Regardless of G4 or G5, would next PB have brighter screen?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
I had the chance to stop by the local Future Shop today, and checked out some of the PC laptops. None really caught my eye except for one Toshiba and a Sony Vaio.



What stood out among these two were their extremely bright, crisp displays. They seemed to have almost a glass-like coating. Not glossy but a smoother than any of Apple's laptops. Quite nice actually. The screen also looked good from pretty much all angles.

The one downside was the resolution. The 15.4" Toshiba had a default res of 1900x1200!! I could barely read the name of the files.



That said, I'm hoping regardless of processor, that the next PB rev brings us a better display. Some would like a higher resolution, but I'd just make it brighter.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    crusadercrusader Posts: 1,129member
    Yes.
  • Reply 2 of 27
    Sounds good to me.
  • Reply 3 of 27
    messiahtoshmessiahtosh Posts: 1,754member
    Would a display like that cost more or be thicker?
  • Reply 4 of 27
    jadejade Posts: 379member
    The sony's with the xbrite screen are in the same price class as the powerbooks. They are also seen in displays made by Sharp and Fuji and comparitive in thickness to current LCDs. Extra crisp and more like high def TV.
  • Reply 5 of 27
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    brighter screen would hinder battery life, the battery life isn't that good presently, I'm not saying it won't happen, but don't count on it unless apple gets their hands on some better battery tech, or something \
  • Reply 6 of 27
    dmband0026dmband0026 Posts: 2,345member
    What about OLEDs, is it possible to see those in the next generation of PBs?
  • Reply 7 of 27
    jadejade Posts: 379member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Wrong Robot

    brighter screen would hinder battery life, the battery life isn't that good presently, I'm not saying it won't happen, but don't count on it unless apple gets their hands on some better battery tech, or something \



    Have you seen the screens he is talking about. They are not regular LCDs but brighter, new screen technology.



    Not only are they bright, but text also looks crisper and sharper.
  • Reply 8 of 27
    I can only pray that Apple comes aboard with the rest of the notebook LCD world and gives its customers leading edge TFT technology in the G5ivver PB's.



    (as opposed to the 2 or 3 year old technology/specs of the current PB line)
  • Reply 9 of 27
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Wrong Robot

    brighter screen would hinder battery life, the battery life isn't that good presently, I'm not saying it won't happen, but don't count on it unless apple gets their hands on some better battery tech, or something \



    I'd rather take that decision myself than have Apple take it for me. I'd like a nice bright screen. I can always turn brightbess down if I'm running on battery. But if Apple from the start takes sh*tty screens, I cannot adjust!
  • Reply 10 of 27
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    It is not only the brightness the problem with the displays Apple uses today in the Powerbooks. The brightness certainly is affected by backlight, which cannot be strong in such a thin display. I don't know if and how this can be corrected without compromising display thickness.



    The displays are not of good quality generally. The 12" Powerbook displays are essentially iBook displays, some people say even worse. The viewing angles are bad with strong colour shift as view angle changes in all Powerbooks. These are issues that need to be addressed soon.



    There is another problem I don't know how to explain. In the OS 9 days, the Powerbook (G3) displays needed no calibration to display correctly colour in the interface, windows and desktop elements, at least for average use. Now with OS X, by default (Color LCD profile) there is always a haze in the screen that is very difficult to eliminate with calibration. On the other hand, the sRGB profile appears very blueish and it is very difficult to adjust too (even with SuperCal). Something is wrong, I don't know what: OS X colour management or the display quality? I am inclined to believe it's the later.



    Final point: is it possible using current OS X technologies to change LCD resolutions to non-native modes without quality loss, like in CRTs? I thought a vector based OS, like X, could do that. I am not sure if it needs some hardware (display) support for this. If this is possible, then Apple could use much higher resolution displays in the Powerbooks, without compromising quality while switching resolutions.
  • Reply 11 of 27
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by PB

    Final point: is it possible using current OS X technologies to change LCD resolutions to non-native modes without quality loss, like in CRTs? I thought a vector based OS, like X, could do that. I am not sure if it needs some hardware (display) support for this. If this is possible, then Apple could use much higher resolution displays in the Powerbooks, without compromising quality while switching resolutions.



    There's simply no point in "changing resolution" when LCD has a fixed amount of pixels and therefore a fixed resolution. Whenever you're not in the native resolution, or exactly half the native resolution, you're necessarily blurring pixels to make them fit the actual resolution.



    It would make more sense to ask if OS X interface is "resolution independent". (It isn't.) Someday we'll have resolution independent graphics but it's not close by any means. Then the interface elements will be able to retain same proportions with minimal quality loss, no matter what the resolution is.
  • Reply 12 of 27
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    It would make more sense to ask if OS X interface is "resolution independent". (It isn't.) Someday we'll have resolution independent graphics but it's not close by any means. Then the interface elements will be able to retain same proportions with minimal quality loss, no matter what the resolution is.



    Could you elaborate more on this? How OS X (or whatever OS) could adapt to other resolutions without (or with minimal) quality loss?
  • Reply 13 of 27
    satchmosatchmo Posts: 2,699member
    My dream machine would be this newly rumoured (MacRumors) PB which would have a 15.4" widescreen with a res of 1344 x 880.



    Throw in that Xbrite technology and Radeon 9700 graphics card and of course a G5 processor.



    Ready by fall 2004? Possible? I think so...but likely another speed bumped G4 rev first with the screen/card.
  • Reply 14 of 27
    jadejade Posts: 379member
    pass one over to me...it is the powerbook I have been waiting for for a while now.
  • Reply 15 of 27
    escherescher Posts: 1,811member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by satchmo

    That said, I'm hoping regardless of processor, that the next PB rev brings us a better display.



    Especially the 12-inch PowerBook is in dire need of an LCD with improved quality. The screen in the current 12-inch PB simply does not deserve the "Power" moniker.



    Quote:

    Originally posted by BNOYHTUAWB

    I'd rather take that decision myself than have Apple take it for me. I'd like a nice bright screen. I can always turn brightbess down if I'm running on battery. But if Apple from the start takes sh*tty screens, I cannot adjust!



    I couldn't have said it better than BNOYHTUAWB. Give me a super bright LCD, and let me turn down the brightness to extend batter life. (Duh!) And give me a 1.6Ghz 9nm G5 and let me run it at 1Ghz to extend battery life further.



    Escher
  • Reply 16 of 27
    escherescher Posts: 1,811member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    It would make more sense to ask if OS X interface is "resolution independent".



    That's an excellent point, Gon. Mac OS X's dock is a step in the right direction, since it is fully scaleable. Similarly, desktop icons are fully scaleable. Now we simply need to apply the same scaleability to the rest of the interface elements, e.g. the Menu bar, window widgets, etc.



    However, I fear that we will have to rely on crappy-looking interpolation for many more years.



    On a side-note, it's shocking how many people at work run our brand-new 1280x1024 LCD panels at 1024x768 or even 800x600. It just looks even worse when the interpolation is done by the LCD rather than by the CPU, e.g. when you change the resolution on your internal PowerBook screen. Yikes!



    Escher
  • Reply 17 of 27
    messiahtoshmessiahtosh Posts: 1,754member
    I think everyone can agree, the next major revision to the PB may be the one that gets bought in even more crazily high numbers. It is so exciting to think about a G5 or even high speed G4 in that enclosure, or a newer, better one. I am on the edge of my seat to see where this goes. I love notebooks.
  • Reply 18 of 27
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Escher

    ...Now we simply need to apply the same scaleability to the rest of the interface elements, e.g. the Menu bar, window widgets, etc.



    However, I fear that we will have to rely on crappy-looking interpolation for many more years.





    Why having a fully scaleable Dock is easy, while a fully scaleable interface so difficult?
  • Reply 19 of 27
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Messiahtosh

    I think everyone can agree, the next major revision to the PB may be the one that gets bought in even more crazily high numbers. It is so exciting to think about a G5 or even high speed G4 in that enclosure, or a newer, better one. I am on the edge of my seat to see where this goes. I love notebooks.



    So do I...



  • Reply 20 of 27
    Different take. All black back cover.

    Enjoy ! :-)







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