New Music & audio enhancements plus a mysterious 'Passthrough' feature are coming at WWDC

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,097member
    Some songs have dramatic endings hitting on a hard note, (eg, "Won't Get Fooled Again" by The Who) and shouldn't be merged with the beginning of other songs. And some songs have dramatic beginnings, (eg, "A Hard Day's Night" by the Beatles) and shouldn't be merged with the ending of other songs. I wonder if artists will sue Apple for modifying their music. I remember a story a few years back of big companies suing a small software company for creating software that bleeped out certain swear words in their movies. I don't recall who won that case.
    As this is a user-choice playback tool, Apple is not modifying anyone's music. They are merely giving users the option to do a crossfade. Also, the new feature is an enhancement of an existing user-choice crossfade feature which has resulted in no lawsuits. For that matter, if anyone was going to be prickly about a crossfade, you'd think they'd have already been apoplectic about the feature on Apple TV that lets the user strip out the vocals for playback so they can do karaoke.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 22 of 29
    melgross said:
    I always hated fadeouts on songs; seems like artists just couldn’t figure out how to end it. Maybe it’s due to chiefly listening to punk rock and thrash medal, but I shan’t use crossfade or Smart Song Transitions. 
    Ending a piece of music is almost as hard As writing the music itself. Even Beethoven had this problem, so it’s nothing new.
    I've written and recorded a few dozen punk songs, which is a bit of a different genre than Beethoven (as well as the genre I invented in my autocorrected post, "thrash medal") but ending songs is easy: play the last note/chord/measure, then stop. That's also how we did it when I played trombone in school(s) for nine years. Fades are antithetical with live music (save electronic stuff, I suppose) and therefore have always struck me as a studio gimmick overused back in the daze. But, you know, I'm just a codger who likes riding a guitar like a Harley through the desert.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 23 of 29
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    AppleZulu said:
    melgross said:
    With all of these fun niceties, there is really only one thing I care about. Classical Music on the Mac. It took them a long time to get it out for the iPad, which was a major advance. But the app doesn’t work in the Mac, though I haven’t tried to lately. I always thought this was because they were working on a real Mac version, but nothing so far. I don’t see the problem here. Does it really require an OS upgrade to get a new app? My 13” Macbook Pro is my music server, taking over from my ancient 15” Macbook Pro when it first came out. But the lack of a proper classical music app for it is really inexcusable.
    Yep, for Apple TV, too. I do get working the kinks out on iOS first before getting to Mac (and AppleTV). Classical music enthusiasts can be cantankerous and they’ve had to improvise their own catalog system forever, so anything Apple does will be “wrong” because it’s not whatever DIY convention each person has already set up, but it’s high time they bite the bullet and come out with it already. The iPhone and iPad apps are great, but classical music folks are probably more likely to have a decent listening room setup, and the classical app needs to be native on devices that are attached to amps and speakers. 
    Decent is the word. It’s in the six figures, as are many of my friend’s. Those that aren’t are generally somewhere in the five figures. We may not be in very large numbers, but we do get a lot of music.
  • Reply 24 of 29
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    melgross said:
    I always hated fadeouts on songs; seems like artists just couldn’t figure out how to end it. Maybe it’s due to chiefly listening to punk rock and thrash medal, but I shan’t use crossfade or Smart Song Transitions. 
    Ending a piece of music is almost as hard As writing the music itself. Even Beethoven had this problem, so it’s nothing new.
    I've written and recorded a few dozen punk songs, which is a bit of a different genre than Beethoven (as well as the genre I invented in my autocorrected post, "thrash medal") but ending songs is easy: play the last note/chord/measure, then stop. That's also how we did it when I played trombone in school(s) for nine years. Fades are antithetical with live music (save electronic stuff, I suppose) and therefore have always struck me as a studio gimmick overused back in the daze. But, you know, I'm just a codger who likes riding a guitar like a Harley through the desert.
    Kn,y some songs are ended that way. Many fade out. They just repeat the chorus until you can’t hear it anymore.
  • Reply 25 of 29
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 18,020member
    I’ll tell you what, I’ll forego every single one of those features if Apple can figure out how not to have the music app automatically start playing when I connect to my car’s Bluetooth. It doesn’t even matter if I quit the app first. It’s absolutely infuriating.  
    mattinozwilliamlondon
  • Reply 26 of 29
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,097member
    melgross said:
    AppleZulu said:
    melgross said:
    With all of these fun niceties, there is really only one thing I care about. Classical Music on the Mac. It took them a long time to get it out for the iPad, which was a major advance. But the app doesn’t work in the Mac, though I haven’t tried to lately. I always thought this was because they were working on a real Mac version, but nothing so far. I don’t see the problem here. Does it really require an OS upgrade to get a new app? My 13” Macbook Pro is my music server, taking over from my ancient 15” Macbook Pro when it first came out. But the lack of a proper classical music app for it is really inexcusable.
    Yep, for Apple TV, too. I do get working the kinks out on iOS first before getting to Mac (and AppleTV). Classical music enthusiasts can be cantankerous and they’ve had to improvise their own catalog system forever, so anything Apple does will be “wrong” because it’s not whatever DIY convention each person has already set up, but it’s high time they bite the bullet and come out with it already. The iPhone and iPad apps are great, but classical music folks are probably more likely to have a decent listening room setup, and the classical app needs to be native on devices that are attached to amps and speakers. 
    Decent is the word. It’s in the six figures, as are many of my friend’s. Those that aren’t are generally somewhere in the five figures. We may not be in very large numbers, but we do get a lot of music.
    You know once you get above five figures, you can't really hear the difference.
  • Reply 27 of 29
    Pass-through is merely what the app ‘Loopback’ does which is to provide a user interface to route audio internally between apps. The kids use it to let OBS Studio “listen” to the output of say, Logic Pro when live-streaming. Apple does the equivalent of this for midi with their included midi setup application on every mac. If they’d announced this during the pandemic it would have been huge news. Probably when they started working on it. Disclaimer - of course I also have no idea what the new feature will actually do :-)
  • Reply 28 of 29
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    AppleZulu said:
    melgross said:
    AppleZulu said:
    melgross said:
    With all of these fun niceties, there is really only one thing I care about. Classical Music on the Mac. It took them a long time to get it out for the iPad, which was a major advance. But the app doesn’t work in the Mac, though I haven’t tried to lately. I always thought this was because they were working on a real Mac version, but nothing so far. I don’t see the problem here. Does it really require an OS upgrade to get a new app? My 13” Macbook Pro is my music server, taking over from my ancient 15” Macbook Pro when it first came out. But the lack of a proper classical music app for it is really inexcusable.
    Yep, for Apple TV, too. I do get working the kinks out on iOS first before getting to Mac (and AppleTV). Classical music enthusiasts can be cantankerous and they’ve had to improvise their own catalog system forever, so anything Apple does will be “wrong” because it’s not whatever DIY convention each person has already set up, but it’s high time they bite the bullet and come out with it already. The iPhone and iPad apps are great, but classical music folks are probably more likely to have a decent listening room setup, and the classical app needs to be native on devices that are attached to amps and speakers. 
    Decent is the word. It’s in the six figures, as are many of my friend’s. Those that aren’t are generally somewhere in the five figures. We may not be in very large numbers, but we do get a lot of music.
    You know once you get above five figures, you can't really hear the difference.
    Yeah, depends. I’ve got a lot of equipment though. That’s one reason for how much it costs.
  • Reply 29 of 29
    PeetiePeetie Posts: 1member

    mysterious 'Passthrough' feature are coming at WWDC


    I heave see nothing on the WWDC, not in the keynote not in the news
    does someone knows what was or is going one regarding this issue?
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