M4 Macs, iPhone 16, and more: What Apple has planned for the rest of 2024

Posted:
in iPhone edited June 17

Apple's WWDC is only a prelude to the rest of the year. Beyond the iPhone 16, there's a lot still coming in 2024 from Apple. Here's what to expect, and when.

Man in dark shirt stands in front of a monitor, surrounded by a smartphone, computer, and headphones with a colorful background.
Many Apple product launches are expected by the end of 2024.



Apple is a company that likes to keep things running to a schedule. The company's calendar often features events and product launches at the same times throughout the year.

The conclusion of WWDC marks the mid-point of Apple's schedule for the year. As usual for Apple, the latter half is more fiscally important to the company, with the iPhone being a major factor to its finances.

Here's what you need to know about the last six months of 2024, and what Apple is expected to launch.

September, October



After the summer celebration of developers, Apple's main concern when it comes to scheduling is its fall event lineup.

Apple doesn't tend to hold media events in July and August. Indeed, the last time it did so was August 2007, when it launched its first aluminum iMacs.

September event is very well known, even to those who don't follow Apple closely. This is because it's the launch period for Apple's iPhone update.

Usually, the event is held in the first half of the month, and often isn't just about the iPhone. The September event has also become the venue for many other product launches, which it hopes to sell during the holiday season.

This covers pretty much all of Apple's consumer product catalog. Aside from iPhones, there's often a good chance, but no guarantee, that other things will be revealed during the presentation.

Man standing under large, colorful rainbow sculpture on bright green grass, with a modern building and clear blue sky in the background.
Apple's fall events are presented at Apple Park by its executives, including Tim Cook.



Apple has also gotten into the habit of holding multiple events in the fall, with an October event often following after September. It doesn't happen every year, as it was missed in 2022, 2019, 2017, and 2015 over the last decade.

The October event can usually be considered the "overflow" for the September event. Apple can choose to bump products into October if the September event has too many, or if there are production reasons for a delay.

Apple isn't beholden to just one or two events, either. For example, a third fall event occurred in November 2020, introducing its first Apple Silicon Mac models.

Then again, Apple's production was severely disrupted by the pandemic at the time, leading it to wait until October to launch its iPhone 12 updates.

While Apple is known for holding events, it doesn't necessarily have to do it for all products. For major launches, like iPhones, it's almost guaranteed, but not for everything.

If it's another product category and the changes made are slight, such as a spec-bump update to a MacBook Pro for example, it may just issue press releases about the change.

All we can safely say is that Apple will be launching iPhones this fall with a media event. For everything else, they have a good chance of being unveiled, but how and when is up to debate.

iPhone 16



Apple's September event is almost certain to be dominated by iPhone 16 news, with introductions of both the iPhone 16 and iPhone 16 Pro lines.

So far, it seems that the launch of the new models is on track for a September launch. Short of another global catastrophe, it's a pretty bankable launch.

Two smartphones with prominent camera arrays and Apple logos, one showing the back and the other angled to display side buttons, set against a blue, textured background.
A render of what the iPhone 16 Pro could look like



The main changes to the product family will cover a few key areas, but AI is probably going to be the most important. This is demonstrated by the reaction to the introduction of Apple Intelligence during WWDC.

Other changes include the Pro lineup getting the A18 chip, display size increases, new buttons on the Pro models, and even the use of new battery technologies.

iPad



Apple didn't make any material iPad updates in 2023, which means 2024 is likely to be filled with iPad announcements. So far, that has consisted of new iPad Pro models with M4 and the M2 iPad Air, and a new Apple Pencil Pro.

That said, there's still the prospect of changes to the remaining models in the iPad range before the year is out.

Hands use a stylus to draw on a tablet displaying colorful city street art with traffic lights and signs.
The iPad Pro was updated with M4 and Tandem OLED in 2024.



The base model iPad and the iPad mini could get chip updates at least, making them more powerful and able to offer Apple Intelligence features. However there are few rumors about the models and their potential features.

That said, it's been rumored that an OLED iPad mini may not arrive until well beyond 2024. You may end up waiting until 2026 for a new iPad mini.

The rumor mill has also repeatedly raised the prospect of a foldable iPad. Some rumors have also floated the idea of a launch by the end of 2024 or early 2025.

There have also been proposals of the folding iPad arriving by 2026.

Mac and MacBook



Apple's Mac-specific launches for 2024 have so far consisted of an update to the MacBook Air in March. That naturally means there's the prospect of lots of new Mac hardware on the horizon.

With iPad Pro now using M4, it also means there's a good chance of earlier than expected upgrades across the product catalog.

Apple last updated the Mac mini in January 2023 with the M2 and M2 Pro. This makes it a prime candidate for an upgrade toward the end of 2024.

A MacBook Pro on a wooden table displays a colorful screen with the Apple M4 logo, in a cozy living room setting.
The MacBook Pro line stand a chance of an M4 update by the end of the year.



It's a somewhat similar story for the Mac Studio and Mac Pro, as they were given M2 Max and M2 Ultra chips in June 2023. However, speculation claims Apple will skip 2024 in favor of a 2025 update instead.

In November 2023, Apple updated the iMac with M3 as well as the MacBook Pro range. Given Apple updated the MacBook Pro 10 months after the shift to M2, a year's gap is entirely possible for the company.

However, according to Mark Gurman in April, the chance of MacBook Pro models with M4 by the end of 2024 is slim and could be pushed into early 2025 instead.

Apple Watch



The Apple Watch has enjoyed an update in the fall for the last eight years, often at the same time as the iPhone itself. This is a trend Apple is very likely to continue doing for some time.

A person wearing a smartwatch with a green band, displaying multiple data complications and the date.
Apple Watch Ultra



For 2024, the Apple Watch Series 10 is expected to be more powerful, with a larger display and a thinner overall body.

There is also a chance of an update to the Apple Watch Ultra, though there are questions about whether it will arrive at all.

HomePod and AirPod



The HomePod and AirPod product families are oddities for Apple, since they don't necessarily warrant an all-out launch on their own. Instead, you would expect them to be tacked on with other launches.

This is especially true for AirPods, which can serve as accessories for the iPhone and can benefit from a simultaneous late-in-year update.

White over-ear headphones with cushioned ear pads and a padded headband, lying on a textured gray surface.
AirPods Max may finally get an update in 2024 if we're lucky.



Analysts have already put forward that updates to the AirPods and AirPods Max lines will happen late in 2024. This obviously lines up with Apple's usual fall updates.

Expected updates include improved fits for the entry-level and mid-tier AirPods, as well as the possibility of USB-C charging cases and Find My speakers. For AirPods Max, it's likely to include USB-C instead of a Lightning connection at a minimum.

For the HomePod and HomePod mini, there have been rumors of a display-enabled version, but a touchscreen-enabled version probably won't happen in 2024 itself.

The HomePod mini was launched in November 2020, making it close to four years without a considerable update. The first HomePod generation came out in February 2018, but after a 2021 discontinuation, a second-gen model appeared in February 2023.

We don't know if HomePod will get an update soon, but it's been a while since there was significant action for either model. Apple could surprise everyone with a fall update, but the lack of rumors about it speaks volumes.



Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,638member
    Implementing AI on the HomePod may require less RAM than AI on a laptop, since it's mostly limited to processing audio.
    gregoriusmAlex1N9secondkox2watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    nubusnubus Posts: 480member
    The main event in H2 is not on new features. With USB-C being mandatory in EU at end-of-year and in India from March 2025 now is the time for Apple to clear sales channels. iPhone 12, 13, and 14 will have to go. iPad mini, keyboards, mice, iPhone SE will all need upgrades or to be discontinued. iMac M3 will need an upgrade or new packaging due to current bundles having old keyboards and mice.

    Will Apple introduce A17 using 3nm for iPhone 16 and A18 Pro for iPhone 17? Both with 8 GB to support AI. And iPad 10th gen... it could be kept with iPhone 15 as the only USB-C devices not capable of AI or Apple could give it an 8 GB A17. And how will Apple solve the problem when moving from 12, 13, 14, SE, 15, 15 Pro to just 15, 16, 16 Pro. Apple won't be able to deliver on all price points needed in India or EU with only 3 lines. Introduce a 14c, dump the price of 15, add SE 4th gen, or a combination?

    And will Apple finally give us a bit more memory and storage? I'm looking forward to H2!
    Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    mpantonempantone Posts: 2,104member
    Implementing AI on the HomePod may require less RAM than AI on a laptop, since it's mostly limited to processing audio.
    Clearly Apple has the engineering expertise to stick Apple Silicon and other required hardware to support Apple Intelligence on HomePod. The problem is whether or not the additional cost is worth it. Naturally the extra cost would be passed off to the consumer and HomePod isn't exactly the cheapest device in this product category.

    Remember that HomePod like Apple TV mostly does nothing during media playback. So if you interact with your HomePod once or twice an hour, that's really a wasted resource.

    My guess is that Apple will eventually try to run HomePod's AI computations on nearby hardware (like a Mac or maybe an iPad Pro) that's paired to the speaker. That would be a more efficient allocation of computing resources rather than sticking a high-specced Apple Silicon SoC and 6GB+ of RAM in a device that doesn't need it 99% of the time.

    It's probably a similar situation with the Apple TV set-top box. We already have seen that Apple has balked at turning it into the a full fledged videogame console due to the large NAND storage requirements of today's AAA videogame titles (which are easily require 50-100GB or more in storage space). As a set-top video streamer, it doesn't need much more than a couple of gigabytes for the OS and a media content buffer.

    Again AI would be handled by a local Mac.

    At some point when the silicon is cheaper and the AI models are more efficient, it may make more sense to bring them locally to HomePod and Apple TV but my guess is we are 4-5 years away from that. Neither device is a big revenue driver at the moment, so clearly Apple has not made it a top priority. I think they will remain on the back burner for a while.

    One thing we do know is that Apple will not eat the increased costs themselves and take a lower gross margin on HomePod and Apple TV.
    edited June 17 muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    michelb76michelb76 Posts: 659member
    Tricky. Seems like it's best to skip this generation unless you really need the upgrade, and wait for fall 2025, as most of the AI stuff won't be fully ready until well into 2025.
    Oferwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 11
    HomePod upgrade path for AI is sorely needed as Siri for HomePod is just awful at this stage. I have observed a deterioration over the past updates of OS or maybe the HomePod 2's have worse microphones. Frustrating part is that there are no diagnostics mechanisms that easily enable a customer to understand why there are challenges.

    HomePod compute will likely follow Apple Watch Ultra 3 SoC upgrade to build volume for the SoC. The mini may not benefit in the same way unless as previous commentators have mentioned that AI on HomePod can be more lightweight due to fewer use cases needed support.

    Ideally Apple will want to do a platform play and invest to also kick Alexa in the teeth. The Echo Dots of this world would then be painfully obsolete. If Apple can do a software only upgrade of AI capability through some magic then they will win the internet. There is a slight chance they can make it happen as current Siri models have a larger proportion of on device processing.

    As a minimum a software only upgrade of Siri will defer more back to the Private Cloud Compute again to lean in on larger models for the older HomePods and then a new series HomePod 3 will be fully on device. I would revert back to the extra latency again for proper fidelity Siri on older devices rather than the current issues.
    edited June 18 williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,538member


    Ideally Apple will want to do a platform play and invest to also kick Alexa in the teeth. The Echo Dots of this world would then be painfully obsolete. If Apple can do a software only upgrade of AI capability through some magic then they will win the internet. There is a slight chance they can make it happen as current Siri models have a larger proportion of on device processing.

    The Echo Dots are sub $50 USD devices that get heavily discounted during Amazon’s sales events. I don’t see Apple targeting anything in that price range and sales volume. They are ubiquitous, cheap, work well, have voice recognition that puts Siri to shame, and could probably be sold in the checkout line in grocery stores. I use mine for turning on/off smart lights and smart plugs, in-house intercom, getting weather updates, setting alarms and timers, monitoring interior temperature, and automation. None of these things require more horsepower than what’s already in them. Some of the other more advanced capabilities of the Echo Dot, including integration with alarm systems using sound recognition, serving as mesh points on certain brand WiFi systems, and in the larger models, halfway decent audio playback.

    Even the cheapest and oldest Dots are more than enough for listening to radio quality music, sports broadcasts, talk shows, podcasts, etc., especially while working in the garage or shed. I wouldn’t dare put an HomePod in my garage due to living in a fairly challenging 4-season climate with snow, rain, cold, high humidity, and dust always present, regardless of the much higher price and lower functionality of Apple’s smart speakers.  Even older Echo Dot models have been updated to support Thread and Matter. How many older Apple devices are being backfitted with Thread and Matter support? 

    There’s no doubt that a 20-ton excavator would kick in the teeth of a hand shovel. But what’s the point? The Echo Dot and pretty much every current Echo device is way too low of a bar for Apple to aim for. Apple also needs to figure out how to monetize AI on some of these devices. Unlike Amazon, Apple has far more options available to take advantage of, like its customer centric ecosystem. Apple has clearly set its targets appropriately and is executing on a plan that is at least a decade in process. 
    edited June 18 muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Hi Dewme,

    I see your points and my points were not articulated well.

    Amazon seems to be abandoning Alexa and giving up on the ecosystem since it was an initial loss leader for a way to shop with Amazon that never appeared. Amazon will not continue to subsidize the Alexa ecosystem forever.

    the current use cases for both Siri and Alexa merely scratches the surface of what voice based computing can offer. Children in particular love having conversations and learning. People with vision impairment benefit from HomePods a lot.

    i didn’t mean for apple to aim for the price point of the cheap echo dots, I meant for apple to lean in on device local ai above and beyond what Alexa and current Siri are capable of.

    As home automation becomes ever more intrusive in our lives then apples privacy ethos is a great selling point. Amazon is terrible.

    the cost and price point will be determined by the capabilities of the next Apple Watch Ultra soc.



    dewme said:


    Ideally Apple will want to do a platform play and invest to also kick Alexa in the teeth. The Echo Dots of this world would then be painfully obsolete. If Apple can do a software only upgrade of AI capability through some magic then they will win the internet. There is a slight chance they can make it happen as current Siri models have a larger proportion of on device processing.

    The Echo Dots are sub $50 USD devices that get heavily discounted during Amazon’s sales events. I don’t see Apple targeting anything in that price range and sales volume. They are ubiquitous, cheap, work well, have voice recognition that puts Siri to shame, and could probably be sold in the checkout line in grocery stores. I use mine for turning on/off smart lights and smart plugs, in-house intercom, getting weather updates, setting alarms and timers, monitoring interior temperature, and automation. None of these things require more horsepower than what’s already in them. Some of the other more advanced capabilities of the Echo Dot, including integration with alarm systems using sound recognition, serving as mesh points on certain brand WiFi systems, and in the larger models, halfway decent audio playback.

    Even the cheapest and oldest Dots are more than enough for listening to radio quality music, sports broadcasts, talk shows, podcasts, etc., especially while working in the garage or shed. I wouldn’t dare put an HomePod in my garage due to living in a fairly challenging 4-season climate with snow, rain, cold, high humidity, and dust always present, regardless of the much higher price and lower functionality of Apple’s smart speakers.  Even older Echo Dot models have been updated to support Thread and Matter. How many older Apple devices are being backfitted with Thread and Matter support? 

    There’s no doubt that a 20-ton excavator would kick in the teeth of a hand shovel. But what’s the point? The Echo Dot and pretty much every current Echo device is way too low of a bar for Apple to aim for. Apple also needs to figure out how to monetize AI on some of these devices. Unlike Amazon, Apple has far more options available to take advantage of, like its customer centric ecosystem. Apple has clearly set its targets appropriately and is executing on a plan that is at least a decade in process. 

    williamlondondewmeAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 11
    Hi Dewme,

    I see your points and my points were not articulated well.

    Amazon seems to be abandoning Alexa and giving up on the ecosystem since it was an initial loss leader for a way to shop with Amazon that never appeared. Amazon will not continue to subsidize the Alexa ecosystem forever.

    the current use cases for both Siri and Alexa merely scratches the surface of what voice based computing can offer. Children in particular love having conversations and learning. People with vision impairment benefit from HomePods a lot.

    i didn’t mean for apple to aim for the price point of the cheap echo dots, I meant for apple to lean in on device local ai above and beyond what Alexa and current Siri are capable of.

    As home automation becomes ever more intrusive in our lives then apples privacy ethos is a great selling point. Amazon is terrible.

    the cost and price point will be determined by the capabilities of the next Apple Watch Ultra soc.



    dewme said:


    Ideally Apple will want to do a platform play and invest to also kick Alexa in the teeth. The Echo Dots of this world would then be painfully obsolete. If Apple can do a software only upgrade of AI capability through some magic then they will win the internet. There is a slight chance they can make it happen as current Siri models have a larger proportion of on device processing.

    The Echo Dots are sub $50 USD devices that get heavily discounted during Amazon’s sales events. I don’t see Apple targeting anything in that price range and sales volume. They are ubiquitous, cheap, work well, have voice recognition that puts Siri to shame, and could probably be sold in the checkout line in grocery stores. I use mine for turning on/off smart lights and smart plugs, in-house intercom, getting weather updates, setting alarms and timers, monitoring interior temperature, and automation. None of these things require more horsepower than what’s already in them. Some of the other more advanced capabilities of the Echo Dot, including integration with alarm systems using sound recognition, serving as mesh points on certain brand WiFi systems, and in the larger models, halfway decent audio playback.

    Even the cheapest and oldest Dots are more than enough for listening to radio quality music, sports broadcasts, talk shows, podcasts, etc., especially while working in the garage or shed. I wouldn’t dare put an HomePod in my garage due to living in a fairly challenging 4-season climate with snow, rain, cold, high humidity, and dust always present, regardless of the much higher price and lower functionality of Apple’s smart speakers.  Even older Echo Dot models have been updated to support Thread and Matter. How many older Apple devices are being backfitted with Thread and Matter support? 

    There’s no doubt that a 20-ton excavator would kick in the teeth of a hand shovel. But what’s the point? The Echo Dot and pretty much every current Echo device is way too low of a bar for Apple to aim for. Apple also needs to figure out how to monetize AI on some of these devices. Unlike Amazon, Apple has far more options available to take advantage of, like its customer centric ecosystem. Apple has clearly set its targets appropriately and is executing on a plan that is at least a decade in process. 

    Obviously, the Echo Dots rely on server based processing to provide what voice capabilities they have. One possible solution for the HomePods and Apple TVs would be to give the customer the ability to opt-in to Apple's Private Cloud in a manner similar to what is being proposed for access to ChatGPT when a request exceeds Apple Intelligence on-device capability.
    williamlondonAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,538member
    Hi Dewme,

    I see your points and my points were not articulated well.

    Amazon seems to be abandoning Alexa and giving up on the ecosystem since it was an initial loss leader for a way to shop with Amazon that never appeared. Amazon will not continue to subsidize the Alexa ecosystem forever.

    the current use cases for both Siri and Alexa merely scratches the surface of what voice based computing can offer. Children in particular love having conversations and learning. People with vision impairment benefit from HomePods a lot.

    i didn’t mean for apple to aim for the price point of the cheap echo dots, I meant for apple to lean in on device local ai above and beyond what Alexa and current Siri are capable of.

    As home automation becomes ever more intrusive in our lives then apples privacy ethos is a great selling point. Amazon is terrible.

    the cost and price point will be determined by the capabilities of the next Apple Watch Ultra soc.



    dewme said:


    Ideally Apple will want to do a platform play and invest to also kick Alexa in the teeth. The Echo Dots of this world would then be painfully obsolete. If Apple can do a software only upgrade of AI capability through some magic then they will win the internet. There is a slight chance they can make it happen as current Siri models have a larger proportion of on device processing.

    The Echo Dots are sub $50 USD devices that get heavily discounted during Amazon’s sales events. I don’t see Apple targeting anything in that price range and sales volume. They are ubiquitous, cheap, work well, have voice recognition that puts Siri to shame, and could probably be sold in the checkout line in grocery stores. I use mine for turning on/off smart lights and smart plugs, in-house intercom, getting weather updates, setting alarms and timers, monitoring interior temperature, and automation. None of these things require more horsepower than what’s already in them. Some of the other more advanced capabilities of the Echo Dot, including integration with alarm systems using sound recognition, serving as mesh points on certain brand WiFi systems, and in the larger models, halfway decent audio playback.

    Even the cheapest and oldest Dots are more than enough for listening to radio quality music, sports broadcasts, talk shows, podcasts, etc., especially while working in the garage or shed. I wouldn’t dare put an HomePod in my garage due to living in a fairly challenging 4-season climate with snow, rain, cold, high humidity, and dust always present, regardless of the much higher price and lower functionality of Apple’s smart speakers.  Even older Echo Dot models have been updated to support Thread and Matter. How many older Apple devices are being backfitted with Thread and Matter support? 

    There’s no doubt that a 20-ton excavator would kick in the teeth of a hand shovel. But what’s the point? The Echo Dot and pretty much every current Echo device is way too low of a bar for Apple to aim for. Apple also needs to figure out how to monetize AI on some of these devices. Unlike Amazon, Apple has far more options available to take advantage of, like its customer centric ecosystem. Apple has clearly set its targets appropriately and is executing on a plan that is at least a decade in process. 

    Thanks for the replay. We're on the same page. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 11
    Yeah agreed and this is the clincher.. providing above as-is experience will cost a tonne in inference and thus Amazon may bow out as cannot see the business case. Apple on the other hand as a you and I mentioned can do PCC based queries for old HomePods and either go augmented local SoC for better experience or remain full cloud. The trend is that Apple will favour on device LLMs as CapEx is borne by the customer and given the likely SoC evolution of Apple Watch then future HomePods may have a strong local slim LLM processing capability in addition to PCC offloading.

    It does not seem to be too expensive to add the beefed up NPU to the next SoC for AW and HomePods to deliver 38+ TOPS locally. HomePod AI edition for the win.

    In summary Apple's AI roll out is super smart, business aligned and CapEx light. I am a huge fan of the HomePod format of compute and I really home Apple doubles down on its value prop.

    roundaboutnow said:
    Hi Dewme,

    I see your points and my points were not articulated well.

    Amazon seems to be abandoning Alexa and giving up on the ecosystem since it was an initial loss leader for a way to shop with Amazon that never appeared. Amazon will not continue to subsidize the Alexa ecosystem forever.

    the current use cases for both Siri and Alexa merely scratches the surface of what voice based computing can offer. Children in particular love having conversations and learning. People with vision impairment benefit from HomePods a lot.

    i didn’t mean for apple to aim for the price point of the cheap echo dots, I meant for apple to lean in on device local ai above and beyond what Alexa and current Siri are capable of.

    As home automation becomes ever more intrusive in our lives then apples privacy ethos is a great selling point. Amazon is terrible.

    the cost and price point will be determined by the capabilities of the next Apple Watch Ultra soc.



    dewme said:


    Ideally Apple will want to do a platform play and invest to also kick Alexa in the teeth. The Echo Dots of this world would then be painfully obsolete. If Apple can do a software only upgrade of AI capability through some magic then they will win the internet. There is a slight chance they can make it happen as current Siri models have a larger proportion of on device processing.

    The Echo Dots are sub $50 USD devices that get heavily discounted during Amazon’s sales events. I don’t see Apple targeting anything in that price range and sales volume. They are ubiquitous, cheap, work well, have voice recognition that puts Siri to shame, and could probably be sold in the checkout line in grocery stores. I use mine for turning on/off smart lights and smart plugs, in-house intercom, getting weather updates, setting alarms and timers, monitoring interior temperature, and automation. None of these things require more horsepower than what’s already in them. Some of the other more advanced capabilities of the Echo Dot, including integration with alarm systems using sound recognition, serving as mesh points on certain brand WiFi systems, and in the larger models, halfway decent audio playback.

    Even the cheapest and oldest Dots are more than enough for listening to radio quality music, sports broadcasts, talk shows, podcasts, etc., especially while working in the garage or shed. I wouldn’t dare put an HomePod in my garage due to living in a fairly challenging 4-season climate with snow, rain, cold, high humidity, and dust always present, regardless of the much higher price and lower functionality of Apple’s smart speakers.  Even older Echo Dot models have been updated to support Thread and Matter. How many older Apple devices are being backfitted with Thread and Matter support? 

    There’s no doubt that a 20-ton excavator would kick in the teeth of a hand shovel. But what’s the point? The Echo Dot and pretty much every current Echo device is way too low of a bar for Apple to aim for. Apple also needs to figure out how to monetize AI on some of these devices. Unlike Amazon, Apple has far more options available to take advantage of, like its customer centric ecosystem. Apple has clearly set its targets appropriately and is executing on a plan that is at least a decade in process. 

    Obviously, the Echo Dots rely on server based processing to provide what voice capabilities they have. One possible solution for the HomePods and Apple TVs would be to give the customer the ability to opt-in to Apple's Private Cloud in a manner similar to what is being proposed for access to ChatGPT when a request exceeds Apple Intelligence on-device capability.

    Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 11
    jellyapplejellyapple Posts: 116member
    Expectation? wait till 2027.
Sign In or Register to comment.