Samsung overtakes Apple to become world's leading smartphone vendor

Posted:
in iPhone

It's less a case of popularity, and more about release cycles, but Samsung is again the number one smartphone manufacturer in the world.

Two smartphones, one from Apple with a triple camera setup and one from Samsung with a single camera, displayed on a grid background.
Apple's iPhone 15 Pro (left) and Samsung's Galaxy S24



Apple took the global top spot for smartphone sales inSeptember 2023, and a later analysis of the whole year confirmed its position. Apple had similar success in specific regions, such as Europe.

According to the Korea Times, however, the roles have now reversed. Based on figures for February 2024, the publication reports that Samsung captured a 20% share of the market.

In that month, Apple took 18%. That translates to Apple selling 17.41 million iPhones, while Samsung sold 19.69 million units spanning its entire range with retail prices as low as $80.

Neither Samsung nor Apple can really boast of being number one. For while it isn't exactly as if the two swap places to a schedule, it's very close to that.

So Apple taking the top spot in September 2023 will have been because of the launch of the iPhone 15 range. And Samsung's victory in February is because that's when its latest Galaxy S24 models went on sale.

The Korea Times reports that Samsung has sold 6.53 million of the Galaxy S24 so far.

Then based on data from January 2024, Samsung reportedly rose from 20% to 36% of the US market. At the same time, Apple in its post holiday, post launch stage in the cycle, dropped from 64% to 48%.

Apple's taking the crown over the whole of 2023 may be more significant. For year-round, Samsung typically has an advantage over Apple because it sells so very many more different smartphone models to hit different price points.

Overall, though, smartphone sales have tended to be in decline worldwide, particularly in China. Apple still topped the chart in Japan in the latest figures from March 2024, but that market has shrunk.



Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    ssfe11ssfe11 Posts: 30member
    Hey clueless DOJ do you know how to read? How can a company be a monopoly when they don’t even sell the most of the product?! DOJ Apple case is so absurd. 
    davBart YMacProwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    nubusnubus Posts: 412member
    ssfe11 said:
    Hey clueless DOJ do you know how to read? How can a company be a monopoly when they don’t even sell the most of the product?! DOJ Apple case is so absurd. 
    World != US
    Xedwatto_cobrawilliamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 11
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,277member
    ssfe11 said:
    Hey clueless DOJ do you know how to read? How can a company be a monopoly when they don’t even sell the most of the product?! DOJ Apple case is so absurd. 
    The US market share matters, where Apple's iPhone approaches 65% control. The worldwide share does not.
  • Reply 4 of 11
    ssfe11ssfe11 Posts: 30member
    Ok even if it’s just US 65% that means 1/3 of the US or 125m people CHOOSE another smartphone. Not even close to being a monopoly. Standard Oil was 100%, Msft was 98%. As Appleinsider said and the overwhelming  consensus  says…Apple will destroy the DOJ case
    rob53tmayAllMBart YMacProwatto_cobrawilliamlondon
  • Reply 5 of 11
    teejay2012teejay2012 Posts: 382member
    gatorguy said:
    ssfe11 said:
    Hey clueless DOJ do you know how to read? How can a company be a monopoly when they don’t even sell the most of the product?! DOJ Apple case is so absurd. 
    The US market share matters, where Apple's iPhone approaches 65% control. The worldwide share does not.

    From one source it was 58.1% in 2023 up from 57.7% in 2022. Another source had it at 56.9%, which is close. The highest country of iPhone ownership is Japan at 69.2%. No surprise that Japan is also planning to introduce a “Digital Antitrust Law,”  to compel Apple and I think Google to enable “application side loading” and “third-party payment” options within the Japanese market. But from reports, Japan does not seem to be aiming to hobble or even break up Apple like the EU or DOJ seems to be from their rhetoric.
    thtssfe11Bart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    Market share is not the whole story; to show an illegal monopoly, the DOJ will have to prove that Apple maintains that market share by coercion, market manipulation or price manipulation. If US consumers simply prefer iPhones by a 2 to 1 margin, that’s not illegal. The case, as filed, faces some real challenges.
    gatorguytmayssfe11Bart Ywatto_cobrawilliamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 11
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,257member
    Market share is not the whole story; to show an illegal monopoly, the DOJ will have to prove that Apple maintains that market share by coercion, market manipulation or price manipulation. If US consumers simply prefer iPhones by a 2 to 1 margin, that’s not illegal. The case, as filed, faces some real challenges.
    This happens in every market and rarely anything happens. Ford sells more trucks than any other company. Has the DOJ looked into any market manipulation by Ford? What about all their, and GM’s, manipulation of the truth? Even Microsoft just got off with a hand slap while they continue to coerce and manipulate the PC market. The US government is the largest user of Microsoft products, forcing everyone to use their server products with expensive client licenses yet nothing from the DOJ. 
    ssfe11watto_cobrawilliamlondon
  • Reply 8 of 11
    YP101YP101 Posts: 162member
    Now DOJ will sue Samsung too?
    AllMMacProwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,362member
    rob53 said:
    Market share is not the whole story; to show an illegal monopoly, the DOJ will have to prove that Apple maintains that market share by coercion, market manipulation or price manipulation. If US consumers simply prefer iPhones by a 2 to 1 margin, that’s not illegal. The case, as filed, faces some real challenges.
    This happens in every market and rarely anything happens. Ford sells more trucks than any other company. Has the DOJ looked into any market manipulation by Ford? What about all their, and GM’s, manipulation of the truth? Even Microsoft just got off with a hand slap while they continue to coerce and manipulate the PC market. The US government is the largest user of Microsoft products, forcing everyone to use their server products with expensive client licenses yet nothing from the DOJ. 
    Just for the record, GMC and Chevy trucks combined were sold at a higher rate than Ford; on the order of 850,000 to 750,000 respectively. 

    The advantage that gets little press is that Apple has 271 retail stores throughout the U.S. These store provide a high level of service and support to iPhone owners, making even purchase at a carrier outlet a reasonable choice, should those services and support be required later at an Apple Store.

    Of course, Carriers love selling iPhones.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 11
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,746member
    rob53 said:
    Market share is not the whole story; to show an illegal monopoly, the DOJ will have to prove that Apple maintains that market share by coercion, market manipulation or price manipulation. If US consumers simply prefer iPhones by a 2 to 1 margin, that’s not illegal. The case, as filed, faces some real challenges.
    This happens in every market and rarely anything happens. Ford sells more trucks than any other company. Has the DOJ looked into any market manipulation by Ford? What about all their, and GM’s, manipulation of the truth? Even Microsoft just got off with a hand slap while they continue to coerce and manipulate the PC market. The US government is the largest user of Microsoft products, forcing everyone to use their server products with expensive client licenses yet nothing from the DOJ. 
    There is a huge issue you are ignoring. 

    Ford, or any other carmaker, is not making a device that you run your life through. You don't bank through your car. You don't shop through your car. You don't communicate through your car. You don't identify yourself through your car. Your car isn't on your person for long either. Your car isn't accumulating the same amount of data on you as your mobile devices. You don't use your car to create much. 

    The same cannot be said for mobile communications devices in general which are limited to very few platforms which also act as gatekeepers. 

    That changes everything and is precisely why these DoJ type cases have sprung up across the globe. 

    Marketshare itself isn't an issue and never was. How you manage your business with that marketshare, though, could very well put you under the spotlight. 

    That said, at some point, cars may well become part of generally widespread digital ecosystems and treated like them but that isn't the case today in general terms. 

  • Reply 11 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,745member
    Market share is not the whole story; to show an illegal monopoly, the DOJ will have to prove that Apple maintains that market share by coercion, market manipulation or price manipulation. If US consumers simply prefer iPhones by a 2 to 1 margin, that’s not illegal. The case, as filed, faces some real challenges.
    Exactly.
    watto_cobradanoxtmay
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