iPhone display orders decline 39% year-over-year

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 2023
A display shipment report from Apple's supply chain shows iPhone 14 display orders decreased sharply when compared to the iPhone 13 in the same timeframe.

iPhone display orders decline YoY
iPhone display orders decline YoY


The iPhone 14 release cycle has seen a lot of turbulence thanks to initial supply issues and waning demand into 2023. Despite that, the more expensive pro models are driving sales as customers seek to upgrade.

According to a report from Display Supply Chain Consultants, the iPhone 14 series has seen a 39% decline in display orders versus the iPhone 13 through April, year-over-year. Display orders were also down 23% from March to April for the iPhone 14 series.

The report attributes these declines to industry inventory corrections, macroeconomic headwinds, inflationary pressures, and softening demand. The demand outlook also remains weak since Apple guided the March quarter will remain similar to the December quarter.

Breaking down the supply chain report by model shows the iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max panel shipments are outperforming the iPhone 13 Pro models by 22% and 23%, respectively. This is due to the higher demand for those models thanks to the improved feature set.

One interesting pull from this data is the iPhone 13 mini versus iPhone 14 Plus. Display shipments for the newer plus model are up 59% by comparison, indicating more demand for that model versus the iPhone 13 mini.

Apple's iPhone 14 Series vs. iPhone 13 Series Procurement Over 11 Months. Source: DSCC
Apple's iPhone 14 Series vs. iPhone 13 Series Procurement Over 11 Months. Source: DSCC


Outside of the macroeconomic conditions and supply chain issues, the first half of the year tends to show weaker demand for iPhones. Sales are usually boosted by Chinese New Year in the first quarter, and a new color released in the second quarter. However, the overall trend for that first half is downward.

Also, individual component shipment information, like what is provided by this report, only provides a snippet of detail. Component orders and product demand may be correlated but not always direct indicators of each other.

For example, if a single supplier sees fewer orders from Apple for a specific component, the supplier might see that as a decrease in demand. What may actually be the case is that Apple could have filled its inventory for that component.

However, it can be useful to gauge trends using supply chain data. Other sources have reported similar trends in iPhone sales and the high demand for pro models.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,825member
    I'm on an Xs Max. Considered the 14, however, the X is such a good phone. The battery still supports max performance and the camera is not too bad. I will very likely go for the 15. Is it possible many others are holding, waiting for the next model?
    williamlondon
  • Reply 2 of 13
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,902member
    Upgrade cycles are funny things. 

    I’m still using my iPhone 11 Pro Max. 

    I typically upgrade every 4 years or so. The only time I upgraded faster than that was iPhone 4 to iPhone 6. Got tired of holding it wrong. 

    Looking forward to iPhone 15. 
    edited March 2023 radarthekat
  • Reply 3 of 13
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,387member
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.
    danoxbaconstangretrogustowilliamlondon
  • Reply 4 of 13
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 937member

    Gibberish much?

    2% HIGHER”

    ” As we approach the end of March, our latest survey of supply chain data shows that panel shipments for the iPhone 14 Series are tracking 2% higher than the iPhone 13 Series during the same time period of April – April. This continued decline in growth is the result of weakening demand, inventory corrections and macroeconomic turbulence.”

    how does 2% higher translate to a “continued decline”?
    edited March 2023 radarthekat
  • Reply 5 of 13
    davidwdavidw Posts: 2,081member
    jdw said:
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.

    Even with the "reality distortion field" in Apple DNA, Apple can not defy the laws of physics. More and/or better features, might require parts that needs more space, that iPhones with smaller displays don't have. A superior camera might require more room behind the lens and Apple is not going to try to decide on whether to make their iPhones with smaller displays thicker or the battery smaller, in order to put in the camera. Apple just assume leave it out and wait until technology can make that superior camera smaller. Or a brighter and sharper screen might require a bigger battery, that isn't possible to install on a small display iPhones, without making the iPhone thicker.  Apple is going to have to wait for a more energy efficient version of the screen or new battery technology to increase mAh, without increasing size. Then there's pricing. Apple do not want to price their models of iPhones too close together. Apple don't want a dozen of different models of iPhones with each priced a little more that the other, based on each having slightly more or better features. (other than upgrades in RAM or HD.) The smaller size iPhones with its lower cost, might be the main reasons why they are popular. Change either one and Apple could end up losing more customers (for their iPhones with smaller displays) than they gain.

    Ask the owners of the smaller iPhone if they want to have a better camera and of course they all would. But ask them if the want a better camera but at a higher price, with less battery life (or a little thicker.), then not all would want it.

    This is like wishing a Ford Focus with a 12 gallon gas tank, came with a bigger gas tank and thinking it's a travesty that Ford only put a 22 gallon gas tank on their full size pick up trucks. Sometimes, it's not a case of Ford not thinking in the best interest of their customers.
    radarthekatwilliamlondon
  • Reply 6 of 13
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,884member
    davidw said:
    jdw said:
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.

    Even with the "reality distortion field" in Apple DNA, Apple can not defy the laws of physics. More and/or better features, might require parts that needs more space, that iPhones with smaller displays don't have. A superior camera might require more room behind the lens and Apple is not going to try to decide on whether to make their iPhones with smaller displays thicker or the battery smaller, in order to put in the camera. Apple just assume leave it out and wait until technology can make that superior camera smaller. Or a brighter and sharper screen might require a bigger battery, that isn't possible to install on a small display iPhones, without making the iPhone thicker.  Apple is going to have to wait for a more energy efficient version of the screen or new battery technology to increase mAh, without increasing size. Then there's pricing. Apple do not want to price their models of iPhones too close together. Apple don't want a dozen of different models of iPhones with each priced a little more that the other, based on each having slightly more or better features. (other than upgrades in RAM or HD.) The smaller size iPhones with its lower cost, might be the main reasons why they are popular. Change either one and Apple could end up losing more customers (for their iPhones with smaller displays) than they gain.

    Ask the owners of the smaller iPhone if they want to have a better camera and of course they all would. But ask them if the want a better camera but at a higher price, with less battery life (or a little thicker.), then not all would want it.

    This is like wishing a Ford Focus with a 12 gallon gas tank, came with a bigger gas tank and thinking it's a travesty that Ford only put a 22 gallon gas tank on their full size pick up trucks. Sometimes, it's not a case of Ford not thinking in the best interest of their customers.
    The higher density battery technology is already here and could be shipping already: Silicon-carbon. 

    It allows the batteries to function at far lower voltages too. 

    The problem is a different one. Apple's smaller phones are typically its cheaper ones. That isn't where you would expect to see a new battery technology but it isn't for technical reasons, only economic. 

    edited March 2023
  • Reply 7 of 13
    iOS_Guy80iOS_Guy80 Posts: 851member
    avon b7 said:
    davidw said:
    jdw said:
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.

    Even with the "reality distortion field" in Apple DNA, Apple can not defy the laws of physics. More and/or better features, might require parts that needs more space, that iPhones with smaller displays don't have. A superior camera might require more room behind the lens and Apple is not going to try to decide on whether to make their iPhones with smaller displays thicker or the battery smaller, in order to put in the camera. Apple just assume leave it out and wait until technology can make that superior camera smaller. Or a brighter and sharper screen might require a bigger battery, that isn't possible to install on a small display iPhones, without making the iPhone thicker.  Apple is going to have to wait for a more energy efficient version of the screen or new battery technology to increase mAh, without increasing size. Then there's pricing. Apple do not want to price their models of iPhones too close together. Apple don't want a dozen of different models of iPhones with each priced a little more that the other, based on each having slightly more or better features. (other than upgrades in RAM or HD.) The smaller size iPhones with its lower cost, might be the main reasons why they are popular. Change either one and Apple could end up losing more customers (for their iPhones with smaller displays) than they gain.

    Ask the owners of the smaller iPhone if they want to have a better camera and of course they all would. But ask them if the want a better camera but at a higher price, with less battery life (or a little thicker.), then not all would want it.

    This is like wishing a Ford Focus with a 12 gallon gas tank, came with a bigger gas tank and thinking it's a travesty that Ford only put a 22 gallon gas tank on their full size pick up trucks. Sometimes, it's not a case of Ford not thinking in the best interest of their customers.
    The higher density battery technology is already here and could be shipping already: Silicon-carbon. 

    It allows the batteries to function at far lower voltages too. 

    The problem is a different one. Apple's smaller phones are typically its cheaper ones. That isn't where you would expect to see a new battery technology but it isn't for technical reasons, only economic. 

    Apple’s smaller phones are not cheap. They are quality devices that are less expensive than the larger phones.

    williamlondon
  • Reply 8 of 13
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 1,121member
    According to a report from Display Supply Chain Consultants, the iPhone 14 series has seen a 39% decline in display orders versus the iPhone 13 through April, year-over-year. Display orders were also down 23% from March to April for the iPhone 14 series.”

    It looks like somebody accidentally released this report early. Here in the U.S., it’s still mid-March.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 9 of 13
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,884member
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    avon b7 said:
    davidw said:
    jdw said:
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.

    Even with the "reality distortion field" in Apple DNA, Apple can not defy the laws of physics. More and/or better features, might require parts that needs more space, that iPhones with smaller displays don't have. A superior camera might require more room behind the lens and Apple is not going to try to decide on whether to make their iPhones with smaller displays thicker or the battery smaller, in order to put in the camera. Apple just assume leave it out and wait until technology can make that superior camera smaller. Or a brighter and sharper screen might require a bigger battery, that isn't possible to install on a small display iPhones, without making the iPhone thicker.  Apple is going to have to wait for a more energy efficient version of the screen or new battery technology to increase mAh, without increasing size. Then there's pricing. Apple do not want to price their models of iPhones too close together. Apple don't want a dozen of different models of iPhones with each priced a little more that the other, based on each having slightly more or better features. (other than upgrades in RAM or HD.) The smaller size iPhones with its lower cost, might be the main reasons why they are popular. Change either one and Apple could end up losing more customers (for their iPhones with smaller displays) than they gain.

    Ask the owners of the smaller iPhone if they want to have a better camera and of course they all would. But ask them if the want a better camera but at a higher price, with less battery life (or a little thicker.), then not all would want it.

    This is like wishing a Ford Focus with a 12 gallon gas tank, came with a bigger gas tank and thinking it's a travesty that Ford only put a 22 gallon gas tank on their full size pick up trucks. Sometimes, it's not a case of Ford not thinking in the best interest of their customers.
    The higher density battery technology is already here and could be shipping already: Silicon-carbon. 

    It allows the batteries to function at far lower voltages too. 

    The problem is a different one. Apple's smaller phones are typically its cheaper ones. That isn't where you would expect to see a new battery technology but it isn't for technical reasons, only economic. 

    Apple’s smaller phones are not cheap. They are quality devices that are less expensive than the larger phones.

    Yes, that's why I said 'its' (Apple's) cheaper ones 
  • Reply 10 of 13
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,875moderator
    Upgrade cycles are funny things. 

    I’m still using my iPhone 11 Pro Max. 

    I typically upgrade every 4 years or so. The only time I upgraded faster than that was iPhone 4 to iPhone 6. Got tired of holding it wrong. 

    Looking forward to iPhone 15. 
    Every few years there's an iPhone model that stands out, and I think the 11 Pro Max is such a model.  Last of the rounded edge form factors, the cases tend to conform to that edge and therefore rest in the hand well.  I can speak to this as I retained my 11 Pro Max when I upgraded to a 13 Pro Max, so I'm constantly switching between them as one or the other charges. The 13 Pro Max has superior cameras and it's faster, of course, but for everyday tasks the 11 Pro Max is its equal.  And my battery life is still 89% after more than 3 years.  It has me thinking to trade in the 13 Pro Max for a top of the line iPhone 15 Pro Max or Ultra (whatever they'll call it).  And then replace the battery on the 11 Pro Max and keep it going as my spare.  It's really a terrific phone.  
    edited March 2023
  • Reply 11 of 13
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,875moderator
    jdw said:
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.
    I honestly don't know one female here in the Philippines who would want less than the biggest screen they can afford, or have someone gift them.  In this SE Asian country, small screens are not in vogue among the female population.  I don't know a couple fellow American expats who carry the smaller iPhone models.  I myself love the pro maxes.  
    dewmewilliamlondon
  • Reply 12 of 13
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,387member
    jdw said:
    Funny what drives people to upgrade.  I am still on an iPhone 7.  My wife has the prior model SE, and upgraded to that from an iPhone 6.  And as much as I would like an iPhone 15 for a superior camera and more RAM (the lack of which I hate the most about the iPhone 7), most of the best feature will be reserved for the tablet sized models, which is a real travesty.  

    Some people don't want a larger sized phone, and certainly not most female iPhone lovers, and even many men here in Japan prefer a smaller phone too.  And yet, if you ask most people if they could do more with a vastly better camera or some of the fancy features that will be exclusive to the largest sized phones, they would say yes.  

    So Apple's moves are in the best interest of Apple only, and not really in the best interest of consumers.  A consumer oriented line would offer the same great feature set across a wide range of display sizes.
    I honestly don't know one female here in the Philippines who would want less than the biggest screen they can afford, or have someone gift them.  In this SE Asian country, small screens are not in vogue among the female population.  I don't know a couple fellow American expats who carry the smaller iPhone models.  I myself love the pro maxes.  
    Things are quite different here in Japan.  Then again, in my travels of Asia I have generally found that to be true.  There tends to be a lot of similar thinking and similar cultural aspects in many Asian countries, and then you come to Japan and find they have a starkly different way of doing things.  

    Despite that, the one "big" exception to Japan's "love of smallness" rule is when it comes to cars.  For the life of me, even though I have lived in Japan since 1994, I cannot figure out why so many young couples with kids in Japan break the smallness-love rule by purchasing Toyota Voxy or Noah or Alphard cars. Those cars are quite large, harder to park in Japan's small parking spaces, and really aren't necessary at all when the average family has only 1 child.  I have two children but never had the desire at all to purchase a larger passenger vehicle like that.  Then again, we also broke the trend of putting a ridiculous "Baby on Board" sticker on the back of our car too.  Our family tends to Think Different. :-)

    All said, Japan loves its larger boxy cars, but not necessarily large screen smartphones.

    Best-Selling Smartphones in Japan in Oct 2022
    RankModelsSales Share
    1Apple iPhone SE 202223%
    2Apple iPhone 1314%
    3Apple iPhone 149%
    4Apple iPhone 14 Pro7%
  • Reply 13 of 13
    thttht Posts: 5,540member

    Apple's iPhone 14 Series vs. iPhone 13 Series Procurement Over 11 Months. Source: DSCC
    Look at the months of September through January. Apple's ordered something like 10m more displays through those months, and therefore had about the same number of iPhone 14 series displays as 13 series displays in the June to March timeframe. So, this looks more like inventory and supply chain related fluctuations than demand issues, for both 13 and 14 series.
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