Apple bows to China, starts enforcing App Store rules

Posted:
in General Discussion

Apple has begun requiring new apps to have a licence from the Chinese government before they can be added to the App Store.




China announced its new app laws in August 2023, saying that developers must be either based in the country, or partnered with one that is. There are then privacy issues over where users' personal data is held, but the law primarily gives the Chinese government total control over what apps can be sold in its country.

Previously, it's been believed that China implemented the new law specifically so that it could crack down on social media firms including Facebook and Instagram. Such services are already banned online, but could be accessed via apps.

Apple resisted the law change, to the point of reportedly having staff meet with Chinese officials to object to it. Even following this, Apple still held out despite Chinese protests.

According to Reuters, however, Apple has now begun complying. As of Friday, September 29, 2023, Apple has required developers to submit their Internet Content Provider (ICP) filing when submitting new apps.

China has allowed a grace period for developers to comply, but for new apps that ended in September 2023. Existing apps have until March 2024.

Those existing apps of course include social media ones. With China banning, for instance, Facebook online, it's unlikely that the country's regulators will issue a licence for its app.


Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    “…but at Apple, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right.”

    ’Oh, except over here…’

    Incoming counterarguments about ‘Apple’s a business and has to operate within the laws of the countries it’s in.”  I agree, but don’t say one thing and do another.  Your values are your values.   Otherwise, it’s just a tagline.  


    neoncatctt_zhbeowulfschmidtindigohommegatorguymuthuk_vanalingamgrandact73FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 2 of 11
    neoncatneoncat Posts: 161member
    Of course it's just a tagline, come on now. Apple is a business, and like any business—whether my 1 person shop or a massive multinational like Apple—the goal is to make money. Anything that comes out of the maw of its marketing machine should be considered a highly flexible platitude designed to mollify one audience or another into spending more money. 

    China is a massive market for Apple, as has been reported on this very website. There's no way they're going to put a profit center like that at  risk. 
    davwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    Apple's responsibility is to the shareholders, not the users.  If anything looks like a benefit for users, it's because it's also a benefit to the shareholders.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    igorskyigorsky Posts: 765member
    Incoming counterarguments about ‘Apple’s a business and has to operate within the laws of the countries it’s in.” 
    It’s not a counter argument…it’s the only argument. Not complying risks Apple’s China employees. 

    Grow up. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 11
    Hypocrisy thy name is Apple.
    grandact73
  • Reply 6 of 11
    sbdudesbdude Posts: 277member
    Hypocrisy thy name is Apple.
    And every other western company doing business in China. Like this is something new.
    FileMakerFellerAlex1Nigorskywatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,387member
    sbdude said:
    Hypocrisy thy name is Apple.
    And every other western company doing business in China. Like this is something new.
    “…but at Apple, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right.”

    ’Oh, except over here…’

    Incoming counterarguments about ‘Apple’s a business and has to operate within the laws of the countries it’s in.”  I agree, but don’t say one thing and do another.  Your values are your values.   Otherwise, it’s just a tagline.  


    There's the difference...
    macike
  • Reply 8 of 11
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,415member
    Did you guys read the same article I did?

    How does this law directly compromise Apple users’ privacy outside China?

    This law requires *developers* to be based in China or have a local Chinese partner. There is some **thus far unfounded** concerns over possible user privacy, but this appears to affect mostly social media apps — which have always had zero user privacy, so I”m not sure what you think has changed on that front.
    badmonkFileMakerFellerAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    Of course Apple did.
  • Reply 10 of 11
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,319member
    So Apple has values beyond a duty to make money for its shareholders but at the end of the day it is a business and not a revolutionary movement.  It’s a choice between kicking up sand and taking one’s pail home or working with your playmates in the sandbox to advocate for what is important for you.

    The bottom line is businesses have to follow the law or leave.

    I would argue it is better for Chinese citizens and the world at large if Apple stays in China and advocates for a better day.

    Though China is going in the wrong direction, turning it into an isolated pariah state like North Korea does nobody a favor.
    FileMakerFellertmayAlex1Nigorskywatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 11
    igorsky said:
    Incoming counterarguments about ‘Apple’s a business and has to operate within the laws of the countries it’s in.” 
    It’s not a counter argument…it’s the only argument. Not complying risks Apple’s China employees. 

    Grow up. 
    Hah; thanks.  I’ll try to grow up.
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