The 10th planet

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
US astronomist have discovered a 10th planet, far, far away of the sun. A pluton like planet. a very cold and unfriendly place.



Her name is Sedna (the inuit goddess of the sea)
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    1700km across, even much smaller than Pluto.



    I don't know if this is going to meet most people's definition of a 'planet'.



    OTOH, I'd have to see it's orbital characteristics before making a judgment on its status as a planet or Kuiper body. If it's roughly inline with the inner 8, then sure, call it a planet. If not, then call it a Kuiper body.
  • Reply 3 of 25
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    Defiant thanks for your link.



    Kickaha you are right, indeed the same question of definition is also made for pluto. Pluto and Sedna : same struggle (we want to be considered planets, we want to be considered planets ....)



    Anyway it's a long trip of 12 billions of kilometers.
  • Reply 4 of 25
    lucaluca Posts: 3,833member
    I think this just shows that Pluto is one of many Kuiper Belt objects floating around. There are probably dozens, even hundreds of objects between 1000 and 2500 km across in the Kuiper Belt, and Pluto and Sedna just happen to be close enough to actually see. There are a few other objects out there (one called Quaoar is a bit over 1000 km across). I think the discovery of Sedna will help demote Pluto to the status of Kuiper Belt object.



    I think people called asteroid Ceres a planet when it was first discovered, but as more and more asteroids were discovered in the same orbit, it was demoted. Then there is Mercury, which I think is a planet not because of its size but because it is one of the only objects in that area of space.
  • Reply 5 of 25
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Defiant

    Cool



    Bah! What's cool about? Just more work for me... gotta go track down data for the series expansions needed calculate the coordinates of yet another damned planet, rework the code of my astronomy web site's Java applet... I say send a missile and blow the thing up so we don't have to worry about it.
  • Reply 6 of 25
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by shetline

    Bah! What's cool about? Just more work for me... gotta go track down data for the series expansions needed calculate the coordinates of yet another damned planet, rework the code of my astronomy web site's Java applet... I say send a missile and blow the thing up so we don't have to worry about it.



    If you want to blow up that thing you have to calculate the coordiantes of this damned planet
  • Reply 7 of 25
    jimdreamworxjimdreamworx Posts: 1,063member
    And here I thought there was already one...



    http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Corr.../hafernik.html



  • Reply 8 of 25
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    i say we pass a constitutional amendment banning calling this a planet...sure, we can give it a different name with the same rights of the other planets (90% are planets, 10% are "other"...ratios sound about right)...but there is something special and wholesome and correct about the other planets that doesn't fit with this planetoid....



    g
  • Reply 9 of 25
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    So what does this mean for astrologers
  • Reply 10 of 25
    curiousuburbcuriousuburb Posts: 3,325member
    relative sizes for scale





    NASA TV is running interviews with Scientists who discovered it from 3-7pm EST today (in progress)



    redder than anything in our system except mars, may have its own moon...

    At an estimated size of three-fourths the size of Pluto, it is likely the largest object found in the solar system since Pluto was discovered in 1930.



    might help justify the Pluto Kuiper Express mission that's been on/off for years



    [edit: bbc's image has distance scale too ]

  • Reply 11 of 25
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Wrong Robot

    So what does this mean for astrologers



    It will be an excuse for all their false predictions. Our theory was right, but we did not have all the elements of the puzzle ...
  • Reply 12 of 25
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    Quote:

    (90% are planets, 10% are "other"...ratios sound about right)



    make it 97% and 3% and it would be more accurate.
  • Reply 13 of 25
  • Reply 14 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Hassan i Sabbah

    It might have a moon.



    So I have heard

    Quote:

    Originally posted by curiousuburb

    may have its own moon...





  • Reply 15 of 25
    daverdaver Posts: 496member
    Who keeps picking the stupid names for these things? At least it's better than Quaoar.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    billybobskybillybobsky Posts: 1,914member
    Yes it should be called Billybobsky...
  • Reply 17 of 25
    curiousuburbcuriousuburb Posts: 3,325member
    Actually, during the interview feeds on NASA TV, the guy who headed the discovery team said they do get naming rights, "but you can't name it after yourself".



    All of the Kuiper - Oort planetoids/bodies are likely to have names from Arctic Mythology (following the mythological trend started with most other celestial bodies)



    IIRC, they said Sedra is the Inuit goddess of the water (and fishing?) and when they were considering mythological names, the story of Sedra best fit what they knew about this odd object.



    Extra-Solar Planets are often unromantically named. Of the more than 100 found thus far, almost all are alphanumerically anonymous.



    The star Epsilon Eridani (only 10LY away) contains a planet at one point named "c"

    All Trekkies know that Roddenberry long ago specified the Planet Vulcan orbits Epsilon Eridani.



    bonus irony... the guy who found the planet fictionally home to Vulcans (earth's first contact)...



    Cochran
  • Reply 18 of 25
    randycat99randycat99 Posts: 1,919member
    People- this is obviously just a giant "space egg". What could possibly hatch from it? I dunno, but I bet it would kick some pretty serious ass, so don't go waking it up by cracking the shell with your damn 'speeriments! Obviously, it never hatched because it wandered so far away from the sun. Just let it sit out there latent in the cold, why don't ya?!



    I mean, doesn't anyone ever remember how Godzilla came about? Somebody disturbed him from his slumber, no? Now we're talking about something who's babies are the size of small planets. JUST LEAVE WELL ENOUGH ALONE, DAMNIT!...





    Anybody remember that space-based organism in ST TNG named Guntoo? That thing was bad-ass! I really related to it because it wanted to die since it was the last of its kind and it felt so alone. Plus the episode had Romulans in it, so this was one of my favorite. It's always cool when the Romulans are involved!
  • Reply 19 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Randycat99

    <Funnyness>



    I don't know what you're talking about but its hilarious
  • Reply 20 of 25
    crusadercrusader Posts: 1,129member
    WOW!



    I bet it's really friggin cold...







    Dude... if there is a tenth planet... then... dude like everyone has been wrong about 9 planets... for, like, ever. So if.... our knowledge about things is wrong, then we are wrong... so... maybe we don't exist!
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