Do you want to work for Apple or if you did...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
what would you want to do or what could you do for them?



Personally, I have already decided that Apple is where I want to work. I am not being unrealistic in what it is that I want to do for them. I would love to be involved with their K-12 initiatives and marketing, though in my heart industrial design is just so appealing, it is not feasible for me.



I am not what you would call a Math head, I get B's in high school math, so I know the design is just probably out of my league. But maybe it is good I recognize my shortcomings and see my potential and where my interests are, and how I can direct my choice of major once I enroll in the University?



Working for Apple would to me be, the best thing in the world. Being a part of the company that changed the world and innovates at a tremendous pace would be self fulfilling; and set me at ease with the inner need to help others in the process of also helping myself.



Gathering market date, doing research and possibly being on the end of some of the creative aspects of marketing are all possibilities for me, I think. Maybe consulting with Apple and schools on how to go about implementing Macs in ways that are effective, for cost and productivity.



But enough about what I want to do...If you could work for Apple, what would you want to do or what is realistic for you to potentially do there? Is anyone else here aspiring to work for Apple, if so have you already graduated from colllege or are you still in school?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 37
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    If they hired me on as CEO in 15 years that would be pretty cool. Otherwise, there are more lucrative, more interesting tech opportunities out there, ready to be tapped.



    As far as industrial design goes, you can take classes if you want, but it's something that's easier to teach yourself than, say, electrical engineering. If you have artistic vision and some abilities to work well with CAD tools, you can be a pretty successful industrial designer these days.
  • Reply 2 of 37
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    Quote:

    being on the end of some of the creative aspects of marketing are all possibilities for me, I think.



    But nobody else thinks so.
  • Reply 3 of 37
    messiahtoshmessiahtosh Posts: 1,754member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Eugene

    But nobody else thinks so.



    Everyone's a critic, right? If nothing else, the junk I've made about Apple and have shown to people here, at least made a point. They were at least creative, and had some good points as well as some bad. If nothing else, they generated a huge response from users, getting over 1,000 views. Better than doing nothing, gotta start somewhere.



    I wonder what Lee Clow was doing in high schoool, probably doodling and daydreaming...



    P.S. I wont play your game so dont go down that path. Please stay on topic, thank you.
  • Reply 4 of 37
    I would work at an Apple store... and lead by example...
  • Reply 5 of 37
    murbotmurbot Posts: 5,261member
    I would give erotic massages to all the slutty girls working there.
  • Reply 6 of 37
    gsxrboygsxrboy Posts: 565member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by murbot

    ....all the slutty girls working there.



    !!!!!



    We so need apple hq retail stores in Australia then
  • Reply 7 of 37
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    I'm more qualified for industrial design (but not an industrial designer by any means), but I'm more interested in software design, particularly UI design, (which I am also not a specialist in of course). Hell, I'd really prefer to design them a new HQ, especially the skunkworks area.
  • Reply 8 of 37
    cowerdcowerd Posts: 579member
    Quote:

    As far as industrial design goes, you can take classes if you want, but it's something that's easier to teach yourself than, say, electrical engineering. If you have artistic vision and some abilities to work well with CAD tools, you can be a pretty successful industrial designer these days.



    Hows that again? Knowing CAD makes you an ID? How does that qualify you to understand production processes, engineering and materials?



    Having artistic vision and knowing CAD makes you just one of thousands of college students in any design oriented field. Thats all.
  • Reply 9 of 37
    kraig911kraig911 Posts: 912member
    well unfortunately what steve doesn't get, nor the rest of you though I'm in creative marketing... sales is what gets things going, and not having good sales can kill you. I'd wanna work in some sort of development team that had a sales minded initiative for enterprise sales. There's so much untapped, its ridiculous.
  • Reply 10 of 37
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Messiahtosh

    what would you want to do or what could you do for them?



    If you could work for Apple, what would you want to do or what is realistic for you to potentially do there?
    Is anyone else here aspiring to work for Apple, if so have you already graduated from colllege or are you still in school? [/B]



    Supplier Quality Assurance, absolutely (vendor surveys, first articles, source inspection/release, et al); if Apple does those kinds o' thangs; after I retire from my current career.
  • Reply 11 of 37
    Quote:

    Originally posted by fantastic happy dinner man

    Supplier Quality Assurance, absolutely (vendor surveys, first articles, source inspection/release, et al); if Apple's doin' those kinds o' thangs 6 years hence when I retire from my current career.



  • Reply 12 of 37
    k squaredk squared Posts: 608member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by cowerd

    Hows that again? Knowing CAD makes you an ID? How does that qualify you to understand production processes, engineering and materials?



    Having artistic vision and knowing CAD makes you just one of thousands of college students in any design oriented field. Thats all.




    Well, reading that BuonRotto is an architect, as I am too, is a pretty damn good start.
  • Reply 13 of 37
    ebbyebby Posts: 3,110member
    I'll be a beta tester.

    I've done that before.
  • Reply 14 of 37
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by cowerd

    Hows that again? Knowing CAD makes you an ID? How does that qualify you to understand production processes, engineering and materials?



    Having artistic vision and knowing CAD makes you just one of thousands of college students in any design oriented field. Thats all.




    It doesn't take many projects to figure out the materials/manufacturing, especially if you're focused on a certain industry, which is usually the case. I was more commenting on my belief that a design-centric education is somewhat unnecessary if you really have what it takes. So learn how to use the tools and study the history on your own time.



    Read the books, learn the tools, get a summer job at a place that does injection molding plastic, and you're in a pretty good position. A degree in industrial design or whatnot is just a piece of paper you need if you want to get hired by a big company. The knowledge you need to be a good EE is much more abstract. That is, we explore forms since the day we are born, and we do it all the time. Frequency domain calculus and transcendental numbers, to name a few, are not concepts we're born with. Architecture is a bit more complicated given the more vast array of materials and the structural limitations. That is, if I'm designing a bridge there's a lot more I have to worry about, and it's not really practical to add steel all over the place. If I'm doing plastic, I can add a mm of thickness without worrying about cost, weight, or visual impact, and I can increase the strength by a lot.
  • Reply 15 of 37
    m.o.s.tm.o.s.t Posts: 255member
    I would sue Dell (Dell DJ) for their false claims...

    (as per my post) link below



    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...threadid=38949
  • Reply 16 of 37
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by M.O.S.T

    I would sue Dell (Dell DJ) for their false claims...

    (as per my post) link below



    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...threadid=38949




    Apple has no right to sue Dell for false claims since they are using Apple's own numbers for the comparison. On the other hand, Apple is getting FREE publicity on the Dell DJ store page, so I don't see why Apple would even want to get involved. Dell's only hurting itself by making such a comparison.
  • Reply 17 of 37
    ipodandimacipodandimac Posts: 3,273member
    well i had every intention of working for apple a year ago, but i was interested in the marketing dept, specifically doing the graphics side of commercials and print ads. i've since realized i should be going after chiat/tbwa, so thats where i wanna be.
  • Reply 18 of 37
    m.o.s.tm.o.s.t Posts: 255member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Eugene

    Apple has no right to sue Dell for false claims since they are using Apple's own numbers for the comparison. On the other hand, Apple is getting FREE publicity on the Dell DJ store page, so I don't see why Apple would even want to get involved. Dell's only hurting itself by making such a comparison.



    have you viewed :



    click here
  • Reply 19 of 37
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by M.O.S.T

    have you viewed :



    click here




    Yes, I have. It's called free publicity. It's like when Apple mentioned Napster in a press release. Why did they need to do that?
  • Reply 20 of 37
    cowerdcowerd Posts: 579member
    Quote:

    I was more commenting on my belief that a design-centric education is somewhat unnecessary if you really have what it takes



    what does that mean? that you are so talented that you can shit out a good design between your cereal and coffee at breakfast? i've spent a lot of time in design studios, and i've see very few people who have an innate ability to design. i know lots of people who can produce pretty pictures, but that doesn't make them designers.
    Quote:

    That is, if I'm designing a bridge there's a lot more I have to worry about, and it's not really practical to add steel all over the place. If I'm doing plastic, I can add a mm of thickness without worrying about cost, weight, or visual impact, and I can increase the strength by a lot.



    you don't understand scale do you? one mm of extra plastic can turn an elegant design into a bloated POS. similarly one extra mm of plastic could kill your profit or get you fired because the piece is structurally deficient and a massive kludge isn't going to cover it up.
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