Younger Apple customers may be the key to Apple Vision Pro's success

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2023
Apple has established a reputation for introducing innovative products, albeit at a premium price point, and the potentially higher cost of the Apple Vision Pro may not necessarily impede its success.

Apple Vision Pro
Apple Vision Pro

On Monday, the company finally unveiled the highly anticipated mixed-reality headset. Due to its initial price of $3,499, the launch trajectory of this product may deviate from Apple's typically more affordable offerings.

But the latest report from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) points out that Apple products consistently maintain a premium price point and still manage to be highly desirable and widely adopted. At this stage, it's impossible to predict if the Vision Pro will become the next essential device, but Apple isn't at its peak yet.

The seamless integration of software, services, and hardware within the Apple ecosystem contributes to the company's competitive edge. The report examines the iPhone, iPad, and Mac and the statistics of their ownership.

For instance, over 40% of Apple device users who are under 45 years old possess all three products, indicating their strong commitment to the Apple ecosystem. Conversely, among users aged 55 years or older, slightly less than one-quarter own all three products, suggesting a comparatively lower level of adoption within this age group.

It might be expected that older, potentially more affluent customers would have a higher prevalence of complete ecosystem ownership due to the premium prices of Apple products. However, this assumption does not hold.

Number of Apple products owned by age of owner as of March 2023
Number of Apple products owned by age of owner as of March 2023

Older groups, typically less familiar with technology, are less inclined to own multiple Apple devices. On the other hand, younger people who own Apple products tend to own multiple devices and actively engage with the Apple ecosystem.

These younger customers have many years of technology purchases ahead of them. Like their parents, they will continue to acquire and use machines that weren't yet in existence during their youth, but they will already be established as Apple customers when those devices are introduced.

As Apple continues to enhance and refine the Vision Pro, the headset's price will likely decrease over time. This price reduction may make the product more appealing to younger users who may not possess the same financial resources as their older counterparts.

Consequently, they may be more inclined to purchase the headset and drive its adoption. Even if the Vision Pro doesn't supplant the iPhone as a primary computing device, it probably won't fail as a product.

Read on AppleInsider
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    I love the product vision - but my concern is that it's just too expensive especially for first gen product. You know that there will be annual updates and in the first few years enough advances that will make this obsolete very quickly. The product execution, however, sure puts Meta's VR headset to shame. :) Can see this more as an enterprise tool in the future - especially as a tool to control remotely automation, robotics for enterprise and government/military segments. I personally don't see myself sitting around all day at work wearing this. I don't even wear head phones. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 21
    rynoyesrynoyes Posts: 18member
    Young people didn’t see any cool games and won’t spend 3,500 for the headset, so it won’t be successful then
    grandact73williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 21
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,574member
    I agree with the article. While the price for this is high, it’s not that simple. High end gaming headsets require a special high end computer to go with it, bringing the total cost equal to this, or to exceed it. Younger people are buying those. But these are also much simp,er headsets. They in no way equal what thus does. Even what they do that this does isn’t done as well.

    but there are headsets that are being made, and sold to business. Many of those exceed $3,000 and even $4,000. They still don’t equal this. Microsoft has a contract with the military here for $1.5 billion, for a militarized HoloLens, but that hasn’t been successful yet, after several years. Still not as good.

    Apple doesn’t expect to sell millions of this first gen. device. I’ve heard numbers bandied about from 100,000 to almost a million, in the first year. No doubt a second gen. will be less expensive.
    lotoneswatto_cobraStrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 4 of 21
    hammeroftruthhammeroftruth Posts: 1,326member
    I believe that the younger generation will buy into the concept, but not the price. Even though they may have the money, they’re not buying up other headsets because most of the others dont have a use beyond gaming, except hololense and they’re more expensive and do a lot less. 

    What you are seeing is the birth of a new way of computing. As long as Apple puts the effort and the resources into it, AND makes a device 
    “For the rest of us.”, which means a price that can be swallowed during this era of financial insecurity. If not, this thing is another cube. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 21
    williamhwilliamh Posts: 1,036member
    I don't think the problem with at least some of the older groups is lack of familiarity with technology.  It's just that older folks are less enamored with shiny objects, less likely to buy things they can't afford.

    I'm not in line to buy. I'm in one of the "older" groups and I've got plenty of Apple stuff - MacBook Air S1, HomePods, apple tv, iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, probably more.  $3,500 is just too steep.  Maybe I'll change my mind.

    There will be plenty of killer applications for this device and the price will come down.  Can't you imagine how the online dating apps are going to use this tech?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 21
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,770member
    I’ve been saying all along that it would be the younger generations that determine whether these succeed or not. A lot of the backlash I’m hearing over the Vision is coming from Boomers who, for the first time since the 60s, will have little influence in which direction an aspect of modern culture will ultimately take. 

    These headsets models aren’t meant for old people with their old rules and their old way of doing things. That’s a big reason why so many people are complaining that they don’t know what they’re for. And they are correct. These aren’t meant to solve problems and execute tasks the old way. This is the future. And these headsets are going to solve the problems, et al, in new ways that we can’t even imagine yet. And while this may cause a little anxiety with those members of the population that are used to calling all the shots…to those of us that will be around long enough to witness the evolution this tech will bring, these are exciting times. 
    edited June 2023 csimmonswatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 21
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,770member
    JP234 said:
    And where do these younger GenZ customers get the money to buy a $3,500 game toy? Parent money? Profits from their crypto and meme "investments?"

    Just asking…
    Who cares? It’s not your problem. Don’t worry about it. 
    edited June 2023 fred1melgrosswatto_cobraStrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 8 of 21
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,096member
    JP234 said:
    And where do these younger GenZ customers get the money to buy a $3,500 game toy? Parent money? Profits from their crypto and meme "investments?"

    Just asking…
    2 years ago someone pointed out: "Of course people will spend their $600 pandemic stipend on an Xbox. If your're financially fucked, $600 won't change that in the least...but at least you'll be financially fucked...and have an Xbox."

    The easy answer to your question is: they will put it on a credit card. Hey, Apple/GS will provide that too. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 21
    thrangthrang Posts: 1,015member
    Shot in the dark here, but I am guessing by the time it launches, the price will be less than 3,499... not enough to make a huge difference in the context of affordability, but will be positive PR along with the third party demos that will be part of Launch Part II....

    Conversely, the open-ended "starting at" is concerning...

    if these optical elements from Zeiss are another 300-600 bucks, even fewer will adopt version 1. Would be fascinating to know their sales estimate for Year One...

    Nonetheless, they needed to do this to get the developer community interested in the platform, as well business and consumers to begin to see the possibilities....
    edited June 2023 watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 21
    lotoneslotones Posts: 65member
    I guess I'm in the minority, but I think $3500 for the Vision Pro is cheap, considering all it does. Consider the cost of a high-end large screen 4K OLED - easily $2000 - $3500 or more. A quality surround sound system - > $1000 for the speakers alone, plus another $1000 for a *cheap* surround receiver! An M2 Mac with a 4K monitor, keyboard, trackpad... I don't even have to tell you. It even potentially replaces your Apple TV 4K. Put all that in a bag and you've long past the $3500 for the Vision Pro, and you can take the Vision Pro anywhere. Good luck moving all that other stuff around.

    That the battery pack is detachable is also a plus, enabling future capacity upgrades without buying a whole new headset. But the major thing I'm wary of is the "starting at $3499" part. I assume that means if you want the Vision Pro to run as smoothly as the demo you're going to have to pay Apple prices to upgrade the RAM, and probably the SSD storage also. And there may be an option to upgrade to the M2 Pro. So it may be a major investment to get the ideal Vision Pro setup, but I think it will still be a bargain compared to all the gear it replaces.

    I'm super impressed with the potential of the Vision Pro, especially for the price.
    sflagellollivertmayradarthekatapple4thewinwatto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 11 of 21
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 2,373member
    JP234 said:
    And where do these younger GenZ customers get the money to buy a $3,500 game toy? Parent money? Profits from their crypto and meme "investments?"

    Just asking…
    The later, I mean given they are being cut out of property market even with those investments. They can have a massive home inside their shipping container*. 

    *apologies to Neil Stephenson. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 21
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,824member
    I'm 67 and use 6 categories of Apple products every day. VisionPro would be brilliant for older generations and I'd buy it at launch (likely 18 months or more in my location). However, this device must find relevance with older customers as population demographics move to a much less heavily weighted base (age group) to more of an inverted pyramid. What is most important for my generation and above though is activity. We must remain active - this is one of the prime drivers of better health. If VisionPro can be incorporated into some form of versatile movement regime then it would provide very good value at any price. I am a road cyclist and can ride with friends all over the world on immersive, stationary bikes that provide sensory feedback. I can only imagine what it would be like to wear a VisionPro in such circumstances and for the sceptical, an Australian cyclist won at least one stage in each of two of the world's premier cycling races, the Vuelta a Espãna in Spain and this year's Giro de'italia in Italy after having been picked up by a team based entirely on his performance in what is known as the Zwift Academy (https://www.alpecin-deceuninck.com/news/zwift-academy), purely stationary racing (and some of the most demanding I have attempted). 

    There is so much more to this story. Apple is onto a winner with VisionPro.
    radarthekatmattinozlotoneswatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 21
    humbug1873humbug1873 Posts: 142member
    I don't get these complaints about the price. Look what you get: A high performance computer (M2 Chip), with high performance graphics processing (M2 Chip again), plus a very decent Audio headset and last but not least very decent AR headset for the low low price of $3500

    I do own a recent VR headset right now, that's connected to a bog standard PC with high end graphics and did my math ... that rig cost me way more than $4000 and is far worse than the Apple Vision Pro, it also includes a cable that grounds me to a huge PC box sitting on the ground (no moving around any time soon) I have to deal with Windows OS, it's extremely fiddely to set up and drives me nuts to set up bc the Augmented reality requires me to clean out the living room or suffer the consequences.

    Yes there are things from Meta that are similar in functionality (as in you can run programs on device etc), but in my view that does not compare kindly when you are looking at the things you could do with my setup mentioned above or the Apple Vision Pro and you don't have to gift your personal data to Meta and/or suffer the consequences of Microsoft Windows as an additional bones.

    Look what it really can to and look how easy it is to use and you are with me. $3500 is a low low price for what it offers. You can enjoy paying a lower price for competing (not competitive) offerings for a short time and will end up suffering for the long time on what that cheap setup brings. (As in my case I seldom use that expensive rig, because of all the hassle it requires to start with).
    iqatedomelgrosslotoneswatto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 14 of 21
    lotones said:
    I guess I'm in the minority, but I think $3500 for the Vision Pro is cheap, considering all it does. Consider the cost of a high-end large screen 4K OLED - easily $2000 - $3500 or more. A quality surround sound system - > $1000 for the speakers alone, plus another $1000 for a *cheap* surround receiver! An M2 Mac with a 4K monitor, keyboard, trackpad... I don't even have to tell you. It even potentially replaces your Apple TV 4K. Put all that in a bag and you've long past the $3500 for the Vision Pro, and you can take the Vision Pro anywhere. Good luck moving all that other stuff around.

    That the battery pack is detachable is also a plus, enabling future capacity upgrades without buying a whole new headset. But the major thing I'm wary of is the "starting at $3499" part. I assume that means if you want the Vision Pro to run as smoothly as the demo you're going to have to pay Apple prices to upgrade the RAM, and probably the SSD storage also. And there may be an option to upgrade to the M2 Pro. So it may be a major investment to get the ideal Vision Pro setup, but I think it will still be a bargain compared to all the gear it replaces.

    I'm super impressed with the potential of the Vision Pro, especially for the price.
    Exactly i did a quick look in the Apple Store and if you were to purchase a base m2 ipad pro (processor), Airpods Max (audio), and studio display with nano-texture (as the 4k mini led and large display equivalent) it equals almost $3,475 which the Vision Pro has even more features than these devices combined for which $24 more and portable.
    lotoneswatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 21
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,824member
    JP234 said:
    iqatedo said:
    I'm 67 and use 6 categories of Apple products every day. VisionPro would be brilliant for older generations and I'd buy it at launch (likely 18 months or more in my location). However, this device must find relevance with older customers as population demographics move to a much less heavily weighted base (age group) to more of an inverted pyramid. What is most important for my generation and above though is activity. We must remain active - this is one of the prime drivers of better health. If VisionPro can be incorporated into some form of versatile movement regime then it would provide very good value at any price. I am a road cyclist and can ride with friends all over the world on immersive, stationary bikes that provide sensory feedback. I can only imagine what it would be like to wear a VisionPro in such circumstances and for the sceptical, an Australian cyclist won at least one stage in each of two of the world's premier cycling races, the Vuelta a Espãna in Spain and this year's Giro de'italia in Italy after having been picked up by a team based entirely on his performance in what is known as the Zwift Academy (https://www.alpecin-deceuninck.com/news/zwift-academy), purely stationary racing (and some of the most demanding I have attempted). 

    There is so much more to this story. Apple is onto a winner with VisionPro.
    I'm 72, and I'm thinking about your health benefit comment. But I wouldn't want that thing bouncing on my head while I exercise. Sure would like to see some of the newest movie releases on it, though! Theaters these days are WAY too loud for my wife and I, and the millennials and Z'ers don't know who to behave in public. Neither do their children.

    As a fellow roadie, I've seen what those pros go through in training and testing, with and without headsets. Not for me anymore. At our age, we should be out for the fun of it, and not worrying about performance metrics. I even took my Catseye computer off the bike because I kept looking at it. And who knew there were indigo buntings, bobolinks,  Baltimore Orioles and yellow-shafted flickers flying right in front of me all the time!
    Agree with you entirely. Just happens that I like competition but more important is enjoyment, which will keep us going and healthy. I guess the thrust of my post was that oldies could be a valuable market for this technology.
    JP234
  • Reply 16 of 21
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,824member
    Indeed - boomers rock!

    Some competition at our age has us starting with the women. I'm not complaining though  ;)

    Keep safe.
    JP234
  • Reply 17 of 21
    hmlongcohmlongco Posts: 551member
    I could see this as the next "must have" device for kids heading off to college. Perfect for dorm rooms.

    And once they've started using it there....
    tmay
  • Reply 18 of 21
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,574member
    I really think we need to take a step back on this price thing. We know this is a first gen oroduct. We know Apple expects it to be bought by developers and these with the finances. There’s nothing unexpected about that.

    but if Apple came out with a more limited headset, more like the Quest Pro, at about the same price, the criticisms would be dramatic. Apple has been expected to come out with something category leading, and that’s exactly what they’ve done. So it’s expensive. Fine. It doesn’t natter. We see here what Apple can do owning the entire stack, which is far more than anyone else can do.

    no Apple is going to drop the price in another model at some point. Will it have all of the features of this one? Well, likely pretty close, but more affordable to the average person. Apple as we see with their other products sets a minimum performance/feature floor, and every product has to sit on, or above it, until they set it higher some years later. It’s why we don’t see a $300 iPhone, for example.

    so everything for Apple’s AR/VR future has to meet a minimum standard, and this headset is making that minimum clear to everyone. In the long run, where consumers, business and likely the government will all be customers, that makes sense. And many of their customers aren’t price sensitive. There are far more expensive headset solutions for the latter two customer categories than this one, available now.
    tmay
  • Reply 19 of 21
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,680member
     I don’t care who buys it.   We know a bunch will be bought just to tear down.

    I just hope it has some kind of killer app that isn’t porn, but imagine some bizarre 3d-ish porn is coming requiring this thing.   
  • Reply 20 of 21
    agreer4agreer4 Posts: 4member
    So the cohort that’s gonna make this externally expensive, nice to have but not essential device successful is the same crowd complaining that they can’t afford to pay back student loans? Seems like some priority realignment is in order. 
Sign In or Register to comment.