Apple Park faces WGA strike on first day of WWDC

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in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
The Writer's Guild of America will be making its presence felt by Apple, with it continuing its strike action at Apple Park on Monday, the same day as Apple's WWDC keynote.

Apple Park
Apple Park

Monday is a big day for Apple, with it presenting to developers around the world its next wave of operating systems and technological advancements. However, not all who are paying a visit to Apple are doing so with pleasant intentions.

In a continuation of its month-long strike action, the WGA will be heading to Apple Park to protest the iPhone maker. Deadline reports the WGA is holding an "Apple Day of Action" on June 5, targeting Cupertino as well as Apple Stores in five other cities across the United States.

Rather than an actual picket at the storefronts, the WGA and its allies will be handing out leaflets at the locations.

The strike is a result of the writer's union and the Alliance for Motion Pictures and Television Producers failing to negotiate a new contract between writers and studios. The WGA seeks fairer pay for writers, as well as protections to make writing a sustainable profession.

The WGA's justification for the action is because Apple TV+ is a growing streaming service that relies heavily on teams of writers for its programming. A picket has already affected the production of the workplace comedy "Loot," after strikers turned up at a mansion used for filming the show in early May, with "Severance" also affected by strike action.

Given that Apple's WWDC presentations are pre-recorded affairs, it seems unlikely that the WGA's presence will be felt by anyone watching the stream, unless Apple reintroduces live elements. It is likely that a number of guests who will be attending on-site events will be aware of the strike activity at Apple Park, but probably won't make much of an impact on Apple's overall plans for the day.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,993member
    BiC said:
    Security should confiscate all of their iPhones -  and Manhandle them to the ground.  Grade one project - write something on a sign.  Private security, everything goes.  We'll see if they ever come back.  We build for them to do this nonsense.  Lock them up.
    Hey somebody, your kid is posting on your account. 
    watto_cobraapplebynaturefreeassociate2Anilu_777muthuk_vanalingam9secondkox2jroyJaiOh81beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 2 of 8
    XedXed Posts: 2,708member
    BiC said:
    Security should confiscate all of their iPhones -  and Manhandle them to the ground.  Grade one project - write something on a sign.  Private security, everything goes.  We'll see if they ever come back.  We build for them to do this nonsense.  Lock them up.
    Isn't it time for your bus so you can go cheat on your wife again?
    watto_cobraapplebynatureAnilu_777BiCjroyJaiOh81
  • Reply 3 of 8
    BiC said:
    Security should confiscate all of their iPhones -  and Manhandle them to the ground.  Grade one project - write something on a sign.  Private security, everything goes.  We'll see if they ever come back.  We build for them to do this nonsense.  Lock them up.
    Don't forget to wear your brown shirt and your tiki torch when assaulting protesters.
    watto_cobraapplebynatureAnilu_777jroyJaiOh81foregoneconclusion
  • Reply 4 of 8
    Can one company agree to their terms or negotiate with them one on one rather than waiting for the whole industry to negotiate an agreement? If so, Apple should give them favorable terms and get them to end the strike against only Apple. Then Apple would be the only production company actually producing scripted fiction in the entire industry and it could work out in Apple's favor. We know they have the near-limitless pocketbook to do so. I honestly don't know if this is even feasible or if I'm being naive here, but to me it sounds like that could be a good path for Apple.
    jroy
  • Reply 5 of 8
    XedXed Posts: 2,708member
    Can one company agree to their terms or negotiate with them one on one rather than waiting for the whole industry to negotiate an agreement? If so, Apple should give them favorable terms and get them to end the strike against only Apple. Then Apple would be the only production company actually producing scripted fiction in the entire industry and it could work out in Apple's favor. We know they have the near-limitless pocketbook to do so. I honestly don't know if this is even feasible or if I'm being naive here, but to me it sounds like that could be a good path for Apple.
    It's not against a specific company, but companies that are part of the AMPTP ( Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers). Apple is is apart of that alliance and allowed the AMPTP to negotiate terms for writers of the WGA (Writers Guid of America)—which is made of the WGAW (Writers Guild of America, West ) and the WGAE (Writers Guild of America, East).

    They failed to come to an agreement by the deadline, hence the strike. According to the Guild, "writers cannot do any writing, revising, pitching, or discussing future projects with companies that are members of the AMPTP," which would come with penalties, including banishment from the Guild which would affect their income down the road. Additionally, any non-members who write for AMPTP members could find they will not be allowed to join the Guild.
    rezwitsAnilu_777muthuk_vanalingamJaiOh81applebynature
  • Reply 6 of 8
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,915member
    I get why people strike. 

    Sometimes it’s fully legit and can help negotiate fair play. Other times it’s just bully tactics. 

    I have no idea what this is about. But I do know this: they know it’s Apple’s big day so they want to hijack the publicity. 

    No class. Apple has worked hard for this event. Don’t interrupt like children. 

    If these folks cross over Apple’s property lines with this, they should be arrested. 
    edited June 2023
  • Reply 7 of 8
    inklinginkling Posts: 773member
    Given that Apple's WWDC presentations are pre-recorded affairs...
    That's one reason I've quite watching these presentations. What I suspect Apple likes about these presentations—that they can be carefully controlled and stay "on message"—is precisely why I find them a bore. 

    The other reason is the absence of Steve Jobs. No one at today's Apple has his showmanship.


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