 'just work' on an IoT level but moving in that direction is definitely a must. And IMO, a real Apple TV set has always been the gaping hole in the product matrix. 

    A screen that doesn't leave the house to manage certain aspects also makes sense but isn't an absolute requirement. It's just a nice accessory to have, hence the rumoured low cost for it. 

    Apple is just gearing up as usual. The general market is not supporting Apple devices as usual, be it an iPhone, iPad, or a Mac, not in any cohesive manner. It is a Windows Android centric market first and foremost. (worldwide) which is why Apple has to roll up its sleeves time and time and again, and develop products to support its ecosystem. Because no one else will.

    Some version of the Airport Express, or Apple server will be developed. It’s obvious the market isn’t going to come up with anything that supports Apple devices in any significant way at least not in a way that works very well to what Apple would want. It’s Apple cpu, Apple Watch, Apple Pay, iMessage time, the general market is inadequate it’s time roll up those sleeves again Apple. 

    Appleinsider is an Apple site. It isn’t a Windows site, and it certainly is an Android site. Appleinsider also functions as a good Apple investment site too, much better than Seeking Alpha when it comes to Apple.
    edited January 19
  • Reply 13 of 21
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,500member
    danox said:
    avon b7 said:
    lkrupp said:
    gatorguy said:
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    Note to AppleInsider: Please consider banning Google spammers as they are not paying you for advertising Google products on your platform. I think those advertisers who do pay would appreciate it.
    Contrasting information is always a healthy practice. 

    It does not matter (no pun intended) how hard core on Apple you may be, information about the wider industry and competitors is always nice to have. 

    AI is not an Apple exclusive site, it is Apple centric. 

    As for this rumored move by Apple, it makes a lot of sense. IoT is the future. Abstracted hardware is the future. If Apple didn't move in that direction and the rest of the industry did, the experience would be lacking on many levels. 

    Is Apple ready for that future? Definitely not. Take a look at the design foundations of HarmonyOS. It has a lot of work ahead of it to make things 'just work' on an IoT level but moving in that direction is definitely a must. And IMO, a real Apple TV set has always been the gaping hole in the product matrix. 

    A screen that doesn't leave the house to manage certain aspects also makes sense but isn't an absolute requirement. It's just a nice accessory to have, hence the rumoured low cost for it. 

    Apple is just gearing up as usual. The general market is not supporting Apple devices as usual, be it an iPhone, iPad, or a Mac, not in any cohesive manner. It is a Windows Android centric market first and foremost. (worldwide) which is why Apple has to roll up its sleeves time and time and again, and develop products to support its ecosystem. Because no one else will.

    Some version of the Airport Express, or Apple server will be developed. It’s obvious the market isn’t going to come up with anything that supports Apple devices in any significant way at least not in a way that works very well to what Apple would want. It’s Apple cpu, Apple Watch, Apple Pay, iMessage time, the general market is inadequate it’s time roll up those sleeves again Apple. 

    Appleinsider is an Apple site. It isn’t a Windows site, and it certainly is an Android site. Appleinsider also functions as a good Apple investment site too, much better than Seeking Alpha when it comes to Apple.
    Definitely, but only to a point. Apple is probably somewhere between 'gearing up' and 'scrambling'.

    Companies tend to be wary when a bigger company tries to use its leverage for financial gain over them and more often than not, Apple isn't very flexible when it's comes to partnering with manufacturers. 

    The reasons may be warranted to a point but the upshot is that technologies like HomeKit probably didn't play out exactly how Apple would have liked in terms of uptake. 

    IoT is where everything is converging now (or will be over the next few years) and that will mean literally thousands of potential devices having to play nicely together. 

    That will involve Local, Edge and Cloud activities and, for some devices, an ever increasing amount of AI and 'sensing' capabilities. 

    That kind of scope is well out of Apple's range as a CE company so convergence and interoperability are the names of the game here. 

    Take video streaming as a 'simple' example.

    For the end user it is just a case of a wired or wireless connection and an app. That is it and Apple can (and does) manage that side of things. Perhaps overzealously in the eyes of some people. 

    However, Apple does not extend far beyond that up into the underlying backbone infrastructure.

    It is struggling to get a homebrew modem out the gate. They had to kiss and make up with Qualcomm (a massive strategic turnaround) and really had no other alternative to spend a billion dollars on some Intel IP, employees and patents. Good moves, and very necessary given the circumstances, but it should be evident that they were caught wrong footed on 5G. Just as well that 5G is a standard and Apple can use it even if they don't yet have the control they want. 

    They are having to roll their sleeves right up to their collective shoulders.

    Anyway, something like video streaming brings its own headaches that are well off your average Apple watcher's CE focused radar. This is just one example of many:

    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/huawei-cloud-becomes-a-franz-edelman-award-finalist-301724231.html

    Luckily Apple doesn't have to worry about any of that - at the moment - but that is where competitors are right now. 

    At some point someone is going to see that upstream development will be necessary. The 5G modem is just one little link on the chain. 

    The EU has already made IM interoperability a goal and it won't stop there. 

    Apple and Apple users stand to gain big time as a result (Matter and Thread come to mind) even if there is a side of the coin that isn't so shiny. Apple will probably end up having a less walled off ecosystem but more choice, interoperability, convergence etc are good for everyone. 

    I very much doubt it's various OSs are anywhere near ready for an interconnected IoT world but I'm convinced that behind the scenes someone is trying to remedy that. 

    Personally, and keeping to the local/CE side of things, I think Apple definitely needs a real TV, an Airport suite of products (but updated for the times) and a NAS for local storage/streaming. Those are doable now. 

    The automotive, AR/VR/XR, 5G modem and upstream efforts are all huge nuts to crack and will need time. 





    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 21
    avon b7 said:

    As for this rumored move by Apple, it makes a lot of sense. IoT is the future. Abstracted hardware is the future. If Apple didn't move in that direction and the rest of the industry did, the experience would be lacking on many levels. 

    Is Apple ready for that future? Definitely not. Take a look at the design foundations of HarmonyOS. It has a lot of work ahead of it to make things 'just work' on an IoT level but moving in that direction is definitely a must. And IMO, a real Apple TV set has always been the gaping hole in the product matrix. 

    A screen that doesn't leave the house to manage certain aspects also makes sense but isn't an absolute requirement. It's just a nice accessory to have, hence the rumoured low cost for it. 
    [emphasis added]

    Abstracted hardware isn't the key point - hardware abstraction has undergirded software development for more than half a century, and the benefits became self-evident very quickly. Software platforms became the point where value accrued: think Unix (which was not monetised) and Windows (which obviously was). Apple's approach of a more integrated system for dedicated computing has only worked because Apple did a better job of abstracting both hardware AND software into a computing process that appeals to enough people for the company to make money. Some people just want to drive a car and pay someone else to maintain it; if there's a car that needs next to no maintenance then that's desirable.

    Apple's approach of vertical integration won't work when it comes to IoT - there are just too many possible devices. So Apple went for the platform approach to try and capture the value: just as commoditising PC hardware led to the dominance of Windows, commoditising specialised sensor packages means the "operating system" will dominate. Apple's vision with HomeKit was to apply stringent privacy and security controls to try and prevent the dumpster fire of surveillance capitalism from getting worse. The tradeoff was the effort required from device manufacturers, which leads to higher prices, which leads to reduced demand from consumers.

    I believe the Matter standard is most likely going to take over and Apple will at some point sunset HomeKit. But my guess is that's a decade or more away.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 21
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,500member
    avon b7 said:

    As for this rumored move by Apple, it makes a lot of sense. IoT is the future. Abstracted hardware is the future. If Apple didn't move in that direction and the rest of the industry did, the experience would be lacking on many levels. 

    Is Apple ready for that future? Definitely not. Take a look at the design foundations of HarmonyOS. It has a lot of work ahead of it to make things 'just work' on an IoT level but moving in that direction is definitely a must. And IMO, a real Apple TV set has always been the gaping hole in the product matrix. 

    A screen that doesn't leave the house to manage certain aspects also makes sense but isn't an absolute requirement. It's just a nice accessory to have, hence the rumoured low cost for it. 
    [emphasis added]

    Abstracted hardware isn't the key point - hardware abstraction has undergirded software development for more than half a century, and the benefits became self-evident very quickly. Software platforms became the point where value accrued: think Unix (which was not monetised) and Windows (which obviously was). Apple's approach of a more integrated system for dedicated computing has only worked because Apple did a better job of abstracting both hardware AND software into a computing process that appeals to enough people for the company to make money. Some people just want to drive a car and pay someone else to maintain it; if there's a car that needs next to no maintenance then that's desirable.

    Apple's approach of vertical integration won't work when it comes to IoT - there are just too many possible devices. So Apple went for the platform approach to try and capture the value: just as commoditising PC hardware led to the dominance of Windows, commoditising specialised sensor packages means the "operating system" will dominate. Apple's vision with HomeKit was to apply stringent privacy and security controls to try and prevent the dumpster fire of surveillance capitalism from getting worse. The tradeoff was the effort required from device manufacturers, which leads to higher prices, which leads to reduced demand from consumers.

    I believe the Matter standard is most likely going to take over and Apple will at some point sunset HomeKit. But my guess is that's a decade or more away.
    I'm referring to abstracted in an IoT context. Virtualised was another possible term. 

    In standard computing hardware, abstraction was key to improving system stability. That was one of the fundamental strong points of OS X. In simple terms, no software could talk directly to hardware. Almost everything had to go through dynamically loaded kernel extensions/libraries etc. 

    It was structurally very vertical. The system would communicate with everything connected to it and the applications would run on the system. Each application would be specifically written for the system it would be deployed on. Then came the phone, tablet, watch etc each with its own OS and apps written vertically and specifically for each OS. 

    When you took a step back everything was basically 'siloed' and there was no way to truly break through the walls of each silo elegantly. Solutions have been cooked up to enable communication between siloed systems but the systems were not designed with that in mind. That is where IoT operating systems come in and my use of abstracted hardware term. 

    The idea being that you write apps for functionality that comes from a pool of whatever available hardware can best provide it. That functionality is pooled and offered up as needed to each device.

    Authentication, file systems, data, security, trustworthiness is all distributed as needed across any device with sufficient authorization to carry out the task. 

    Real world examples would be taking a video call on your phone at home. The actual phone hardware would probably be far inferior to your home TV, speaker and mic systems.

    Your TV could have a 4K screen with HD wide angle camera AI tracking. Your HomePod would project crystal clear sound to you and local mics would pick up your voice. You could be positionally tracked within the home by something like a watch and have other, screens, speakers and mics activate as you move around the house. 

    A more esoteric example would be your resource strapped home router coming under external attack and using AI to adapt to the attack and pull processing resources off available hardware. The NPU of a TV would do just fine.

    As crazy as it might seem, that was given as an example in 2019 at the HarmonyOS HDC September conference. 

    Of course, that kind of functionality requires systems designed from the ground up for a Virtualised/Abstracted environment. Networking alone requires complete reworking to accommodate instant connectivity, distributed authentication, improved latency, QoS, zero packet loss etc. 

    Kernels themselves need to be on hand through a kernel abstraction layer so that only the best suited kernel does the job. You might have a device that only has a few hundred KB available and a very lightweight kernel. 

    And from a developer perspective, the idea is that it should be far simpler to code an app and have it run across multiple devices without the siloed nature of current systems. 

    That last part always reminds me of the Java write once, run anywhere marketing but I suppose things have come on a bit since those days. 

    The real takeaway is that people developing HarmonyOS, Oniro OS or any of the specialised OpenHarmony OSs all conclude that the best solution for an IoT world is an OS specifically tailored to IoT. 

    I'm not a programmer so all I can do is listen to the people involved on these projects. 




  • Reply 16 of 21
    ...is Apple really after your data...?
    No. JFC do you ever stop?
    I will stop when Apple stops ...

    https://9to5mac.com/2023/01/19/class-action-privacy-lawsuit/
    edited January 19
  • Reply 17 of 21
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,213member
    gatorguy said:
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    Way to completely miss the point, which is that you can do all of these things with an iPad. Cool Google ad, though. 
  • Reply 18 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,508member
    gatorguy said:
    I don't understand this.

     "Bloomberg, Apple's next smart home device will be a smart tablet that will control smart home devices like thermostats and lights. It will also display video and handle FaceTime chats, similar to an iPad."

    But... we already have that — it's called an iPad. And the cheapest one is already $329. All that's missing here is the mounting hardware for a wall or countertop fixed position. So why not just stick magnets on the back or something? This has to be a different kind of product. And an Apple TV with just a faster processor isn't really changing ... anything. ¯\(°_o)/¯
    It sounds like Apple wishes to create their own versions of the Google Nest Hub where the screen generally stays in one place. We have one with camera mounted under the cabinets in the kitchen for live calls, streaming media/TV, and as a calendar of events and recipe center. Two more on tables/counters with no camera, one in the home office for a multitude of uses, and the other in the master bath where my wife likes to lounge in the tub listening to music and streaming videos.  They are very useful and enjoyable, which Apple fans will discover. 

    Now that said,I think that those Nest Hubs will soon be able to be easily integrated into Apple's Homekit, or whatever they'll decide to call it once Matter is more fully rolled out. Perhaps that's what's prompting Apple's renewed interest in the category of smart devices, so that Google or "other" doesn't get too much traction in Apple homes.

    EDIT: Here's an update for those not aware of the upcoming consumer-friendly changes. https://www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/smart-home/matter-has-arrived-how-a-google-nest-hub-just-controlled-an-apple-homekit-smart-plug/
    Way to completely miss the point, which is that you can do all of these things with an iPad. Cool Google ad, though. 
    So you're saying that, in your opinion, Apple working on a similar device is a bone-headed move, just a redundant "me-too" thing that will fail in the market? 
    edited January 20
  • Reply 19 of 21
    ...is Apple really after your data...?
    No. JFC do you ever stop?
    To be fair, Apple does collect data, and they might have been found to be doing even when the user has opted out, if a couple of class action lawsuits are correct.

    The difference is that Apple has so far opted to use that data itself, and not sell it to other companies, as other companies do.  So far.

    So yes, Apple is likely after your data, even if it's not quite as nefarious as some others.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 20 of 21
    I believe Apple has the greatest potential to market an ecosystem. However, even though I was thrilled when they announced support for home automation, I don't think it's been updated in a while, and Siri's meagre additions and functionality have made it the punchline of jokes. I'll be curious to see what happens in ten years, but the mere fact that I'm considering that span of time says something.
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