iPhones and Android devices get treated differently when retired

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 2023
A new report focuses on user behavior when a smartphone is retired, and illustrates the differences between iPhone owners, and Android users.

Most iPhone users trade in their device
Most iPhone users trade in their device


The latest report from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) found that, among consumers who purchased a new iPhone in 2022, 43% chose to trade it in. Another 7% of people sold their devices to a third party.

Meanwhile, 36% of consumers kept their older phones as a backup or to give to a friend or family member. Those using an Android phone had different patterns for disposing of their old models.




Most of them -- 65% -- kept their old phone as a backup or to give to a friend or family member. Even though most iPhone retailers also accept trade-ins for Android models, only 14% of Android users do so.

"Perhaps the typically lower trade-in values for Android phones makes that a less desirable transaction," CIRP writes. "Or perhaps customers switching from Android to iPhone want the security of knowing they still have a familiar Android device to fall back on or refer to, if their migration fails to bring every last contact, photo, or note to their new iOS device."

A report from March 15 gave some insight into the world of smartphone trade-ins. For example, one company, US Mobile Phones (USMP), reportedly handled over 2.5 million traded-in phones in 2022, and most were iPhones.

Businesses like USMP favor iPhones over Androids because they hold their resale value better than other smartphones. Another reason is that Apple supports old iPhone models with software updates for years.

Resellers can also profit from previously-used iPhones. In some cases, they might receive between 10% to 15% in profits by selling secondhand models.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    "A new report focuses on user behavior when a smartphone is retired, and illustrates the differences between iPhone owners, and Android users."

    Kind of astounding this is the conclusion the author came to when the article has this quote:

    "Perhaps the typically lower trade-in values for Android phones makes that a less desirable transaction"

    It's not a difference in the users it's a difference in devices. The Android market has a ton of cheap phones that have no resale value after a few years. The only thing they are really good for is recycling or holding on to incase you need a backup device. iPhone hold value so trading them in, reselling them or passing them on to a family/friend makes more sense. 

    The behavior is dictated by the devices not a difference in people. If iPhone lost value like low end Android devices you would see the exact same behavior. 


    avon b7gatorguywilliamlondonlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 9
    mike1mike1 Posts: 3,302member

    "Or perhaps customers switching from Android to iPhone want the security of knowing they still have a familiar Android device to fall back on or refer to, if their migration fails to bring every last contact, photo, or note to their new iOS device."

    That's some flawed logic. Every time I have traded in my older phone, it was done after I received the new device. With the last three phones we traded in with AT&T, I only had to return the old device within 30 (maybe 60) days. Plenty of time to make sure everything transferred over properly.

    The likely reason is the higher value of used iPhones.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 9
    I don't get the differentiation, allured to in the article that somebody 'owns' an iPhone , but an Android device merely 'used'

    Surely both devices are owned and used?

    Just saying.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,304member
    I have been in the habit of selling my 2-3 year old iPhones on eBay when I buy new models.  I always buy maximum memory since that is what people want on this secondary market as Apple only makes old models with less memory for the budget market.

    I always flabbergasted by the feeding frenzy these auctions create.  I get inundated by eBay messages until the devices are sold.  It’s a bit of work but I typically net $400-600 which helps offset the price of a new iPhone.
    radarthekatdanoxwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 9
    davidwdavidw Posts: 2,073member
    I don't get the differentiation, allured to in the article that somebody 'owns' an iPhone , but an Android device merely 'used'

    Surely both devices are owned and used?

    Just saying.

    "Android" is not a phone. "Android" is a mobile OS. One don't "own" Android" but can own an "Android" phone like a Samsung or LG. Since the only phone that runs on iOS is an iPhone, iPhone owners and iOS users can be consider the same (when referring to mobile phones.) 
    williamlondonlolliverdewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 9
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,291member
    davidw said:
    I don't get the differentiation, allured to in the article that somebody 'owns' an iPhone , but an Android device merely 'used'

    Surely both devices are owned and used?

    Just saying.

    "Android" is not a phone. "Android" is a mobile OS. One don't "own" Android" but can own an "Android" phone like a Samsung or LG. Since the only phone that runs on iOS is an iPhone, iPhone owners and iOS users can be consider the same (when referring to mobile phones.) 
    There are not "Android owners"  anymore than there are "iOS owners". Both are licensed operating systems that the end-buyer of a compatible device does not own.. I don't see any reason not to refer to Android device owners and Apple device owners. 

    At the same time it was a somewhat petty point for the OP to bring up. In general you write to appeal to your audience. All article editors have specific reasons to choose the words they use to support the purpose for their story. I think that's understood so not worth the time arguing semantics. 
    viclauyycradarthekat
  • Reply 7 of 9
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,857moderator
    "A new report focuses on user behavior when a smartphone is retired, and illustrates the differences between iPhone owners, and Android users."

    Kind of astounding this is the conclusion the author came to when the article has this quote:

    "Perhaps the typically lower trade-in values for Android phones makes that a less desirable transaction"

    It's not a difference in the users it's a difference in devices. The Android market has a ton of cheap phones that have no resale value after a few years. The only thing they are really good for is recycling or holding on to incase you need a backup device. iPhone hold value so trading them in, reselling them or passing them on to a family/friend makes more sense. 

    The behavior is dictated by the devices not a difference in people. If iPhone lost value like low end Android devices you would see the exact same behavior. 


    The difference in the people is that some people choose to own Androids and others choose to own iPhones.  They aren’t randomly assigned a phone brand when they show up at the store to acquire one.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 9
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,857moderator
    mike1 said:

    "Or perhaps customers switching from Android to iPhone want the security of knowing they still have a familiar Android device to fall back on or refer to, if their migration fails to bring every last contact, photo, or note to their new iOS device."

    That's some flawed logic. Every time I have traded in my older phone, it was done after I received the new device. With the last three phones we traded in with AT&T, I only had to return the old device within 30 (maybe 60) days. Plenty of time to make sure everything transferred over properly.

    The likely reason is the higher value of used iPhones.
    It’s a big world, and most of it exists outside the Inited States.  Here in The Philippines there’s no such period within which you can hold your old phone with a guaranteed trade-in price.  You trade it or you keep it or sell it private sale.    
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 9
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,987member
    mike1 said:

    "Or perhaps customers switching from Android to iPhone want the security of knowing they still have a familiar Android device to fall back on or refer to, if their migration fails to bring every last contact, photo, or note to their new iOS device."

    That's some flawed logic. Every time I have traded in my older phone, it was done after I received the new device. With the last three phones we traded in with AT&T, I only had to return the old device within 30 (maybe 60) days. Plenty of time to make sure everything transferred over properly.

    The likely reason is the higher value of used iPhones.
    It’s a big world, and most of it exists outside the Inited States.  Here in The Philippines there’s no such period within which you can hold your old phone with a guaranteed trade-in price.  You trade it or you keep it or sell it private sale.    
    How fast in the Philippines would an 11 Pro iPhone sell for with maximum memory, and all bells and whistles?
Sign In or Register to comment.