iPhone 15 to require certified accessories for full access to USB-C

Posted:
in iPhone edited February 2023
According to a rumor, Apple is resuming the Made For iPhone program despite moving from Lightning to USB-C on iPhone 15.

Apple's MFi program could restrict accessory access to iPhone 15
Apple's MFi program could restrict accessory access to iPhone 15


Apple requires third-party accessory makers to pay a fee to get certified access to select parts and technologies like the Lightning connector. This system is called the Made For iPhone program, and it was thought to be going away thanks to USB-C, but a repeated rumor says otherwise.

According to leaker ShrimpApplePro on Twitter, Apple will be requiring MFi certification for products connecting to the iPhone 15. This has been confirmed by the leaker's source, stating that Foxconn is in mass production of accessories like EarPods and cables with the certification.

The leaker does offer a bright side to the matter -- some third-party MFi products are cheaper than Apple's official ones.

In the replies, Shrimp states that Apple will limit data and charging speed for cables connected to iPhone without the MFi certification. It seems this will be allowed, as Apple will be cooperating with the EU mandate to move to USB-C, just providing an obstacle to users.

Yeah usb-c with MFI is happening
Foxconn already in mass production accessories like EarPods and cables pic.twitter.com/1ka9CRlY93

-- ShrimpApplePro (@VNchocoTaco)


While this might appear to be a consumer-hostile move from Apple, there are reasons the company might want a certification process. Obviously, Apple stands to make some money from charging for the certified parts and technology, but consumers will also have more confidence in buying products they know are guaranteed to work seamlessly with the iPhone.

Despite all of the praise USB-C gets for its universal connector, there are a lot of problems with it too. It is nearly impossible to tell what capabilities a cable might have just by looking at it, which could potentially damage a product if connected in an unexpected way.

This isn't the first time someone suggested Apple would continue the MFi program. It was previously shared via a Weibo post, but this is the first time a reliable leaker spoke up about it.

ShrimpApplePro has a decent history with product leaks. For example, Shrimp did correctly say that the Apple Watch Series 8 wouldn't be redesigned, and one leak about the dimensions of the iPhone 14 Pro was fairly accurate.

The iPhone 15 and iPhone 15 Pro are expected to launch in September 2023. The entire lineup is expected to have USB-C and the Dynamic Island, though the pro models will have exclusive upgrades like the A17 processor.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    I would support that and buy MFi USB-C. I had crap knockoff lightning cables that actually drained the battery and caused apps to randomly open and close on their own. Knockoffs are never worth it. 
    Elytra15[Deleted User]JanNLaaplfanboymike1watto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 2 of 16
    I'm not sure this is happening, since Mac or iPads doesn't have such a ridiculous thing. They just work fine with standard USB-C cables.
    edited February 2023 williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 16
    There are cables that look normal and yet have built in snooping ability. It would be silly to trust every cable. 
    [Deleted User]caladanianwatto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 4 of 16
    NaiyasNaiyas Posts: 107member
    Not against this at all really. Can imagine the backlash against Apple if one of their phones blows up in someone’s face while charging and the reason was due to a defective cable that “lied” about its abilities to carry current?

    I had a fairly general charger that when used with an iPhone with Touch ID it would disable the Touch ID sensor. Little did I know at the time but the charger was providing power across pins that it was not supposed to be doing for an iPhone and the Touch ID sensor was being “shorted” to save the phone.

    I’ve been MFi ever since and have had no issues at all.
    [Deleted User]williamlondonwatto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 5 of 16
    Absolute and utter BS. All C to C cables MUST support minimum of 3A at up to 20V. The Pro Max has a max charging speed of 9V @ 3A. Any cable made to spec MUST at minimum be able to max out the charging speed of an iPhone - you don’t have to look. There is no wrong way to plug in a cable that can “potentially damage” in a way MFi can solve.

    Also, no cable is going to lie about the charging speed to your device. To charge above 3A, you must include an additional special chip. If your cable does not contain such a chip, then the charger and device know the max is 3A. Anyone lying to you on the label and saving $0.001 to use a smaller gauge wire would much more likely to just not include the chip and thus your device will cap it at 3A.

    In short: this is a solution in search of a problem, to pad Apple’s pocket. If you want a tested and certified cable, the USB-IF already does that. My main gripe about Apple cords is that they’re not a guarantee of quality. Lightning cables that came with the iPhone cost $20, and last me at most a year before their soft coatings tear. Monoprice cables have a lifetime warranty but I’ve been using them for 5+ years without having to replace them. Literally paying more for an inferior product.
    edited February 2023 netroxJapheywilliamlondonAlex1N
  • Reply 6 of 16
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,354member
    ST3LL4 said:
    I'm not sure this is happening, since Mac or iPads doesn't have such a ridiculous thing. They just work fine with standard USB-C cables.
    True, existing ones are not a problem. For reasons related to Apple revenue, it may happen anyway. 
  • Reply 7 of 16
    SF90 said:
    Absolute and utter BS. All C to C cables MUST support minimum of 3A at up to 20V. The Pro Max has a max charging speed of 9V @ 3A. Any cable made to spec MUST at minimum be able to max out the charging speed of an iPhone - you don’t have to look. There is no wrong way to plug in a cable that can “potentially damage” in a way MFi can solve.

    Also, no cable is going to lie about the charging speed to your device. To charge above 3A, you must include an additional special chip. If your cable does not contain such a chip, then the charger and device know the max is 3A. Anyone lying to you on the label and saving $0.001 to use a smaller gauge wire would much more likely to just not include the chip and thus your device will cap it at 3A.

    In short: this is a solution in search of a problem, to pad Apple’s pocket. If you want a tested and certified cable, the USB-IF already does that. My main gripe about Apple cords is that they’re not a guarantee of quality. Lightning cables that came with the iPhone cost $20, and last me at most a year before their soft coatings tear. Monoprice cables have a lifetime warranty but I’ve been using them for 5+ years without having to replace them. Literally paying more for an inferior product.
    Good post,  but what if the phone is able to recognize if the cable is “MFI” and then changes how it works ?  That let’s Apple go usb-c but still have control on cabling.  Wonder if that is possible?
    Alex1N
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Don't have a problem with this at all.  USB-C isn't so much a "standard" as it is a form factor, i.e. the plug shape and pinout.  The "standard" capabilities of USB-C are myriad, and vary considerably among actual cables and connectors.  Not all cables support all of the features of USB-C, and there's almost no way to tell what features they do support without testing equipment, because no part of the USB-C standard requires manufacturers to actually label their USB-C cables with the capabilities actually supported.
    mike1williamlondonStrangeDayswatto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 9 of 16
    I would love if the different cables are marked physically and easy readable from the outside. As of today you could never know what USB-C cable you have in your hand. 
    M68000aaplfanboywatto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 10 of 16
    mike1mike1 Posts: 3,316member
    SF90 said:

    In short: this is a solution in search of a problem, to pad Apple’s pocket. If you want a tested and certified cable, the USB-IF already does that. My main gripe about Apple cords is that they’re not a guarantee of quality. Lightning cables that came with the iPhone cost $20, and last me at most a year before their soft coatings tear. Monoprice cables have a lifetime warranty but I’ve been using them for 5+ years without having to replace them. Literally paying more for an inferior product.

    Your Monoprice cables are MFi certified already. Nobody ever claimed that Apple's included cables are the most rugged cables available.


    M68000 said:

    Good post,  but what if the phone is able to recognize if the cable is “MFI” and then changes how it works ?  That let’s Apple go usb-c but still have control on cabling.  Wonder if that is possible?
    Absolutely is possible. The use of an MFi chip could unlock features or capabilities.
    williamlondonStrangeDayswatto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Maybe Apple will start doing the same thing with the Mac.
    watto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 12 of 16
    The MFI program never went away for example the reason a YubiKey 5ci works fully on an iPhone but not an iPad is because in order to do some of what it does it needs to be MFI certified. However currently MFI is not defined at all over USB-C currently thus those features do not work on iPads.
    watto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 13 of 16
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 1,072member
    Oooh there’s going to be a stink about this one! (Popcorn emoji)
    williamlondon
  • Reply 14 of 16
    SF90 said:
    Absolute and utter BS. […]

    In short: this is a solution in search of a problem, to pad Apple’s pocket. If you want a tested and certified cable, the USB-IF already does that. My main gripe about Apple cords is that they’re not a guarantee of quality. Lightning cables that came with the iPhone cost $20, and last me at most a year before their soft coatings tear. Monoprice cables have a lifetime warranty but I’ve been using them for 5+ years without having to replace them. Literally paying more for an inferior product.
    Nonsense. MFI licensing is loose pocket change in Apple’s revenue. They do it to ensure quality experience for their customers. 

    I’ve had much better experiences with Apple cables than third-party. I’ve specifically had Monoprice plug assemblies fall apart, and I’ve had multiple braided Anker’s simply cease functioning.
    watto_cobraAlex1N
  • Reply 15 of 16
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 907member
    Spare me the BS about MFi being all about maintaining a good customer experience. iPads and Macbooks do just fine with third party USB-C cables from quality manufacturers. There's no reason that iPhones would need a MFi cable other than profit. I'll be surprised if Apple goes this route because it doesn't seem as if the price to be paid in pissing off customers is worth the revenue that MFi brings in, which has to amount to little more than a rounding error in Apple's massive revenue stream.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 16 of 16
    kmareikmarei Posts: 194member
    Doesn't this violate the whole premise of the usb-c standard ?
    that it's a standard that all devices adhere to?
    The whole point behind the EU mandate is to not have to get multiple chargers and cables to support many devices
    but to have one charger and one cable that charges everything 

    I've used my HP usb-c charger to charge my iPad Pro, surface laptop 3, surface duo 2 etc with zero issues
    didn't need no mfi blesseing 
    unless apple is saying iPhones are that delicate, and that they need special assistance to work with chargers that do just fine with other brands phones, laptops etc ?
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