Apple's 2024 iPad & iPhone chip plan has been detailed in a new leak

Posted:
in iPad edited March 1

A low-profile leaker with a very good track record has spelled out what they believe to be Apple's entire iPad chip plan and what chips they expect to see in the iPhone 16.

Using iPad Pro and Apple Pencil
Using iPad Pro and Apple Pencil



The data spans multiple posts and products. Detailed in one post are the code names for the iPad, iPad mini, iPad Air, and iPad Pro.

To not expose the leaker who has a very short follow list and has protected posts, we've taken the text directly out of their posts. The first column is the chip identifier, and the third number associated with each device is the internal codenames, which, in some cases, we've seen before.

iPad

  • t8101 0x18 j381ap

  • t8101 0x1A j382ap



The t8101 processor is the A14 Bionic, first released in September 2020. The leaker does not call these identifiers the 11th-generation iPad, so it's unclear what this is.

It's unclear why Apple would release an 11th generation iPad with A14 again, given that the last refresh with the iPad Pro-style redesign already sports that processor.

An internals refresh of the ninth-generation model that retains Touch ID with the A14 is possible, but seems unlikely. It's possible that the main client for this iPad remaining, education, is demanding it.

2024 iPad mini

  • t8130 0x08 j410ap

  • t8130 0x0A j411ap



Apple's t8130 is the A17 chip. This is a notable update from the A15 in the existing model.

2024 iPad Air

  • t8112 0x10 j507ap

  • t8112 0x12 j508ap

  • t8112 0x14 j537ap

  • t8112 0x16 j538ap



The T8112 processor is the M2 chip that is presently found in the iPad Pro series.

OLED iPad Pro

  • t8132 0x08 j717ap

  • t8132 0x0A j718ap

  • t8132 0x0C j720ap

  • t8132 0x0E j721ap



The T8132 is likely the M3 for iPad, as has been rumored for some time.

A second post summarizes what they expect from the iPhone 16 family of devices. As it has been for a few years, they expect four models.

iPhone 16 lineup

  • t8140 0x08 d47ap

  • t8140 0x0A d48ap

  • t8140 0x0C d93ap

  • t8140 0x0E d94ap



The T8140 processor is unknown, but is presumably the A18 chip expected this year. If the report is correct, that means that Apple's flagships will all get the same processor again, despite what Apple has done for the last few releases. A report by MacRumors on Friday says that the leaker told them that the Pro models would get the fully-functional chip, while the non-pro models would get binned versions with fewer CPU or performance cores.

The iPad Pro and iPad Air refreshes are expected in March at some point, in an event, or by press release. The iPhone 16 is obviously expected in the fall of 2024.

The iPad mini timetable is less certain. Some rumors peg it for the spring, while others place it in the fall.

As far as it pertains to the accuracy of the leaker, they went quiet and secure after they published something notable years ago. Since then, they've accurately been posting build numbers of betas hours and sometimes days before release.

Rumor Score: Likely

Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    So will we see a big screen iPad Air?
  • Reply 2 of 21
    thttht Posts: 5,437member
    So will we see a big screen iPad Air?
    It's looking likely. The iPad Air 11 and 12.9 inch display models will have M2 SoCs. Not talked much is whether it will have Touch ID or Face ID. I think everyone assumes it will have Touch ID. Pricing is going to be a big player on well these sell. If it is $600 and $800, it would be great. $800 for the 12.9" model would be a great, but given inflation, hard to believe Apple could set it there.
  • Reply 3 of 21
    thttht Posts: 5,437member
    It's unclear why Apple would release an 11th generation iPad with A14 again, given that the last refresh with the iPad Pro-style redesign already sports that processor.
    They have to get this model to $330 to $350. Hopefully after a couple of years, the costs of making it will result in a $70 to $100 price decrease.
  • Reply 4 of 21
    One can only imagine A17 coming to base iPad this year
  • Reply 5 of 21
    AniMillAniMill Posts: 155member
    I’ve had an iPad Pro 11” since its first iteration. It’s always been brilliant and it still serves me just fine - but with a pretty cracked screen. I considered getting it fixed (I did have Apple Care + but somehow didn’t renew :-( ), so I’m looking forward to the new 12.9” Air. As long as I can run Astropad Studio with Apple Pen being pressurize sensitive, that would be gold. I’m guessing the cellular version w/512 is going to be at least $1250, and that’s OK.
  • Reply 6 of 21
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,291member
    One explanation for the reuse of the A14 is that Apple will offer an 11th gen iPad AND a 10-gen iPad for cheaper, just as they do not with the 10th and 9th gens. The 11th gen iPad would get a better chip, but the 10th gen would stay with the chip it has now, i.e. the A14.
  • Reply 7 of 21
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,702member
    Dang. With Apple silicon maturing, we are seeing ALL of Apple’s devices basically becoming supercomputers. Phones? Insane power levels. iPad? Even more? Mac? Get outta here! 

    This is a glorious golden age for Apple. Amazing. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 8 of 21
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 832member
    Hardware improvements have yet to be a solution to iPad's longer-term sales growth problem, so this upcoming round of "faster, more powerful, blah, blah, blah" is unlikely to solve it now. Perhaps the OLED screens will spark a mini wave of iPad Pro upgrades until that quickly fizzles out. And then we're back to moribund growth in this key product line for Apple. As for the bigger iPad Air--I dunno, thus far, sales for Apple's larger sizes for non-pro products--the iPhone Plus and the MBA 15"--are said to be disappointing following a short-lived sprint out of the gate. And in the case of iPhone and MBA, there is very compelling consumer data to show that these larger sizes should have been outright hits. I don't think that's the case for the ungainly 12.9" iPad. 

    More than yet another unnecessarily faster processor in a tablet that has been overpowered for years, Apple needs to make iPad OS newly compelling. I feel like Apple keeps nibbling at the edges with the iPad OS, turning something outright kludgy into something somewhat less kludgy. (I'm looking at you, Stage Manager.) But until Apple makes what iPad can do seem exciting again, sales growth will continue to be in a slump. 

    And look, I get it--iPad is still, by bar, the best tablet out there. Apple continues to own the profits in the tablet market. But if Apple wants to continue to be recognized by investors as a growth company, then it needs to keep growing. Right now, only its current product lines can carry that growth burden. Apple Car is dead. And mainstream Vision Pro success, IF that were to happen, is still at least a few (and probably more) years away. Maybe Apple will surprise us with a revitalized iPad OS at this year's WWDC. 
    edited March 1 entropysradarthekatChris_Pelhammuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 21
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,404member
    Yeah, get me some more innovation, baby!!!!
  • Reply 10 of 21
    What chips? Isn’t it obvious? AGI or at least AI chips.
  • Reply 11 of 21
    Apple has finally publicly pivoted towards GenAI instead of keeping it hidden and discreet.

    Extrapolating current trends then n a few years Services will contribute 50% of total gross margin so any hardware strategy will be built around enabling this as Services is 2x gross margin compared to devices.

    I expect that Apple’s silicon choices are guided by unit economics and to provide a broad base of adoption for upcoming services. This may mean that all devices will have a healthy uplift in Neural engine capacity and GPU capacity as a priority. Further it seems that Apples confidence in TMSC process capability is increasing and thus the AS chip may be less of a device category differentiator.

    I can see Apple also ensuring that more devices can do spatial video, so any AS oomph needed to power that will be widely deployed.

    I agree with some other posts saying that upgraded AS is not a selling point for most people. However the services that are then possible will be a selling point for new devices.
    tenthousandthingstmaywilliamlondonChris_Pelham
  • Reply 12 of 21
    multimediamultimedia Posts: 1,035member
    I’m happy with my very expensive 16GB 2TB M1 iPad Pro from 2020. What’s the rush to upgrade?

    As far as I can tell by reading all the tea leaves, it looks like a skip M3 year to me. M4 looks to be like the descendent of the A18 Pro to me. And I don’t plan on upgrading my 1TB USB-C A17 Pro iPhone 15 Pro Max either unless the 16 Pro Max is available in a 2TB variation. And even then it’s only a definite maybe.

    I’m running the base M2 Pro Mac mini and I don’t see any reason to even go up to a base M3 Max Mac Studio this year. I see the M4 series or even the M5 series as worth waiting for to get a real leap in performance because of the expanded neural engine for super duper AI stuff coming in iOS 18/19 and iPad OS 18/19.

    I see late 2025-2026 as the time to pull the trigger on upgrades not this year.
    edited March 2
  • Reply 13 of 21
    […]

    I agree with some other posts saying that upgraded AS is not a selling point for most people. However the services that are then possible will be a selling point for new devices.
    +1 — “software sells systems” — the Apple credo in a nutshell. Perhaps we can update it to “services sell systems,” but often (not always) it’s hardware that brings new features in software/services.

    The enhanced GPU capabilities (mesh shading, etc.) in A17/M3, for example, will move the needle — I think you’ll start seeing it in the system requirements, the software/service will still run without it, but for the full experience, you need A17/M3. 
    edited March 2
  • Reply 14 of 21
    Seems like the big news in this leak is all new phones will get A18.

    I’ll guess they’ll differentiate between A18 and A18 Pro, but we’ll see. 
  • Reply 15 of 21
    neilmneilm Posts: 987member
    I’m happy with my very expensive 16GB 2TB M1 iPad Pro from 2020. What’s the rush to upgrade?
    And that’s the only issue with the iPad, pretty much across the entire line: they’re more than adequate for what they’re called upon to do. Even older models like my own 2017 10.5" iPad Pro are still viable. 
    I’m ready to replace it because the battery has noticeably degraded, but otherwise it’s still terrific. 
    No wonder sales growth is sluggish — iPads just keep on going. 
    mobird
  • Reply 16 of 21
    thttht Posts: 5,437member
    neilm said:
    I’m happy with my very expensive 16GB 2TB M1 iPad Pro from 2020. What’s the rush to upgrade?
    And that’s the only issue with the iPad, pretty much across the entire line: they’re more than adequate for what they’re called upon to do. Even older models like my own 2017 10.5" iPad Pro are still viable. 
    I’m ready to replace it because the battery has noticeably degraded, but otherwise it’s still terrific. 
    No wonder sales growth is sluggish — iPads just keep on going. 
    I’m fully ready to replace my iPP10.5 256GB. It’s getting sluggish with iPadOS 17, or its battery can’t provide the power to drive the SoC at its peak performance anymore. 4 GB RAM is also constraining for modern apps and websites. 

    It truly is the year for it to be replaced.

    An iPP13 with M3 16GB 2TB is going to have at least 4x or more of everything. Hopefully Stage Manager will be expanded to have 16 windows per Stage, or have outright unlimited windows. 
  • Reply 17 of 21
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 832member
    I’m happy with my very expensive 16GB 2TB M1 iPad Pro from 2020. What’s the rush to upgrade?
    That's the question facing all of Apple's product lines right now. The correct answer would be: new and compelling capabilities that require new hardware. I still think Apple was caught flat-footed with AI and I haven't found Tim Cook's comments to be particularly reassuring that they weren't. I'm more interested than ever in WWDC this year and anxious to hear about Apple's plans/strategy when it comes to AI. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 18 of 21
    I can’t imagine how Apple can convince and keep buyers on Apple products if the end-point on-device chip, like A18, A19, M4, M5 etc. do not have AI /AGI capabilities.  
  • Reply 19 of 21
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,642member
    I can’t imagine how Apple can convince and keep buyers on Apple products if the end-point on-device chip, like A18, A19, M4, M5 etc. do not have AI /AGI capabilities.  
    Exactly what makes a chip AI capable?
  • Reply 20 of 21
    charlesn said:
    I’m happy with my very expensive 16GB 2TB M1 iPad Pro from 2020. What’s the rush to upgrade?
    That's the question facing all of Apple's product lines right now. The correct answer would be: new and compelling capabilities that require new hardware. I still think Apple was caught flat-footed with AI and I haven't found Tim Cook's comments to be particularly reassuring that they weren't. I'm more interested than ever in WWDC this year and anxious to hear about Apple's plans/strategy when it comes to AI. 

    I recently picked up the most current iPad Pro 12.9.  I expect it to do what I need it to do for the next few years at least.  I might be convinced to trade it in for a new model, but OLED isn't compelling for me.
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