Nothing launches Ear (2) with Hi-Res Audio certification

Posted:
in General Discussion
Nothing, a consumer tech company, has launched its Ear (2) wireless earbuds with hi-res audio and custom sound profiles.

Nothing launches new earbuds
Nothing launches new earbuds


Nothing makes unique products in transparent casings, such as the Phone (1). It has now updated its earbud lineup with the Ear (2).

With its LHDC 5.0 technology and Hi-Res Audio certification, Ear (2) offers a great audio experience. Via the Nothing X app, users may also design their own Personal Sound Profile after passing a hearing test.




Ear (2) will modify the equalizer settings in real-time to get the best possible sound quality. A new dual-chamber design improves the overall sound quality with smoother airflow, and the earbuds' 11.6mm custom driver produces deep bass and clear highs.

Ear (2) also has Personalized Active Noise Cancellation that adjusts to a user's ear canal's shape, improved wind-proof and crowd-proof Clear Speech Technology, and Dual Connectivity for simple device switching.

The earbuds are certified for High-Res Audio to provide an immersive sound experience. The LHDC 5.0 codec technology transmits frequencies up to 24 bit/192 kHz at rates up to 1 Mbps, ensuring more high-quality audio.

Ear (2) can play music for up to 36 hours following a complete charge in the charging case (with ANC turned off). They can run for up to 8 hours on a 10-minute charge when using fast charge.




Ear (2) can reverse charge compatible devices like the Nothing Phone and supports wireless charging up to 2.5W. And they can survive many situations outdoors with an IP54 water-resistance rating for the earbuds and an IP55 charging case.

Pricing & Availability

Ear (2) will cost $149 and is available on Nothing's website starting March 22. On March 23, Ear (2) will be available to purchase in-person at the Nothing Store Soho in London and select Kith stores worldwide, including the US, France, and Japan.

And starting March 28, Ear (2) will go on general sale across all of Nothing's global partners, both online and offline, including StockX in the US.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,982member
    For f-sake would somebody please leverage all this wonderful in-ear audio technology into hearing aids that don’t cost thousands and don’t sound like a tin can on a string? I have yet to meet a hearing aid user who thinks theirs are worth a damn. Plus, with earbuds in you don’t look like a geezer!
    badmonkcg27watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 3
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,316member
    For f-sake would somebody please leverage all this wonderful in-ear audio technology into hearing aids that don’t cost thousands and don’t sound like a tin can on a string? I have yet to meet a hearing aid user who thinks theirs are worth a damn. Plus, with earbuds in you don’t look like a geezer!
    and I am surprised Apple hasn’t done it yet…if ever a market was poised for disruption…it is this.
    cg27watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 3
    cg27cg27 Posts: 214member
    badmonk said:
    For f-sake would somebody please leverage all this wonderful in-ear audio technology into hearing aids that don’t cost thousands and don’t sound like a tin can on a string? I have yet to meet a hearing aid user who thinks theirs are worth a damn. Plus, with earbuds in you don’t look like a geezer!
    and I am surprised Apple hasn’t done it yet…if ever a market was poised for disruption…it is this.
    Indeed I’ve been saying this for years, a huge and growing opportunity with the baby boom generation retiring in droves.  Hopefully with the new US law allowing for over the counter aids this will get Apple, Sony, Samsung and others introducing aids just like eyeglass frames are stylish with no stigma.

    Apple has slowly introduced aid features but the ultimate rollout would be to have an AppleWatch control the hearing aspects as a default mode via the Digital Crown so as to not have to disrupt eye contact in a conversation.

    Biggest issues I see is that Apple might not want to skew to an older customer base, while possibly being accused of causing some hearing loss over the years.  Not saying that’s a valid claim, as it’s ultimately up to the user to set volume when jamming to music.

    Then again, AppleWatch is becoming a health aid so better hearing aid functionality shouldn’t be a stigma for Apple to pursue.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.