Apple notebook lineup

thttht
Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
To alleviate the FH doldrums, I got on my CEO armchair and dreamed up this notebook lineup for Q4 2004 or thereabouts:



Code:




Clock L3 Vid LCD Screen Thick

Rate Cache Main Memory Mem Size Resolu ness Price

(GHz) (MB) (MB) (MB) (in) tion (in) (USD)

---- ---- -------------- --- ---- --------- ---- -----

iBook G4 0.87 none 128 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 799

iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 999

iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 14.1 1024x768 1.35 1199

iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 14.1 1152x864 1.35 1399



Powerbook G4 1.0 1 256 PC2700 32 13.1 1152x768 1.0 1499

Powerbook G4 1.25 1 256 PC2700 32 15.4 1280x854 1.0 1799

Powerbook G4 1.25 1 256 PC2700 64 15.4 1440x960 1.0 1999

Powerbook G4 1.33 2 512 PC2700 64 17 1440x960 1.0 2399



Powerbook G5 1.4 none 128b 256 PC2700 64 15.4 1280x854 1.5 1999

Powerbook G5 1.4 none 128b 512 PC2700 64 15.4 1440x960 1.5 2199

Powerbook G5 1.6 none 128b 512 PC2700 128 17 1440x960 1.5 2599

Powerbook G5 1.6 none 128b 512 PC2700 128 17 1600x1067 1.5 2999









Is there enough balance there? I'm questioning whether customers would really buy a Powerbook G4 versus a Powerbook G5 with those features and prices, especially when my hypothetical Powerbook G5 is 50% thicker and most probably noisier than the PBG4.



And again, note that the low end Powerbook G4 is a 13.1 inch 3:2 aspect ratio LCD. This is the form factor that the 12" Powerbook should have really been. Did a desktop lineup too.



[edit: corrected bad copy-paste job which left out top line of column titles]
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 31
    1.5 inch thick Powerbook isn't Apple's style these days. I think once Fishkill gets those 90 nm chips out, it'll be fine. From what I understand, G5s are more efficient, consume less power, and runn equally hot as G4s, so I don't expect that they would need a thicker case. Love the 13.1 widescreen, but I also think that nce G5s go into the Powerbooks, Moto is toast...meaning no more G4. Can't wait for the day though.





    Powerbook G5 1.6Ghz 2 Gb PC2700 128 Radeon 9600 15.4" 1440x960 1.0" $2599

    Droooooool
  • Reply 2 of 31
    toweltowel Posts: 1,479member
    That 13" PBG4 would be my honey. But doesn't it seem a little confusing to have 8 different displays among 12 models? People have a hard enough time understanding the difference between the 12" and 14" iBooks.
  • Reply 3 of 31
    cubedudecubedude Posts: 1,556member
    What's the point of having two PowerBooks, of the same screen size, having different resolutions?



    Other than that, and the thickness of the G5 PowerBooks, I think that linueup might just happen. Soon.
  • Reply 4 of 31
    rageousrageous Posts: 2,170member
    8 powerbook options available?



    Never.
  • Reply 5 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by filmmaker2002

    1.5 inch thick Powerbook isn't Apple's style these days. I think once Fishkill gets those 90 nm chips out, it'll be fine.



    The power consumption and heat dissipation issues are the same for 90 nm as they are for 130 nm chips. The only difference is about a 25% difference in clock rate. Ie, 90 nm 970 chips will allow up to 1.8 GHz 970 chips to run in notebooks while 130 970 nm chips will allow 1.4 GHz chips to go into notebooks. The key for notebook chips really is voltage cycling combined with frequency cycling.



    Quote:

    From what I understand, G5s are more efficient, consume less power, and runn equally hot as G4s, so I don't expect that they would need a thicker case. Love the 13.1 widescreen, but I also think that nce G5s go into the Powerbooks, Moto is toast...meaning no more G4. Can't wait for the day though.



    Well, at least 7457 profit margins for Motorola will be toast. I'll get to the thickness issue later.



    Quote:

    Powerbook G5 1.6Ghz 2 Gb PC2700 128 Radeon 9600 15.4" 1440x960 1.0" $2599

    Droooooool




    That's 128 bit PC2700! Ever since I got an iBook and Airport, I find it extremely difficult to convince myself to get a desktop. Maybe if I was a pro user or something... but Apple needs a Powerbook G5 ASAP, and they need it by October 04.
  • Reply 6 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by CubeDude

    What's the point of having two PowerBooks, of the same screen size, having different resolutions?



    The point is to cater to a wider percentage of the market. If screen size is holding back a Lintel or Wintel user from switching or a Mac user from upgrading, then Apple shouldn't make it a barrier for them and offer higher screen resolutions.



    I bet that there is a good percentage of AI members who would pony up the dollars for the extra screen real estate, and a nontrivial percentage who won't buy a new Powerbook because of a low screen resolution.



    Quote:

    Other than that, and the thickness of the G5 PowerBooks, I think that linueup might just happen. Soon.



    About the thickness and the 1" thick Powerbook G4 form factor. It is not a tenable form factor for a professional notebook computer. Thermal design budgets for notebook processors have been steadily increasing over the past decade. In the mid-90s, Apple was putting 5 Watt processors in notebooks. Today, they are putting 20 to 25 Watt processors in Powerbooks. In the Intel world they are putting 35 Watt Centrino processors and 60+ Watt P4 processors in x86 notebooks. Fortunately battery technology has been steadily improving so that notebook operation times have stayed steady, perhaps increased a little bit.



    It is only because Motorola has been so decrepit in its fab and processor design that has allowed Apple to go with a 1" form factor for Powerbook G4s. They really should be shipping 30 W 1.5 GHz 7457 with DDR bus today. With the advent of the 970, Apple should be designing to a 30 to 35 Watt budget for a notebook processor. What a 1.5" thick notebook will buy Apple is double the volume that can be used for a battery and therefore 5 hour operation times.



    So the answer to my poorly worded question is that a couple of you guys would rather have a 1" 1.25 GHz Powerbook G4 rather than a 1.5" 1.4 GHz Powerbook G5?



    Buy going to 1.5" thickness, a hypothetical Powerbook G5 can have quite a few features above and beyond the 1" Powerbook G4. Larger hard drive sizes (will allow for 0.5+ inch thick drives), more cardbus slots, faster opticals, maybe even quieter operation.
  • Reply 7 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by rageous

    8 powerbook options available?



    Never.




    It's 4 Powerbook G4 options and 4 Powerbook G5 options, two totally different lines. Just because the names are similar doesn't mean they have the same architecture. An iBook G4 will be much much more similar to a Powerbook G4 than a Powerbook G4 to a Powerbook G5. In fact, the G5 architecture is more different to the G4 architecture, than a G4 architecture is to an Intel architecture. Apple just needs to ensure that a G5 machine is generally always faster than G4 machines. FPU for sure. AltiVec probably, but integer will be tricky.



    And if 4 options per line is too much, just make the higher resolution screens BTO, and it'll cut the iBook line down to the current 3, the Powerbook G4 to 3 and Powerbook G5 to 2.



    The differentiation is really in price, with the performance/price ratio slightly increasing as price goes up. Apple can't unbalance that ratio, especially like they did with the Power Mac G5s. So my plan has iBooks in the $800 to $1300 range, Powerbook G4s in the $1300 to $2000 range and the Powerbook G5s in the $2000 to $3000 range. The only reason I had overlap is because I wanted to have a 17" Powerbook G4.



    I really doubt it would cause much confusion.
  • Reply 8 of 31
    nofeernofeer Posts: 2,422member
    So are you saying you believe apple will have and continue 3 lines ibook, powerbook g4 and pbg5 where is there room for the imac or is that toast. i think that to keep prices low keep a cheap ibook for entry level and schools

    1 ibook g3 12



    2 ibook g4+ 12 14



    3 powerbook g513 15 17 and some differences with superdrive



    i feel as the g5 comes on board later the ibook will merge to g4 or g4+

    a lot has to do with when g5pb comes out, do you think that will be september???

    sept g4+ for pb then after jan pb goes to g5



    i thought you guys feel apple is trying to dump Moto, so how do they drop moto brds and keep 2 or 3 lines

    or do all go ibm g5 .8 1 1.2 1.4 1.8

    wierd
  • Reply 9 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by NOFEER

    So are you saying you believe apple will have and continue 3 lines ibook, powerbook g4 and pbg5



    This is armchair CEO dreaming. It has no reflection on what Apple will do. With that said, yes, Apple should have 3 notebook lines. Generically, a Velocity Engine capable notebook in the $800 to $1200 range, a midrange notebook from $1300 to $2000 and a high end notebook from $2000 to $3000.



    Quote:

    where is there room for the imac or is that toast.



    Er, look at the thread title.



    Quote:

    i thought you guys feel apple is trying to dump Moto, so how do they drop moto brds and keep 2 or 3 lines

    or do all go ibm g5 .8 1 1.2 1.4 1.8

    wierd




    Well, if 1 to 1.4 GHz 970 chips are cheaper than 1. to 1.4 GHz 7457 chips, then by all means, Apple should be transitioning to the 970 as soon as they can. Apple can further differentiate 970 chips by have 512k L2 and 1MB L2 cache versions of the 970 within the next year. When the Power5 derived chip arrives, then there is further differentiation in performance.
  • Reply 10 of 31
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    That's a crazy, confusing line-up of thicknesses, speeds, screen sizes, resolutions, etc.







    How about, instead, we just stick to something like:



    iBook (let's pretend it's the future and it's a G4)

    12"

    15"



    PowerBook (let's pretend it's the future and it's a G5)

    12"

    15"

    17"



    Two lines: consumer and pro.



    iBook: PLENTY of power for OS X, the iApps, any grandpas and soccer moms doing the iMovie/iPhoto/iDVD thing. Pretty much the power and specs of today's 17" iMac: 1GHz G4, 133MHz bus, usual assortment of I/O and drive options. Still white plastic, still geared toward the "iCrowd".



    PowerBook: Gut-wrenching, eye-drilling speed for those who TRULY need and want it. No compromises. Fast everything, high-end graphics, fast-as-possible SuperDrives, large RAM ceiling, DVI and L3 cache in ALL models.



    Basically, think of it like this: tomorrow's iBook should match (or slightly surpass, give or take) today's high-end LCD iMac. Tomorrow's PowerBook should be the portable "little brother" to the new G5 (as much as possible, within reason...can do without that whole "nine fans" business).







    But here's the thing (I've said this before):



    Apple can buy loads of the 12" screens (as they currently do, I suppose) for the two small laptops. And they can buy loads of the 15" screens because now the high-end iBook has a 15" widescreen.



    Then they'll be buying gobs of 17" displays because of the 17" PowerBook, 17" iMac and (pretend, won't you?) a, say, 17" Cinema Display, replacing today's 4:3 17" Studio Display.



    All Apple has to do, display-wise, is buy 12", 15" and 17" for their various laptops and the LCD iMac and low-end Cinema Display).



    And, as now, things like RAM ceilings, DVI, the different chips themselves, L3 cache, I/O, etc. differentiates the two lines.



    Any "consumer" who honestly can't make do with a 1GHz+ G4-based laptop (basically today's high-end iMac in a small, portable body) isn't a "consumer" and needs to then shut up and consider a PowerBook already.







    No, having 12 models, six resolutions, 4 or 5 display sizes, overlapping prices and feature sets is just confusing, annoying and nobody wants to deal with it.



    Least of all, ME.



    Clear cut: are you a regular user or a high-end pro? If you're a regular user, do you want a 12" or 15" screen? Do you want a combo drive or SuperDrive?



    And so on...



    Make it easy. Make it sensible. Build it and they might come...if you put a little MARKETING behind it, Apple...



    Ahem...







    I realize I may be asking the impossible with that last part...







    iBook 12" (1024x768)

    - 1.2GHz G4 (more or less, depending on Motorola, "real life" and all...)

    - 133MHz bus

    - 256MB RAM (expandable to 1GB)

    - 60-80GB hard drive

    - Combo or SuperDrive

    - 32MB graphics

    - Usual I/O

    - AirPort Extreme

    - Bluetooth



    iBook 15" (1280x800...or whatever the PowerBook's resolution is)

    - 1.2GHz G4

    - 133MHz bus

    - 256MB RAM (expandable to 1GB)

    - 60-80GB hard drive

    - Combo or SuperDrive

    - 32MB graphics

    - Usual I/O

    - AirPort Extreme

    - Bluetooth



    As for PowerBooks, sky is the limit! Go nuts...







    But, in a nutshell, 1.6-2GHz+ G5s, honkin' bus speeds, ridiculous RAM ceiling, 64 and 128MB graphics, huge hard drives, FireWire 800, USB 2, DVI, light-up keyboards on all models, etc.
  • Reply 11 of 31
    nervnerv Posts: 26member
    No way. The iBook goes G4 when the PowerBook goes G5. There's way too much crossover in the mid-range of the proposed lineup.



    It's bad branding to have a PowerBook lineup that sports two different processors. It's just too confusing to the average consumer.
  • Reply 12 of 31
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    Totally, I agree. That's why my plan is better



    The idea is to simplify, streamline and make decisions EASIER. Not beat people over the head with "wait, how come I can get this PowerBook with a G4 here, but I can spend $100 more and get a G5 PowerBook and it has...".



    Ugh, makes me dizzy just thinking about it...



    Two chips, two lines. Within those two lines, pretty much the screen size is what separates the two. Each iBook shares common specs/features (in other words you don't take a hit getting the 12" model because it's just as fast and has the same sorts of options as the larger one).



    Same with the PowerBook: buying a 12" PowerBook doesn't mean you give up L3 cache, DVI, light-up keyboard, etc.



    It pretty much gets down to:



    1. Do you want good power or AMAZING power?



    2. Okay then, what size screen?



    That's it.



  • Reply 13 of 31
    gargar Posts: 1,201member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by NerV

    No way. The iBook goes G4 when the PowerBook goes G5. There's way too much crossover in the mid-range of the proposed lineup.



    It's bad branding to have a PowerBook lineup that sports two different processors. It's just too confusing to the average consumer.




    the average consumer won't buy a powerbook, does he?...

    the average consumer doesn't buy apple. he probally shops for a dell at the dell website.

    ever seen that website? now that's confusing.

    but the consumer don't care some how.



    the reason why there will be no G4 powerbook when there is a G5 powerbook is the same reason why pscates thinks there will be a 15" ibook (i liked his 14.1"cd ibook moke-up, though): costs.



    it's much cheaper for apple to produce 3 G5 powerbooks (12", 15" and 17") with, for each screensize 2 different processorspeeds. so the user can choose between fast and faster (people love to choose and make a reasonable decision).
  • Reply 14 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by pscates

    That's a crazy, confusing line-up of thicknesses, speeds, screen sizes, resolutions, etc.



    Hardly confusing. I'll reply to the criticism in a later post. To satiate your desire, is this simple enough for you?



    Code:




    Clock L3 Vid LCD Screen Thick

    Rate Cache Main Memory Mem Size Resolu ness Price

    (GHz) (MB) (MB) (MB) (in) tion (in) (USD)

    ---- ---- -------------- --- ---- --------- ---- -----

    iBook G4 0.87 none 128 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 799

    iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 999



    Powerbook G4 1.0 1 256 PC2700 32 13.1 1152x768 1.0 1499

    Powerbook G4 1.25 1 256 PC2700 32 15.4 1280x854 1.0 1799



    Powerbook G5 1.4 none 128b 256 PC2700 64 15.4 1280x854 1.5 1999

    Powerbook G5 1.6 none 128b 512 PC2700 128 17 1440x960 1.5 2599





    Build to order options:



    Powerbook G4 1.25 1 256 PC2700 64 15.4 1440x960 1.0 1999

    Powerbook G5 1.4 none 128b 512 PC2700 64 15.4 1440x960 1.5 2199

    Powerbook G5 1.6 none 128b 512 PC2700 128 17 1600x1067 1.5 2999



    Eliminated:



    iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 14.1 1024x768 1.35 1199

    iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 14.1 1152x864 1.35 1399

    Powerbook G4 1.33 2 512 PC2700 64 17 1440x960 1.0 2399









    I could care less about the 14" iBook, yet Apple feels the need to sell this unique product going on 1.5 years now. So, I stuck it in there previously since it seems Apple sees a market for it.



    Quote:

    How about, instead, we just stick to something like:

    ...

    Two lines: consumer and pro.



    iBook: PLENTY of power for OS X, the iApps, any grandpas and soccer moms doing the iMovie/iPhoto/iDVD thing. Pretty much the power and specs of today's 17" iMac: 1GHz G4, 133MHz bus, usual assortment of I/O and drive options. Still white plastic, still geared toward the "iCrowd".



    PowerBook: Gut-wrenching, eye-drilling speed for those who TRULY need and want it. No compromises. Fast everything, high-end graphics, fast-as-possible SuperDrives, large RAM ceiling, DVI and L3 cache in ALL models.




    If PowerBook models are in the $1300 to $2000 range. Sure. However, Apple feels it necessary to have notebooks in the $2000 to $3000 which creates a huge hole in the high end or a hole in the mid-range if they price as they are now. Additionally, I see a definite need and different markets for 3 different notebook users: affordable low end, capable mid range and desktop replacement/power user high end.



    If you note, my lineup intent is based on a slightly increasing performance/price curve. More price means more performance, and I include screen resolution as something people would pay more for. Slightly increasing curve means the higher priced items offer more bang for the buck for the customer and higher margin for Apple.



    Quote:

    Tomorrow's PowerBook should be the portable "little brother" to the new G5 (as much as possible, within reason...can do without that whole "nine fans" business).



    Actually, I'm envisioning a 1.5 inch thick Powerbook G5 as having an aluminum structure, 3 thermal zones, 10+ 0.75" fans, aerogel insulation, 4 SO-DIMMs, 2 Cardbus slots, easily removable bottom for hard drive, optical and memory upgrades, and a 120+ Watt-hour battery for 6+ hour operation time. All using a Power Mac G5 inspired design theme.



    Quote:

    But here's the thing (I've said this before):



    Apple can buy loads of the 12" screens (as they currently do, I suppose) for the two small laptops. And they can buy loads of the 15" screens because now the high-end iBook has a 15" widescreen.



    Then they'll be buying gobs of 17" displays because of the 17" PowerBook, 17" iMac and (pretend, won't you?) a, say, 17" Cinema Display, replacing today's 4:3 17" Studio Display.



    All Apple has to do, display-wise, is buy 12", 15" and 17" for their various laptops and the LCD iMac and low-end Cinema Display).




    Can you explain why Apple sells a 14.1" iBook? I'm sure they fully understend your ideas of have common components across products. They've been employing it for a long time now. But yet, there is this unique product Apple is selling.



    Seeing as they do, I think they can in the least offer higher resolution screens as BTO options and have 13.1" 3:2 aspect ratio PowerBook G4.



    Quote:

    Any "consumer" who honestly can't make do with a 1GHz+ G4-based laptop (basically today's high-end iMac in a small, portable body) isn't a "consumer" and needs to then shut up and consider a PowerBook already.



    The world doesn't consist of 2 distinct kinds of Apple notebook customers. By having low end, mid-range and high end, Apple will be making more people happy and will attract more Wintel/Lintel switchers.



    Quote:

    Clear cut: are you a regular user or a high-end pro? If you're a regular user, do you want a 12" or 15" screen? Do you want a combo drive or SuperDrive?



    I'm something between a regular user and a high end pro. But that's irrelevent. I want what I want, what I can afford, and what I see is worth the money I spend. I really don't care what sort of user I am.



    Quote:

    iBook 12" (1024x768)

    iBook 15" (1280x800...or whatever the PowerBook's resolution is)

    As for PowerBooks, sky is the limit! Go nuts...



    What are your prices?
  • Reply 15 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by pscates

    Totally, I agree. That's why my plan is better



    No it's not.



    Quote:

    The idea is to simplify, streamline and make decisions EASIER. Not beat people over the head with "wait, how come I can get this PowerBook with a G4 here, but I can spend $100 more and get a G5 PowerBook and it has...".



    Ugh, makes me dizzy just thinking about it...




    Do you and NerV really know why Apple simplified to a 2x2 product matrix 4 years ago?



    It wasn't because Apple was selling less machines due to a confusing lineup. As gar said, people will buy the Apple brand regardless of how confusing the lineup is as long as the brand offers competitive products. My original lineup was very simple and left the customer basic tradeoffs for how much money they want to put into the machine. [I primarily wanted to know how people would react to less performance in a thin package versus more performance in a thick package.] Essentially, it was the more they spent, the more they got.



    The reason Apple went to a 2x2 product matrix was because in the Spindler/Amelio era, many of Apple's computer lineups had custom components and Apple was unable to predict which product would sell the most. With their inventory model, Apple ended having shortages in high demand products and oversupply in low demand product resulting in months long product deliveries, and more damaging, dumping of products in overabundance. When Jobs came along, they went to a "semi" just-in-time manufacturing model and made all computers with as many common components as possible. All G4 computers have the basic same system and I/O chipsets.



    With this sort of manufacturing model, having a larger product matrix won't be as much of an inventory hassle, so Apple has expanded its products. It has the Xserve which is a Power Mac in a 1U form factor, 2 All-In-One products and 2 desktop lineups consisting of the PowerMac G4 and PowerMac G5. I don't think the "Power Macintosh" brand is being hurt at all with 2 totally different architectures sharing the same brand name.



    Unfortunately, Apple still doesn't want to price their products following a linear performance/price curve. The Power Mac G5 should have been all duals: 2x1.6 for 1999, 2x1.8 for 2499 and 2x2.0 for 3000. It seems they wanted primarilly $3000 PMG5 sales, so they made it the best bang for the buck machine. The market will always migrate to the best performance/price model.
  • Reply 16 of 31
    jobjob Posts: 420member
    Quote:

    iBook G4:

    1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 999



    Powerbook G4:

    1.0 1 256 PC2700 32 13.1 1152x768 1.0 1499



    I can understand all of the models except these two.



    Why the $500 price difference? Is there something besides thickness and cache that I'm missing? Is the 13.1 screen really worth that much?
  • Reply 17 of 31
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by THT Hardly confusing. I'll reply to the criticism in a later post. To satiate your desire, is this simple enough for you?



    No need to be a wisebutt. I just think that's a lot of overlap and numbers. That's just me.



    Quote:

    I could care less about the 14" iBook, yet Apple feels the need to sell this unique product going on 1.5 years now. So, I stuck it in there previously since it seems Apple sees a market for it.



    I know that. But I also bet a 15" would sell fairly well too.

    I stated very clearly - as you did - that "let's pretend...". In MY pretend world, I get a 12" and 15" iBook.





    Quote:

    If PowerBook models are in the $1300 to $2000 range. Sure. However, Apple feels it necessary to have notebooks in the $2000 to $3000 which creates a huge hole in the high end or a hole in the mid-range if they price as they are now. Additionally, I see a definite need and different markets for 3 different notebook users: affordable low end, capable mid range and desktop replacement/power user high end.



    Maybe. I don't know. Maybe that's Apple's boneheaded pricing/tiering causing this to even be an issue? Hell, why not have just ONE laptop, the iLap, which is hugely customizable and available in a hugely wide range of prices, features, specs, screen sizes, etc.? I'm being kinda silly here, but kinda not...



    Quote:

    I'm something between a regular user and a high end pro. But that's irrelevent. I want what I want, what I can afford, and what I see is worth the money I spend. I really don't care what sort of user I am.



    That describes me too. But that's not how Apple seems to see it, do they? THEY set up the "i" and the "Power" distinctions, not us. That's why I like my idea: power and MORE power. No laptop in Apple's line is less than a 1GHz G4...TOTALLY respectable and able to do anything you throw at it. And kinda why I like the idea in the previous paragraph, silliness aside. So everything is completely capable. Only one model is HUGELY more so...for those that truly need it (3D, animation, modeling, science, engineering, etc.).



    Quote:

    What are your prices?



    Heck, I don't know. I don't know how much things cost, so I'd be a fool to start flinging numbers out with any sort of authority. However, I'd LIKE to imagine that there could be a basic 12" iBook in the $799-999 range at some point and that no PowerBook would be over $3000. Somewhere in that $2000-2200 span would sit my lineup, I suppose.



    Something for everyone. But no one model "doing without" in each line. You don't "take a hit" going with the smaller, 12" model as you currently do with the PowerBook. Like I said, it'll come down pretty much to "are you a "regular user" (consumer, graphics, desktop publishing, surfing, e-mail, iApps, etc. like probably the majority of us are) or are you a super-duper, high-end graphics monkey needing speed, power, and more speed and more power (or just like the idea of owning the best, fastest, and "most" of any given product). Those would be the G5 PowerBook buyers. Anyone with the need, desire and/or money.



    Once you determine that (and it's not THAT hard...who among us, honestly, couldn't be fairly well-served with a 1-1.4GHz G4 in 90% of the scenarios we encounter in our computer-using lives?), then you say "well, what size screen would I like?".



    Most of us (including myself, a fairly regular user of Photoshop, encoding music, dealing with large files, laying out catalogs, etc.) would be happy to own a 1.4GHz G4 iBook, I'd imagine.



    I think I'd waste money on a G5 tower OR laptop, considering what I do and all. But others out there would truly put it to work!
  • Reply 18 of 31
    jobjob Posts: 420member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by pscates

    You don't "take a hit" going with the smaller, 12" model as you currently do with the PowerBook.



    Beautiful concept. Now if only we could get Apple to implement it.



    I fully agree with your simplified lineup. It would clear up any questions/performance overlaps between the models (i.e. the current 12" iBook [900Mhz] and the 12" Powerbook [867Mhz])
  • Reply 19 of 31
    thttht Posts: 3,242member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by job

    I can understand all of the models except these two.



    Why the $500 price difference? Is there something besides thickness and cache that I'm missing? Is the 13.1 screen really worth that much?




    It is such because all I did was cut and paste from my previous lineup. The prices and features can be jiggerred later on. Ok, here is some jiggering:



    Code:




    Clock L3 Vid LCD Screen Thick

    Rate Cache Main Memory Mem Size Resolu ness Price

    (GHz) (MB) (MB) (MB) (in) tion (in) (USD)

    ---- ---- -------------- --- ---- --------- ---- -----

    iBook G4 0.87 none 256 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 899

    iBook G4 1.0 none 256 PC2100 32 12.1 1024x768 1.35 1099



    Powerbook G4 1.0 1 256 PC2700 32 13.1 1152x768 1.0 1399

    Powerbook G4 1.25 2 256 PC2700 32 15.4 1280x854 1.0 1699



    Powerbook G5 1.4 none 128b 256 PC2700 64 15.4 1280x854 1.5 1999

    Powerbook G5 1.6 none 128b 512 PC2700 128 17 1440x960 1.5 2599





    Build to order options:



    Powerbook G4 1.25 1 256 PC2700 64 15.4 1440x960 1.0 1999

    Powerbook G5 1.4 none 128b 512 PC2700 64 15.4 1440x960 1.5 2199

    Powerbook G5 1.6 none 128b 512 PC2700 128 17 1600x1067 1.5 2999









    Obviously, each lineup would also be separated by hard drive sizes and speeds, optical drives, video chip, video out type (DVI, S-video, VGA), video spanning or mirroring, FireWire 800, cardbus slots, optical audio, and other cool features to make up the price differences.
  • Reply 20 of 31
    jobjob Posts: 420member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by THT

    Obviously, each lineup would also be separated by hard drive sizes and speeds, optical drives, video chip, video out type (DVI, S-video, VGA), video spanning or mirroring, FireWire 800, cardbus slots, optical audio, and other cool features to make up the price differences.



    Gotcha. Looks good now. Prices seem more in-line with what we might expect from Apple.



    Now I'll leave you and pscates to duke it out over the different product matrix concepts.
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