iOS 17 rumored to get big updates to Wallet & Find My

Posted:
in iOS
After months of rumors suggesting that iOS 17 would be a minor update, new reports have emerged on Friday saying that Apple is planning big changes to the built-in Wallet and Find My apps.

iOS 17 may bring changes to Wallet
iOS 17 may bring changes to Wallet


Some rumors have said the new iOS release would focus more on maintenance and stability, although some aspects of the system could see significant changes. For example, a report earlier in April said that the Control Center could see an extensive redesign.

Mark Gurman, who has an excellent track record for Apple leaks and rumors, said recently that the Wallet and Find My apps could get updated, speaking to MacRumors on a podcast. Apple may improve Find My as part of a more significant push for location-related features.

Gurman also mentioned the Wallet getting updates, such as tweaks to the user interface. Additionally, while Apple is likely working on introducing sideloading to iOS 17 for users to install apps outside of the App Store, Gurman said that the company might limit it to Europe.

He finished by promising to share more iOS 17 information in the future.

Another rumor -- albeit sketchy -- from October claimed that Apple is working on a new version of Messages. Majin Bu said the app might get a new "home area" along with chat rooms, video clips, and AR chat features.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,936member
    It’s becoming increasingly clear that these rumor scores and reputation descriptions of track records of leak and rumor makers is entirely an act of whimsy. 

    Here, this article says “months of rumors suggesting that iOS 17would be a minor update,” and that “Some rumors have said the new iOS release would focus more on maintenance and stability,” but we have fanfare for Mark Gurman, “who has an excellent track record for Apple leaks and rumors.” Then the article here describes Gurman’s predictions of BIG CHANGES to Apple Wallet and Find My. Here, Gurman also tells us that changes on the side-loading front will probably be limited to Europe. 

    The odd part, of course, is that it was less than a week ago when the very same Mark Gurman was quoted (https://appleinsider.com/articles/23/04/16/apple-will-lay-sideloading-groundwork-in-ios-17) on this very same site, proclaiming the afore-mentioned ho-hum nature of updates to iOS 17 coming to WWDC, as well as a proclamation that the one thing different coming from Apple at the conference would be laying the groundwork for capitulation on the side-loading issue. 

    So once again I have to wonder what these scores and reputation claims are based on, when the prognosticators constantly modify or even contradict their own predictions. Less than a week and this one has flipped, yet he’s congratulated for his “excellent track record.” That’s amazing, really. 
    trackerozlolliverdewmeuraharamuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 12
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,215member
    AppleZulu said:
    It’s becoming increasingly clear that these rumor scores and reputation descriptions of track records of leak and rumor makers is entirely an act of whimsy. 

    Um … are you sure you understand what a “rumor” is? Literally it is an unsubstantiated report with no way to confirm it. Mark like all the other reporters is speculating based on unreliable reports from possibly-accurate, possibly-not sources, alongside his own experience with what Apple tends to do.

    Sites like AppleInsider would be glad to drop rumor reporting entirely, precisely because it is unreliable and prone to flip-flops, but readers on this and the other Apple sites demand that rumors be covered. The best a site can do is try to put a “warning label” on how likely they think something is.

    If you’re just now waking up to the fact that even frequently-correct-in-the-end rumor mongers like Gurman and Ming-Chi Kuo often flip=flop because new sources contradict the old ones, thus forcing them to rewrite their predictions sometimes as much as a full 180 degrees, you really haven’t been paying attention to the rumor “market.” This happens all the time, in predictable yearly cycles.

    Apple tries to keep a tight lid on this stuff, creating a vacuum for information, and that leads to dodgy sourcing. Most rumors are just educated guesses about where Apple will go next, not soon-to-be-fired factory workers blabbing about Apple’s actual process and plans. I’m sorry if you did not know that, but again — if readers didn’t demand this coverage, and prove it over and over again by driving hits and clicks here and YouTube and other sites and pretty much everywhere, most of these sites would largely avoid reporting on unverified stuff like this.
    edited April 2023 williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 12
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,936member
    chasm said:
    AppleZulu said:
    It’s becoming increasingly clear that these rumor scores and reputation descriptions of track records of leak and rumor makers is entirely an act of whimsy. 

    Um … are you sure you understand what a “rumor” is? Literally it is an unsubstantiated report with no way to confirm it. Mark like all the other reporters is <em>speculating</em> based on unreliable reports from possibly-accurate, possibly-not sources.’’

    Sites like AppleInsider would be glad to drop rumor reporting entirely precisely because it is unreliable and prone to flip-flops, but readers on this and the other Apple sites demand that rumors be covered. The best a site can do is try to put a “warning label” on how likely they think something is.

    If you’re just now waking up to the fact that even often-correct-in-the-end rumor mongers like Gurman and Ming-Chi Kuo often flip=flop because new sources contradict the old ones, thus forcing them to rewrite their predictions sometimes as much as a full 180 degrees, you really haven’t been paying attention to the rumor “market.”

    Apple tries to keep a tight lid on this stuff, creating a vacuum for information, and that leads to dodgy sourcing. Most rumors are just educated guesses about where Apple will go next, not soon-to-be-fired factory workers blabbing about Apple’s actual process and plans. I’m sorry if you did not know that, but again — if readers didn’t demand this coverage, and prove it over and over again by driving hits and clicks here and YouTube and other sites and pretty much everywhere, most of these sites would largely avoid reporting on unverified stuff like this.
    I get what a rumor site is, but thanks for the vaguely condescending primer. 

    What I don’t get is the practice of lauding some of these prognosticators for having fantastic track records when there’s clearly no quantitative criteria for making the claim. It’s especially ridiculous lauding the track record of someone who is literally contradicting something they said just six days ago. It’s even more hilarious that the contradiction comes in an article that notes the change from prior predictions using language that implies it’s unnamed others who are being corrected, rather than the guy with the great track record contradicting himself. 

    In politics, there’s spin, like describing the flop-sweaty Richard Nixon in the famous televised debate with Kennedy as ‘more genuine, a real candidate who sweats the important stuff.’ Then there’s just lying, like claiming Nixon wasn’t sweaty, and that it was Kennedy who looked like a drippy wet mess. 

    Praising Gurman’s track record in an article that neglects to mention that it’s his own very recent self that he’s contradicting is more like the second thing than the first. 
    lolliverwilliamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 12
    lolliverlolliver Posts: 493member
    chasm said:
    AppleZulu said:
    It’s becoming increasingly clear that these rumor scores and reputation descriptions of track records of leak and rumor makers is entirely an act of whimsy. 

    Um … are you sure you understand what a “rumor” is? Literally it is an unsubstantiated report with no way to confirm it. Mark like all the other reporters is speculating based on unreliable reports from possibly-accurate, possibly-not sources, alongside his own experience with what Apple tends to do.

    Sites like AppleInsider would be glad to drop rumor reporting entirely, precisely because it is unreliable and prone to flip-flops, but readers on this and the other Apple sites demand that rumors be covered. The best a site can do is try to put a “warning label” on how likely they think something is.

    If you’re just now waking up to the fact that even frequently-correct-in-the-end rumor mongers like Gurman and Ming-Chi Kuo often flip=flop because new sources contradict the old ones, thus forcing them to rewrite their predictions sometimes as much as a full 180 degrees, you really haven’t been paying attention to the rumor “market.” This happens all the time, in predictable yearly cycles.

    Apple tries to keep a tight lid on this stuff, creating a vacuum for information, and that leads to dodgy sourcing. Most rumors are just educated guesses about where Apple will go next, not soon-to-be-fired factory workers blabbing about Apple’s actual process and plans. I’m sorry if you did not know that, but again — if readers didn’t demand this coverage, and prove it over and over again by driving hits and clicks here and YouTube and other sites and pretty much everywhere, most of these sites would largely avoid reporting on unverified stuff like this.
    Wow, so condescending and missing the point completely. AppleZulu wasn’t complaining about the rumours themselves or the fact they weren’t accurate. They were highlighting issues with the rumour rating system and the fact the article didn’t mention Gurman was changing his own prediction. Many of the things you mentioned about how the rumour mill works are the very issues AppleZulu was pointing out were not being addressed well in the article. 
    edited April 2023 williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 12
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,766member
    Wallet tabs, please. Or some other way to organize everything more logically than a big pile. 
    gregoriusmwilliamlondonramanpfafflollivergrandact73watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 12
    kelliekellie Posts: 42member
    Forget about the minutia of marginal improvements in application or iOS functionality. What Apple needs to do, be it through AI or expert systems, is two fold: 1. Instead of people developing expert level knowledge about what all the different menu functions offer, there should be a tool that reviews all of your current menu settings and assesses them for risks or inconsistencies or security exposures or usability and presents findings, suggested changes or confirmation of the user’s desires. 2. Especially for new users of iPhone products, provide an interview process and as a result of the interview the tool goes through and makes the appropriate menu selections. The menu structures have become so broad and so deep and complex that it is overwhelming for most users. I realize this is a difficult undertaking but there would certainly be basic ways of starting this with a focus on important features or security settings. The same could be done for the Mac. Plus it would be a very powerful tool that could attract Android converts to the iPhone. The annual updates on iPhone hardware improvements is a bit of a circus. Every year it’s the same thing. Marginally Faster, better, more capable hardware. But very little about usability or simplicity. Perhaps this is a skunkworks project, but I think Apple is too focused on the next big hardware “thing” , which I know drives revenue. But simplicity, usability and removing the technology burden from the average user could drive revenue as well.
    gregoriusmwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 12
    Japhey said:
    Wallet tabs, please. Or some other way to organize everything more logically than a big pile. 
    This. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 12
    XedXed Posts: 2,460member
    Japhey said:
    Wallet tabs, please. Or some other way to organize everything more logically than a big pile. 
    I could definitely go for better organization.

    I'd also like to keep more than one bank account and routing number saved on my Apple Cash Card account. I like to use my Apple Wallet to pull funds from other accounts via my debit card and then transfer to another account as needed. This way, if one those online-accessible financial instituions happens to get violated a would be attacker can't then see what other financial institutions I have linked. I feel my credentials are safer on the Secure Element of iPhone.

    Additionally, and I doubt this will happen this year, I'd like for the card selection to be smarter. For example, if I'm at Costco I'd like for the card that defaults as first to be the Citi Bank Costco card, but if I'm at an Apple Store I'd like that to be the Apple Card.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 12
    XedXed Posts: 2,460member
    kellie said:
    Forget about the minutia of marginal improvements in application or iOS functionality. What Apple needs to do, be it through AI or expert systems, is two fold: 1. Instead of people developing expert level knowledge about what all the different menu functions offer, there should be a tool that reviews all of your current menu settings and assesses them for risks or inconsistencies or security exposures or usability and presents findings, suggested changes or confirmation of the user’s desires. 2. Especially for new users of iPhone products, provide an interview process and as a result of the interview the tool goes through and makes the appropriate menu selections. The menu structures have become so broad and so deep and complex that it is overwhelming for most users. I realize this is a difficult undertaking but there would certainly be basic ways of starting this with a focus on important features or security settings. The same could be done for the Mac. Plus it would be a very powerful tool that could attract Android converts to the iPhone. The annual updates on iPhone hardware improvements is a bit of a circus. Every year it’s the same thing. Marginally Faster, better, more capable hardware. But very little about usability or simplicity. Perhaps this is a skunkworks project, but I think Apple is too focused on the next big hardware “thing” , which I know drives revenue. But simplicity, usability and removing the technology burden from the average user could drive revenue as well.
    🤮
    williamlondon
  • Reply 10 of 12
    I want 2 things for Wallet:

    1. Move away from the idiotic UI where passes are shown in a stacked fashion. It’s very hard to navigate and we don’t want to simulate a real world annoyance (finding the right pass in a stack) on our phones. Just show the passes in a grid!

    2. The ability to label a pass and/or customize the visual. My account numbers are not equal to the pass numbers that Wallet assigns to them. Since I have multiple passes from the same bank I can’t visually separate one from the other. Fix it, Apple, fix it!
    designrlollivergrandact73
  • Reply 11 of 12
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,936member
    kellie said:
    Forget about the minutia of marginal improvements in application or iOS functionality. What Apple needs to do, be it through AI or expert systems, is two fold: 1. Instead of people developing expert level knowledge about what all the different menu functions offer, there should be a tool that reviews all of your current menu settings and assesses them for risks or inconsistencies or security exposures or usability and presents findings, suggested changes or confirmation of the user’s desires. 2. Especially for new users of iPhone products, provide an interview process and as a result of the interview the tool goes through and makes the appropriate menu selections. The menu structures have become so broad and so deep and complex that it is overwhelming for most users. I realize this is a difficult undertaking but there would certainly be basic ways of starting this with a focus on important features or security settings. The same could be done for the Mac. Plus it would be a very powerful tool that could attract Android converts to the iPhone. The annual updates on iPhone hardware improvements is a bit of a circus. Every year it’s the same thing. Marginally Faster, better, more capable hardware. But very little about usability or simplicity. Perhaps this is a skunkworks project, but I think Apple is too focused on the next big hardware “thing” , which I know drives revenue. But simplicity, usability and removing the technology burden from the average user could drive revenue as well.
    The iPhone setup process already does this. Also, iOS is the first operating system to enforce a consistent user interface across all apps, including third party apps, so that they are immediately intuitive. 

    Prior to iOS, the purchase of a new application usually included a thick user manual. 
    williamlondonlolliverwatto_cobra
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