Is Sony Losing its Touch?

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  • Reply 21 of 23
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    I guess the minidisc has done pretty well in Japan, anybody think it has a future in the US? My sense is that it's storage envelope is being eclipsed by ram based devices on the one end and HD on the other.



    One thing I'll say about Sony, they'll just hang in there like grim death on a format whether anybody wants it or not.....
  • Reply 22 of 23
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by addabox

    I guess the minidisc has done pretty well in Japan, anybody think it has a future in the US? My sense is that it's storage envelope is being eclipsed by ram based devices on the one end and HD on the other.



    I was interested in MiniDisc for a short time after it came out, at least once my initial skepticism over lossy compression had been quelled. I've owned two different home MD recorders (actually, "own", present tense, but they're both stashed away and collecting dust -- should probably unload them on eBay), a portable player that came with one of those recorders, and I still have a interesting car stereo head unit that can accept both CDs and MDs through the same in-dash slot.



    What I most wanted MD for was making my own mixes to listen to in the car. I used to do the same thing with analog cassettes, but MD is much more durable, sounds better, and is much easier to edit than tape.



    But even if MD was easier and more flexible for me than tape, creating mixes with MD was still a time-consuming hassle. Each song had to be recorded in real-time, and even with a five-disc changer, I couldn't typically line up all of the music to make a particular mix in such a way that I could walk away and have everything done for me when I came back.



    Apart from the mechanics of the process, I also found the work of deciding what songs went best with what songs in what order a lot of work, starting with a long list of all of the songs that I wanted on some MD that I'd have with me in my car, checking songs off the list as I made my mixes, and then ending up with tougher and tougher decisions about how to assemble whatever was left.



    Once I had a particular mix done, it was nice to listen to for a while, but I'd find myself getting bored with the predictable sequences of my mixes. Shuffle play on a single disc's-worth of stuff hardly helps in my opinion.



    Once high-capacity MP3 players came along, I lost all interest in MD. Shuffle play is finally really useful to me, new mixes are trivially easy to create and modify, I can carry thousands of songs all inside my player without any excess baggage.



    Unless someone is already invested in MD and has lots of the media around, I can't see why anyone would bother with MD ever again.
  • Reply 23 of 23
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Yeah, that's pretty much what I figured. It's interesting that Sony couldn't make the disc creation process more streamline. It's easy to forget what we tolerated in terms of interface pre iPod.



    I know a few people who use MD as a cheap digital field recorder-- they can be had for as little as $100 and typically feature actual stereo line and mic inputs. But live recording MP3 type devices get cheaper every day and capacity just keeps going up, while MD remains fixed.
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