Four charged over murder of carjacking victim who chased thieves with AirTag

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in General Discussion

Four people have been charged for jacking a car and killing the driver, after the victim attempted to recover her vehicle by using Apple's AirTag.

AirTag in a keyring
AirTag in a keyring



On March 19, Victoria Anna Marie Hampton was found wounded by police after a shooting in South West Bakersfield, California. The shooting at 6:32 A.M. resulted in the 61-year-old being taken to hospital that day.

Police say that, following the carjacking, Hampton went after the suspects to try and recover her vehicle. She used a hidden AirTag to track the vehicle, and the car jackers, down.

Hampton died from her injuries on April 1, with a coroner deeming the cause of death to be a shot to the head, reports KGET.

Four suspects have been charged over the matter. David Tyrone Thompson, aged 19, was charged in June with first-degree murder, carjacking, and auto theft. Joseph Bush UV, 23, and Giovanni Garcia-Viscarra, 19, were both charged in July with carjacking, auto theft, and conspiracy.

Fourth-defendant Adam Ransom was sent to Juvenile Court. As his hearings aren't open to the public, Ransom isn't facing a murder charge at the moment.

While keeping track of vehicles and other valuables with AirTag is generally a wise move, it isn't necessarily the best idea to then act upon that information yourself in cases where items are stolen. The usual advice from law enforcement is to provide them with the information and to allow them to deal with the situation.

In April, a Texas truck theft turned fatal after the vehicle's owners tracked it down using AirTag. After catching up, the vehicle's owner shot and killed the suspect while they were inside the truck, possibly in response to seeing a firearm.

While not fatal, an August 22 robbery in New York saw a man's motorbike get stolen. However, the victim tracked down the bike and confronted the thief, only to be rewarded with a broken nose.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,925member

    Four people have been charged for jacking a car and killing the driver, after the victim attempted to recover her vehicle by using Apple's AirTag.

    AirTag in a keyring
    AirTag in a keyring



    On March 19, Victoria Anna Marie Hampton was found wounded by police after a shooting in South West Bakersfield, California. The shooting at 6:32 A.M. resulted in the 61-year-old being taken to hospital that day.

    Police say that, following the carjacking, Hampton went after the suspects to try and recover her vehicle. She used a hidden AirTag to track the vehicle, and the car jackers, down.

    Hampton died from her injuries on April 1, with a coroner deeming the cause of death to be a shot to the head, reports KGET.

    Four suspects have been charged over the matter. David Tyrone Thompson, aged 19, was charged in June with first-degree murder, carjacking, and auto theft. Joseph Bush UV, 23, and Giovanni Garcia-Viscarra, 19, were both charged in July with carjacking, auto theft, and conspiracy.

    Fourth-defendant Adam Ransom was sent to Juvenile Court. As his hearings aren't open to the public, Ransom isn't facing a murder charge at the moment.

    While keeping track of vehicles and other valuables with AirTag is generally a wise move, it isn't necessarily the best idea to then act upon that information yourself in cases where items are stolen. The usual advice from law enforcement is to provide them with the information and to allow them to deal with the situation.

    In April, a Texas truck theft turned fatal after the vehicle's owners tracked it down using AirTag. After catching up, the vehicle's owner shot and killed the suspect while they were inside the truck, possibly in response to seeing a firearm.

    While not fatal, an August 22 robbery in New York saw a man's motorbike get stolen. However, the victim tracked down the bike and confronted the thief, only to be rewarded with a broken nose.

    Read on AppleInsider

    So, it would be nice to know if the people mentioned in this article called the police or not, if they took matters into their own hands because the police did not respond, if they simply didn't wait for the police to respond, ...
    baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 9
    ronnronn Posts: 669member
    Always smarter to contact the police and not put yourself in danger. Even the Texas case mentioned would've been better handled waiting for the police. From previous news stories about this carjacking case, it appears she simply used the AirTag to track down her car and went to retrieve it from the thieves by herself.
    chasmwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 9
    ronn said:
    Always smarter to contact the police and not put yourself in danger. Even the Texas case mentioned would've been better handled waiting for the police. From previous news stories about this carjacking case, it appears she simply used the AirTag to track down her car and went to retrieve it from the thieves by herself.
    Your wise advice is so 2019. These days, defunded police departments often don't have the manpower to respond quickly, if at all. Ah well, at least certain people feel better about themselves for depriving the public of police protection.
    baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    baconstangbaconstang Posts: 1,130member
    They used to hang horse thieves...
    watto_cobraArianneFeldry
  • Reply 5 of 9
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,925member
    ronn said:
    Always smarter to contact the police and not put yourself in danger. Even the Texas case mentioned would've been better handled waiting for the police. From previous news stories about this carjacking case, it appears she simply used the AirTag to track down her car and went to retrieve it from the thieves by herself.
    Your wise advice is so 2019. These days, defunded police departments often don't have the manpower to respond quickly, if at all. Ah well, at least certain people feel better about themselves for depriving the public of police protection.
    Ah, the mythical defunded PD, right, let's blame that bugaboo to support the political narrative we wish to spin.
    ronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 9
    ronnronn Posts: 669member
    ronn said:
    Always smarter to contact the police and not put yourself in danger. Even the Texas case mentioned would've been better handled waiting for the police. From previous news stories about this carjacking case, it appears she simply used the AirTag to track down her car and went to retrieve it from the thieves by herself.
    Your wise advice is so 2019. These days, defunded police departments often don't have the manpower to respond quickly, if at all. Ah well, at least certain people feel better about themselves for depriving the public of police protection.
    WTFAYS? Bakersfield has increased police funding several years in a row. Helped with the passage of Measure N (sales tax increase) that resulted in the hiring of dozens of new officers in pursuit of faster police response times. Address the story and what I wrote, not your right-wing BS.
    chasmwatto_cobramuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 7 of 9
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,427member
    .
    Your wise advice is so 2019. These days, defunded police departments often don't have the manpower to respond quickly, if at all.
    Name a single “defunded” police department. Bonus points if you can even find a big-city police department anywhere in the US that has even had a significant DECREASE in their public safety budget.

    Hint: you can’t. Turn off the propaganda network, and rejoin the real world.

    And stop defaming Bill Watterson’s brilliant work.
    watto_cobraronnmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 8 of 9
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,389member
    Not a result of the none existent "defunding", many local Bay Area police departments have been short staffed for the last 3-5 years. Most lost cops for various reasons including mass retirements. San Jose PD lost several officers do to cutbacks prior to the "defunding" boogeyman. 

    Getting new cops has been a problem partially do to smaller than necessary budget increases and partly do to the inability to find sufficient candidates who could pass the screening process. Most of those failures were due to drug use. There's also the very real issue that these days people don't want to be cops.

    Then there's the problem of getting a new hire to pass their academy. This is not a place where you want a someone to be cut some slack. Some candidates have no business making it to an academy and you wonder why the department thought this person was worth hiring. Often it's the best of a bad lot.

    Oakland PD has been understaffed and has recently graduated a big class. I don't know where they puts them where they are as to where they should be. Many police departments around here have been offering signing bonuses payable over a multi-year contract. So even though none have been defunded, understaffing and getting up to proper staffing have been problematic. OPD is still doing heavy recruiting advertising.

    So not for the reason offered above, response times across the country have been problematic. Even getting a cop to respond at all can be an issue. With some of the major departments around me you won't get a cop to respond to a property crime unless it's pretty significant. They'll take a report over the phone or even online but don't hold your breath to get a cop to respond to your door. Auto burglaries are a prime example. People shoplifting? Have a nice day. To be fair part of that is because certain DAs have been given that a pass. I'm sure there's reluctance to participate in a catch and release program.
    baconstang
  • Reply 9 of 9
    ronnronn Posts: 669member
    More information on the "carjacking" and murder from Sergeant Robert Pair for the Bakersfield Police Department via BakersfieldNow
    "BPD has noticed a significant increase in individuals being in possession of deadly weapons, whether that's knives or guns when they're involved in what is traditionally is viewed as a property crime" Sgt. Pair said.

    Pair encourages the public to let police know if you track and find your stolen property, so that they can confront the suspects.

    "I can understand a certain amount of frustration on response times and that factors into a lot of people then feeling that they may get a quicker response to go out and get their property themselves" Sgt. Pair said.

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