Public opinion of Apple Vision Pro is all over the place, with some calling it a glorified...

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in Apple Vision Pro
Apple Vision Pro launches on February 2, and public discourse surrounding the product indicates it is very divisive, even among Apple employees.

Apple Vision Pro sits on a pedestal surrounded by people out of focus in the background. It has a black visor and white bands.
Apple Vision Pro

Apple revealed the Apple Vision Pro during
WWDC with a sub-10-minute video showing the product's features and some discussion of the developer story. Since then, very little information has been shared about the product, even just before its launch, so public discourse has filled the void.

On the one hand, there are people who don't see it as more than an overpriced iPad you wear on your face with no addressable market. On the other hand, you see the usual unstoppable hype around an Apple product launch amplified more so by the fact it's a brand-new platform.

Oddly enough, there doesn't seem to be any overtly wrong answers among popular opinion. Apple Vision Pro can be both an incredibly niche product and a completely fascinating peek into the future at once.

A glorified dev tool



The sudden change in discourse around Apple Vision Pro could have given you whiplash if you weren't prepared for it. Fresh from the new year, conversations were mostly positive, with a hopeful outlook toward what Apple's $3,500 headset could be used for.

Suddenly, speculation about a potential second event and a mountain of questions being answered was squashed by a simple Apple Newsroom PR post. Apple Vision Pro was coming on February 2 with pre-orders beginning January 19.

It was as if Apple let all the air out of the room for half the population. Suddenly, influential members of the tech community began referring to Apple Vision Pro as a dev tool disguised as a consumer product.



While Christina Warren may not have been the first to say it, her comments about Apple Vision Pro being a dev tool quickly propagated across social media.

It's not an altogether outrageous sentiment. Apple has asked developers to create apps for a platform that only a handful has actually seen firsthand, which means true app development won't begin until after release day.

The initial run of Apple Vision Pro orders will undoubtedly be for developers, extreme enthusiasts, journalists, and the rich. So, calling it a glorified dev tool isn't far off.

Despite that, Apple has pushed consumer-focused content hard in the lead-up to pre-orders. Over 150 3D movies, 8K immersive experiences, and VR-style games on Apple Arcade were part of Apple's push.

Disney+ on Apple Vision Pro showing Tatooine as an immersive scene
Disney+ on Apple Vision Pro showing Tatooine as an immersive scene



Disney+ has even hopped on board the hype train with an Apple Vision Pro app built with immersive environments to sit in while watching movies. These environments include the "Monster's Inc." scare floor and sitting in a landspeeder on Tatooine from "Star Wars."

However, other big companies aren't looking to capture the niche audience. Netflix won't build an app for visionOS, nor will it allow its iPad app to automatically port to the platform. YouTube and Spotify have joined in that sentiment and will no doubt be joined by others.

From the start, Apple has pushed Apple Vision Pro as a consumer product, so it's hard to see it as a glorified dev tool. Regardless, Apple Vision Pro lives and dies by its customers, and people do seem excited.

Not all is doom and gloom



As with any Apple product release, there's plenty of hype around Apple Vision Pro. Developers building apps are posting screenshots of the simulator tool, journalists are discussing their hands-on experience with the device, and fans are contemplating exactly how it might be used in their day-to-day.

We ran a poll on X to see what feature people are most excited about. Persona didn't even register on the spectrum of excitement, but it seems people who follow AppleInsider are excited to try 3D content and 8K immersive experiences.

Apple Vision Pro pre orders are in only a few days. Even if you're not buying one, what feature stands out as most exciting or unique that you'd like to try out?#Apple #AppleVisionPro

-- AppleInsider (@appleinsider)



People are very interested in the gesture and eye control features. Anyone who has used the headset says it is precise and quickly becomes second nature.

Of course, we at AppleInsider have varying levels of indifference and excitement among our ranks. The author of this article is particularly excited and will attempt to work from Apple Vision Pro, for example.

Apple employees do exist on social media, though they tend to be rather private. The ones on the Apple Vision Pro and visionOS team have been slipping to the surface to celebrate the device release.

When Apple revealed the release date, Mastodon was filled with Apple employees linking to Apple's announcement. They reiterated the usual Apple byline, except coming from humans, it felt more sincere -- "can't wait to see what you do with it."



Of course, social posts from Apple employees are likely vetted or, at the least, carefully considered. No one would willingly go onto their social media and bad mouth a product they made at Apple unless they wanted a quick exit.

A change of tune internally



Apple is a very secretive company, and because of that, employees can't say much about their jobs outside of closed doors. Anything said publicly will likely never be critical of Apple or its products.

Apple's Photo app icon viewed in 3D from Apple Vision Pro. It's an abstract flower with petals colored like the rainbow popping off of a white round icon.
Apple Vision Pro and visionOS was built by many employees, all with their own opinions



Internally, things change. The people working at Apple are human, after all, and hold opinions about the company they work for and the products being released.

Regarding Apple Vision Pro, sentiments are as mixed inside Apple as they are out. Some employees AppleInsider has spoken to anonymously have said they wouldn't purchase Apple Vision Pro, nor would it fit with their workflows.

Apple Vision Pro is a niche product with a very specific user group in mind. Being a part of a greater team doesn't automatically make you its biggest fan, and if anything, it gives you a more informed opinion than most.

February 2



Initial shipments and in-store pickup begin on February 2 after pre-orders on January 19. As much speculation and commentary that exists online, nothing can replace experience.

Stay tuned to AppleInsdier for every conceivable detail about Apple Vision Pro and whether it truly signifies the future of computing.



Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,378member
    Public opinion from people who've never used the device is largely irrelevant.  And just because Christina Warren (who even knows who she is) says it wasn't the best experience for her, doesn't mean it will be the same for everyone else.  Indeed, I would like to hear what percentage of women like a "thing" on their face versus men.  I have a gut feeling more of the ladies probably would find it less than desirable, versus men, and not merely because of makeup either.  

    I look forward to the opinion of the USERS of the device over time.  That's what matters most.
    watto_cobradanox
  • Reply 2 of 35
    Just like the iPhone when it came out! 
    9secondkox2williamlondonwatto_cobradanox
  • Reply 3 of 35
    Christina can be right about her own discomfort. Only she knows. But she is absolutely wrong when claiming that a dev kit cannot be a direct to consumer (D2C) device. It doesn’t matter how many times she claims that. The truth is immune to brainwashing. Of course a device can be both. Many devices are, and have been.

    If a dev kit is designed in a way that it is accessible and appealing to general consumers, not just professional developers, it could also be marketed as a D2C product.

    I’m not saying she is correct in qualifying this as a dev kit. I’m just saying it can be both that and a D2C device. So in essence, she’s dead wrong in her main claim.
    edited January 19 tht9secondkox2williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 35
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,316member
    The launch is reminding me of the initial skepticism greeting the iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch launches.  I suspect it will follow the trajectory of the watch, slow at first until Apple and users find the way (initially the watch was marked as personalized fashion but later the health focus came to predominate as the reason to own it).

    I think also of the initial launch of the AirPod.  At first I was self-conscious about wearing them and now I would never think of not using my AirPods Pro with noise cancellation when I am in a noisy urban environment.  We have come to accept people covering up their ears with bulky headphones, why not the same with eyes?

    I see a bright future for this tech-

    ALS and neuromuscular diseases

    Technical and medical training, including the proverbial you tube how to videos.

    Meditation and self improvement 

    Movies

    Spectator sports

    Gaming

    but unfortunately it will probably be the adult industry that will be the big factor in widespread adoption.
    danoxiOS_Guy80williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 35
    It’s a product that wasn’t ready to leave the lab. Needed a couple years to distill into a pair of sunglasses. Only then should it have launched. 

    Sad to see Apple rush this. What could have been revolutionary is just a better headset. This hurts future iterations more than helps. 

    But even when Apple is ready with the one form factor they should have approved, it will still be more of an Apple Watch type companion device. Marketed like that, it will do great. But trying to push it as a takeover is just not something people want. 
    canukstorm
  • Reply 6 of 35
    danoxdanox Posts: 3,048member
    It’s a product that wasn’t ready to leave the lab. Needed a couple years to distill into a pair of sunglasses. Only then should it have launched. 

    Sad to see Apple rush this. What could have been revolutionary is just a better headset. This hurts future iterations more than helps. 

    But even when Apple is ready with the one form factor they should have approved, it will still be more of an Apple Watch type companion device. Marketed like that, it will do great. But trying to push it as a takeover is just not something people want. 

    Take a long look at the original iPhone in 2007 and one in 2024, the overall size isn't that different than today in fact its bigger, battery tech and SOC's/modems/cameras are at least 15 years away from a eye glass solution and Apple is the only company that has even a chance because everything needed has to be done in house inside one company (a vertical computer company) to get really small, exterior design, OS software, and chip SOC engineering intergrated together.

    Intel, Nvidia, and AMD are still burning down barns with their cpu's/gpu's. They currently can't even build an efficient laptop yet with performance and battery life, and Google/Meta/Samsung's OS hardware capabilities at a MeToo level.

    How can Apple be in a rush the competition is still very far behind even AI is a question mark because the company that will lead in the end has to combine all elements under one roof soc/OS/program software/hardware to lead anywhere in so-called AI which can't be done as a tech piecemeal project over the long haul.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 35
    badmonk said:
    The launch is reminding me of the initial skepticism greeting the iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch launches.  I suspect it will follow the trajectory of the watch, slow at first until Apple and users find the way (initially the watch was marked as personalized fashion but later the health focus came to predominate as the reason to own it).

    I think also of the initial launch of the AirPod.  At first I was self-conscious about wearing them and now I would never think of not using my AirPods Pro with noise cancellation when I am in a noisy urban environment.  We have come to accept people covering up their ears with bulky headphones, why not the same with eyes?

    I see a bright future for this tech-

    ALS and neuromuscular diseases

    Technical and medical training, including the proverbial you tube how to videos.

    Meditation and self improvement 

    Movies

    Spectator sports

    Gaming

    but unfortunately it will probably be the adult industry that will be the big factor in widespread adoption.
    Why is adult entertainment unfortunate? Adult entertainment is as legitimate a business as gaming, sports and non-adult movies.
    edited January 19 avon b7tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 35
    have you ever noticed that every pundit knows no more about a subject than you do?

    I don't  give a rip  about what anyone has to say,
    watto_cobra40domi
  • Reply 9 of 35
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,479member
    I do understand Christina Warren’s interpretation of the Apple Vision Pro being a “dev kit” if it’s viewed as being analogous to what the Apple I computer represented when it was first released. Nobody here has to be reminded about how far Apple computers have come since the Apple I hit the market. To fully understand this relative perspective you have to fast forward to where we are today in terms of state of the art technology, where something as obviously complex and sophisticated as the Apple Vision Pro is a modern analogy to what was a circuit board screwed to a piece of plywood in the mid 1970s. The Apple I was truly a “dev kit” with limited appeal and in relative terms a sizable expense for anyone that wasn’t attuned to the potential the Apple I represented.

    We absolutely have come so far since the mid 70s that something as exciting and amazing as the Apple Vision Pro can still be viewed as “dev kit” if you have an inkling of what it currently represents in its nascent form compared to its future potential. The Apple Vision Pro is what it is, and hopefully it’s the beginning of a new way of human-computer interaction and spatial computing that will change how we think about personal computing in the 21st century. Don’t sell it short, but also don’t oversell it as the be-all end-all. Until there is an Apple Vision Pro 2 it still must prove itself with consumers as being the start of something as influential as what the Apple I turned out to be.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 35
    I’m not sure I need one, but I want one.  Whether I buy or not will come down to desire and money.  But every time Apple introduces a new category of product or device, the media has predicted failure from day one.  Except DED.   And yet everyone one of them became the best and best selling product in its class.  So let the naysayers blather on.  Once again, the people who count will decide: The consumers.
    watto_cobraam844940domi
  • Reply 11 of 35
    Unless you are single, the movie aspect of this device is just a silly premise. I cannot imagine donning this device and telling my family: “I’ll see you in 2 hrs after I watch this amazing 8k movie”. 

    This is a single user device that can’t be used at the same time as anyone else in the household. And its use within a household just isolates people. 

    I’m not denying the advancements in the technology or anything that, but even this hardcore Apple fan boy is having trouble justifying the huge cost for something with such a minimal use case. 

    …and I don’t know I really buy into the productivity side of it either. In theory, it seems really cool. But I can’t do all my work on it, so using it at all would be pointless. 
    muthuk_vanalingamdewmewilliamlondonM68000gatorguy
  • Reply 12 of 35
    ciacia Posts: 262member
    I'm confused about the "8K immersive video".  The displays built into the VP are 4K on each eye.  How do you see 8K video on 4K displays?

    If you watch 8K video on a 1080p monitor, you're watching 1080p video. 
    rezwitswatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 35
    XedXed Posts: 2,675member
    cia said:
    I'm confused about the "8K immersive video".  The displays built into the VP are 4K on each eye.  How do you see 8K video on 4K displays?

    If you watch 8K video on a 1080p monitor, you're watching 1080p video. 
    I can't give you a detailed answer about the 8K, but I can say that your premise that they are only 4K images is wrong. 


    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 35
    badmonk said:
    but unfortunately it will probably be the adult industry that will be the big factor in widespread adoption.
    As always. 

    QuickTime was labeled as a gimmick nobody was interested in back in 1992. But then the “Adult” industry saw an interest and demonstrated a real-world use. And *then* everybody suddenly became interested in the tech. (Microsoft and Intel felt the need to rush to the gold mine with AVI when the “Adult” industry began to use QuickTime.)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 35
    Amidst all the naysaying about Vision Pro, it's important to remember that at the dawn of the PC age, no one exactly knew why there'd be a need to have a computer in the  home. Even the simplest applications, like email and the internet as we know them today did not exist for the average person. So why would anyone need or want a personal computer except for the niche nerd market and a rich person's toy. Sound familiar? You could have classified the home computer back then as "a glorified dev tool" and you wouldn't have been wrong. Of course, no one would question the endless uses for a home computer today. 

    I don't know if the Vision Pro will ultimately be successful. But I'm smart enough to know--especially after having witnessed the evolution of the home computer--that no one knows the destiny of Vision Pro yet. 
    thtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 35
    XedXed Posts: 2,675member
    charlesn said:
    Amidst all the naysaying about Vision Pro, it's important to remember that at the dawn of the PC age, no one exactly knew why there'd be a need to have a computer in the  home. Even the simplest applications, like email and the internet as we know them today did not exist for the average person. So why would anyone need or want a personal computer except for the niche nerd market and a rich person's toy. Sound familiar? You could have classified the home computer back then as "a glorified dev tool" and you wouldn't have been wrong. Of course, no one would question the endless uses for a home computer today. 

    I don't know if the Vision Pro will ultimately be successful. But I'm smart enough to know--especially after having witnessed the evolution of the home computer--that no one knows the destiny of Vision Pro yet. 
    It was expensive, big, loud, and did almost nothing, and yet somehow we all now have them on our persons. It's almost as if technology progresses. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 35
    danoxdanox Posts: 3,048member
    have you ever noticed that every pundit knows no more about a subject than you do?

    I don't  give a rip  about what anyone has to say,

    Many pundits/reporters don't do their homework over the years (amnesia) however a few do, and those that do they are usually not the most popular.
    thtwilliamlondonmattinozwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 35
    danoxdanox Posts: 3,048member
    mike123 said:
    Unless you are single, the movie aspect of this device is just a silly premise. I cannot imagine donning this device and telling my family: “I’ll see you in 2 hrs after I watch this amazing 8k movie”. 

    This is a single user device that can’t be used at the same time as anyone else in the household. And its use within a household just isolates people. 

    I’m not denying the advancements in the technology or anything that, but even this hardcore Apple fan boy is having trouble justifying the huge cost for something with such a minimal use case. 

    …and I don’t know I really buy into the productivity side of it either. In theory, it seems really cool. But I can’t do all my work on it, so using it at all would be pointless. 
    Why are you worried once your kids reach junior high school age they are going to close their door on you and say see ya, the only time you will see them is at feeding time and in the morning asking for money before school. :smile: 
    edited January 21 watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 35
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 2,369member
    badmonk said:
    The launch is reminding me of the initial skepticism greeting the iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch launches.  I suspect it will follow the trajectory of the watch, slow at first until Apple and users find the way (initially the watch was marked as personalized fashion but later the health focus came to predominate as the reason to own it).

    I think also of the initial launch of the AirPod.  At first I was self-conscious about wearing them and now I would never think of not using my AirPods Pro with noise cancellation when I am in a noisy urban environment.  We have come to accept people covering up their ears with bulky headphones, why not the same with eyes?

    I see a bright future for this tech-

    ALS and neuromuscular diseases

    Technical and medical training, including the proverbial you tube how to videos.

    Meditation and self improvement 

    Movies

    Spectator sports

    Gaming

    but unfortunately it will probably be the adult industry that will be the big factor in widespread adoption.
    Can you name other tech, especially a visual one that has taken off without the adult industry being an early adopter?

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 35
    XedXed Posts: 2,675member
    mattinoz said:
    badmonk said:
    The launch is reminding me of the initial skepticism greeting the iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch launches.  I suspect it will follow the trajectory of the watch, slow at first until Apple and users find the way (initially the watch was marked as personalized fashion but later the health focus came to predominate as the reason to own it).

    I think also of the initial launch of the AirPod.  At first I was self-conscious about wearing them and now I would never think of not using my AirPods Pro with noise cancellation when I am in a noisy urban environment.  We have come to accept people covering up their ears with bulky headphones, why not the same with eyes?

    I see a bright future for this tech-

    ALS and neuromuscular diseases

    Technical and medical training, including the proverbial you tube how to videos.

    Meditation and self improvement 

    Movies

    Spectator sports

    Gaming

    but unfortunately it will probably be the adult industry that will be the big factor in widespread adoption.
    Can you name other tech, especially a visual one that has taken off without the adult industry being an early adopter?

    Even Christianity had Mary Magdalene. :wink: 
    watto_cobra
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