Apple Watch Series 10 - All the screen, size, and band rumors

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited July 6

The Apple Watch Series 10 is expected to arrive with some big changes. This is what the rumor mill thinks is on the way.

Smartwatch with a white band and analog display floats with blurred background featuring a guitar and colorful objects.
A render of what the Apple Watch series 10 could look like



The Apple Watch has been a mainstay over the years, getting an update like clockwork every fall for most of its life. But at the same time, there's not been any major changes to the fairly static design of the smartwatch.

Much like the iPhone X's major design changes, Apple has been rumored to use the tenth series of Apple Watch to introduce big alterations to its wearable. Rumors and speculation from commentators insist something special is on the way.



Here is what has surfaced about the next Apple Watch release so far.

A probable major Apple Watch X redesign for 2024



Referred to as the "Apple Watch X" instead of the Apple Watch Series 10, it was said in August 2023 that the new release would launch sometime in 2024 and 2025, to mark the momentous number.

Smartwatch with a white band displaying time, heart rate, caloric burn, pace, and distance. Background features colorful abstract shapes.
Depending on the rumor, the Apple Watch Series 10 could be thicker or thinner.



The refresh would include a number of key changes, rather than be a more incremental change as usually observed.

One of these changes is said in the report to relate to how you connect bands to the Apple Watch at all. The use of a magnetic system is proposed, which could help reduce the space used by the existing slot-based mechanism.

It was also offered in speculation that there would be a thinner overall design for the device.

At this point, the rumors about a radical redesign don't seem likely. Everything so far points towards Apple continuing the same sort of design but with significant tweaks, rather than sweeping changes.

If other rumors and renders are to be believed, it's still going to be a square-ish design with a rounded display just like its predecessors. No off-the-wall changes like a circular display are anticipated so far.

More likely is the thinner design -- but it's not going to be hugely thinner.

Apple Watch Series 10 may not work with older bands



Continuing the band sentiment, a leaker said in December that the "connectors of next-generation of Apple Watch has completely designed." It was also claimed that old bands wouldn't work with the new Apple Watch.

The leaker also insisted that the leak was "100% accurate," which doesn't instill confidence.

Smartwatch with a white band, displaying a green charging icon with a lightning bolt, placed on a wooden surface.
The mechanism for Apple Watch bands could change with the Series 10



The leaker didn't go into any further details on the claim and didn't offer sources. However, their previously spotty accuracy did include a correct claim about FineWoven bands pre-launch.

Add in the earlier band claim, and it seems quite plausible that something will happen to band fixings.

As to how this so-claimed magnetic band system could function, there's no obvious explanation for how it will function.

Apple has looked into using magnets in new ways with its Apple Watch bands in patents, such as one that turns into a protective case. In one filing from 2021, Apple offered more than 50 drawings explaining ways magnets could be used to securely engage with each other.

Apple Watch Series 10 may sip power thanks to a better display



The Apple Watch already has systems in place to minimize battery usage. Its low power consumption and adjustable refresh rate enables the display to be always on for the user.

Even beyond that, there's even the Low Power mode, which reduces usage to the essential elements.

In April 2024, it was reported that Apple will update the display again, to make it even more power-efficient. The report said it would use a new low-temperature polycrystalline oxide (LTPO) thin-film transistor (TFT) technology in the OLED display.

LTPO-TFT is already in use in the Apple Watch display, but only to some switching TFTs within the panel. Meanwhile, older LTPS is also being used for other switching TFTs and driving TFTs.

Under the new display, LTPO will be used on more TFTs, including the driving TFTs. LTPS will still be used, but only on any remaining TFTs and circuits outside the viewable pixel area.

Apple Watch Series 10 may be thinner and larger, or possibly thicker



In a pair of reports from June, Apple will be making its Apple Watch thinner, following the trend promoted by the iPad Pro refresh.

It was offered that the Apple Watch will be made thinner since Apple is starting a new class of hardware that aims to be the "thinnest and lightest" in their categories.

To a point, Apple has been doing the whole thin-and-light motif for years. This may be a bigger push to go even thinner and lighter than ever before.

Smartwatch with a white band, gold case, and exposed sensors, against a blurred colorful background.
The rear of the Apple Watch Series 10 will continue to have the sensor array.



In June, an analyst offered that the major redesign of the Apple Watch will be not only thinner, but larger.

Existing Apple Watch sizes start at 41mm and grow to 45mm. For the Series 10, it's proposed the starting point would be 45mm, with the larger size being 49mm.

Testing of 3D-printed components has reportedly gone well, and could impact future iterations of the Apple Watch.

The Apple Watch X screen could be bigger than an Apple Watch Ultra



In late June, the traditional leaking of CAD designs and renders occurred. These give an idea of what the new models could be like, thanks to a 3D image.

The renders released on June 26 look fairly familiar to those who already use an Apple Watch. However, the display is much larger on the render than normal, with the chassis being only marginally bigger than the Series 9.

Smartwatch with a white display, gold case, beige strap, showing a minimalist clock face with a yellow cartoon bird near the center.
You may find the Apple Watch Series 10 has a larger screen than the Series 9.



This would give the appearance of a larger display with thinner bezels. That screen would be 50.8mm, just bigger than the 49mm Apple Watch Ultra.

The renders also pushed back on other rumors that the Apple Watch Series X would be thinner. In the CAD image, the thickness is 11.6mm, north of the Series 9's 10.7mm and below the Ultra's 14.4mm.

A change of around a millimeter may not seem like that much, and it really isn't in most cases. But, for an item that's worn on your wrist every day, every dimension change counts.

While a thicker unit may not be the best result for the Apple Watch Series 10 or Series X, it would at least provide more space internally for other components. Even a few extra millimeters of space could translate into a bigger battery cell, further improving battery life durations.

More time on the wrist is always good for a timepiece. For the next Apple Watch, whether it accomplishes it by having more physical battery or being smart about its usage, it'll certainly be a beneficial change if it actually comes true.



Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 939member
    Apple has already given fans of bigger, bulkier watch cases the Ultra. I happen to love mine but, anecdotally speaking, based on how many Ultras I come across in the wild, it's not exactly setting the world on fire in sales. And Ultra--at least compared to usual pricing in Apple-world--is actually a value for what you get. Virtually all the pre-release rumors had it priced at $1,000 and up, so the $799 list was a pleasant surprise, plus it has been very routinely discounted on Amazon. All this to say that I don't believe for a second that Apple is going to thicken or upsize the cases on the regular Apple Watch lineup. What seems plausible and even probable is that the screens will get bigger via bezel reduction but remain in essentially the same size cases. I would love to see a Watch X debut similar to iPhone X, a big leap forward next gen product that the rumor mill never saw coming. It would be fun and exciting to have a new Apple product that arrives as a complete surprise, but that kind of event is nearly extinct. (Apple almost surprised with the leap over M3 to M4 in the new iPad Pro, but even that leaked close to release.)
    Alex1N
  • Reply 2 of 11
    michelb76michelb76 Posts: 658member
    Really hope they finally improve the solo band quality so it doesn't tear that easily.
    williamlondonpulseimages
  • Reply 3 of 11
    Is it possible that the Ultra, or a watch with its size and features, will in effect become the larger size X and the features will also be added to the smaller one and the Ultra discontinued, or just kept as a feature-equivalent more rugged version? 
  • Reply 4 of 11
    multimediamultimedia Posts: 1,043member
    2” screen without the BULKY Ultra case is just what I’m looking for. Going from a Gold Aluminum Series 6, I’ll definitely be buying a light gold 2” Series X.
    edited July 6
  • Reply 5 of 11
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 939member
    Is it possible that the Ultra, or a watch with its size and features, will in effect become the larger size X and the features will also be added to the smaller one and the Ultra discontinued, or just kept as a feature-equivalent more rugged version? 
    All the rumor sources seem to agree that we're getting an Ultra 3 with no change in design--perhaps a black Ti model--but with whatever performance/feature upgrades the rest of the Watch line gets. I do wonder if Apple might introduce a third size to the regular Watch lineup, an "XL" version, with a case that's the same diagonal size as the Uttra, but otherwise retains the same thickness and design of the regular Apple Watch. There's a big market for big watches--I'm just not sure if an XL Watch would attract new buyers and be additive to sales or simply divide the buyers who currently buy the large Apple Watch. The Ultra at least targeted the Garmin, etc. adventure watch market which Apple wasn't serving at all before the Ultra. 
  • Reply 6 of 11
    CheeseFreezeCheeseFreeze Posts: 1,297member
    So basically the article states it could be bigger, thinner or thicker with a different screen and/or with a sketchy magnetic connection. Ok.
    Anilu_777williamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Anilu_777Anilu_777 Posts: 558member
    I have a fully functional Series 6 and 31 watch bands, some dating back to the Series 2, which are irreplaceable. If the current watch bands won’t fit I’m keeping the 6 until it literally dies. 
    williamlondonbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 8 of 11
    multimediamultimedia Posts: 1,043member
    Anilu_777 said:
    I have a fully functional Series 6 and 31 watch bands, some dating back to the Series 2, which are irreplaceable. If the current watch bands won’t fit I’m keeping the 6 until it literally dies. 
    I too have a lot of bands with my Gold Series 6. But the latest rumors say old bands will still work with the 2” Series X. So I plan to make the switch because I will never wear a GIGANTIC Ultra.
  • Reply 9 of 11
    saareksaarek Posts: 1,548member
    Personally I'd much prefer better battery life and more features over Apple's obsession with making everything "unbelievably thin". I'd hoped the cult of thinness had died off with Jony Ive leaving the company.
    edited July 8
  • Reply 10 of 11
    saareksaarek Posts: 1,548member
    Anilu_777 said:
    I have a fully functional Series 6 and 31 watch bands, some dating back to the Series 2, which are irreplaceable. If the current watch bands won’t fit I’m keeping the 6 until it literally dies. 

    31 watchbands? I'm genuinely intrigued now, what on earth made you buy so many?
  • Reply 11 of 11
    saarek said:
    Personally I'd much prefer better battery life and more features over Apple's obsession with making everything "unbelievably thin". I'd hoped the cult of thinness had died off with Jony Ive leaving the company.

    The only reason Apple increases battery life at this point is to expand the power budget for additional features, which nets either zero or only slight increase in actual device usage time.
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