Revolt

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
That's right folks, I am staging my very own Property Tax Revolt in my community. Here's the situation:



You all know I'm a teacher. In my school system, taxes have not increased in 12 years. I believe the millage is around 15 (that's $15 in tax for every $1,000 for assessed property value).



In the district where I live, the schools are not terrific to say the least. Yet, we pay the highest taxes in the county, to the tune of 25.45 mills. For my home, that's $4,500 per year. Many in my neighborhood are paying $5,200 a year. Some are paying $8,000 in newly built communities. Average county (spelling edit--"county", not "country" for those posters who couldn't detect an obvious typo) millage is about 17-19.



Three days ago, we found out the the district wants to raise taxes...wait for it....23.6% for next year. Do the math. Much of this is to cover a deficit that was discovered three years ago (the operating fund balance), and previous financial "crookery". I say again...our taxes are already the highest in the county.



As a teacher, I obviously support funding education. However, due to our LYING GOVERNOR, no alternative plan to fund education has been presented. He campaigned on property tax reform. Now our taxes are going to surpass $500 per month. Where does it end? How much is enough? Last year, we had a 13% increase. We swallowed it in the hopes that will all the new development and revenue from it, things would improve.



Well...I'll tell you where ends. It ends here. This weekend was spent contacting the media, local and state officials, etc. We handed out over 700 flyers for residents to attend the board meetings this week. We contacted the Governor, Auditor General, State Senators and Reps, etc. We are going to war. The fiscal mismanagement must stop. If we don't get involved, our rate will go to 31 mills. I already pay 10% of my salary to the local school board.



So that's the story. We're going for maximum impact. Residents are outraged and are going to flood the meetings in the next two days. Can I post on AI from jail? Maybe if you're local you'll see me on the news.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    billybobskybillybobsky Posts: 1,914member
    Email rendell...



    Seriously, this is a local issue that needs to be voiced higher up...



    Perhaps you can suggest other ways to raise funds...





    Seriously though, take the issue to the governor himself...
  • Reply 2 of 10
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    Is this a county tax?
  • Reply 3 of 10
    smirclesmircle Posts: 1,035member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by SDW2001

    That's right folks, I am staging my very own Property Tax Revolt in my community.



    Would you like some tea with this revolt, Sir?
  • Reply 4 of 10
    Quote:

    Originally posted by SDW2001

    You all know I'm a teacher. In my school system, taxes have not increased in 12 years. I believe the millage is around 15 (that's $15 in tax for every $1,000 for assessed property value).



    In the district where I live, the schools are not terrific to say the least. Yet, we pay the highest taxes in the county, to the tune of 25.45 mills. For my home, that's $4,500 per year. Many in my neighborhood are paying $5,200 a year. Some are paying $8,000 in newly built communities. Average country millage is about 17-19.





    I realize you are in full-on campaign mode, but is that paragraph intended to be misleading?



    You mention nothing about the quality of the schools in the first district, you're vague about the actual tax rate in both and then spend lots of time (and outrage) on *total* tax raised for your own district and home, which without more info tells us nothing, and to be honest I still can't work out if you've actually stated what your tax rate is. You say what the average *country* millage is, did you mean for your county?
  • Reply 5 of 10
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Good for you SDW. Give 'em 'ell. The property tax ed funding model is unfair anyway. It ought to be just based on general state revenues, rather than localities.
  • Reply 6 of 10
    chinneychinney Posts: 1,019member
    Those engaged in ?tax revolt? initiatives should indicate clearly where they would make up the revenue that would be forgone: should other types of tax be increased; if so, which ones? Should spending be decreased; if so, which spending should be targeted? Should greater efficiency be achieved in current government programs: if so, how?



    Tax revolt initiatives can be a valid expression of democratic will. However, governing is a complex matter and the debates on single issue initiatives often fail to capture competing policy choices. Presented as a single-issue, people have a tendency to vote for lower taxes. On the other hand, they will also tend to vote for government spending that they perceive as benefiting them. Sometimes, they vote both ways at the same time, leading to substantial deficits which, one way or another, will someday have to be paid.



    For these reasons, I am generally suspicious of the usefulness of single-issue tax initiatives. I think that they are only useful in cases where a particular type of tax has come to have a disproportionate negative effect on the economy, and on particular groups, such that increasing or maintaining that tax should clearly be the last policy choice: i.e., it is time to force the government to do something ? anything ? else.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,937member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Chinney

    Those engaged in ?tax revolt? initiatives should indicate clearly where they would make up the revenue that would be forgone: should other types of tax be increased; if so, which ones? Should spending be decreased; if so, which spending should be targeted? Should greater efficiency be achieved in current government programs: if so, how?



    Tax revolt initiatives can be a valid expression of democratic will. However, governing is a complex matter and the debates on single issue initiatives often fail to capture competing policy choices. Presented as a single-issue, people have a tendency to vote for lower taxes. On the other hand, they will also tend to vote for government spending that they perceive as benefiting them. Sometimes, they vote both ways at the same time, leading to substantial deficits which, one way or another, will someday have to be paid.



    For these reasons, I am generally suspicious of the usefulness of single-issue tax initiatives. I think that they are only useful in cases where a particular type of tax has come to have a disproportionate negative effect on the economy, and on particular groups, such that increasing or maintaining that tax should clearly be the last policy choice: i.e., it is time to force the government to do something ? anything ? else.






    There is a lot more to the story. There is huge administrative waste and previous corruption in the system. It's not a revenue problem...it's a spending problem. I can't elaborate right now....but I will.
  • Reply 8 of 10
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,937member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by stupider...likeafox

    I realize you are in full-on campaign mode, but is that paragraph intended to be misleading?



    You mention nothing about the quality of the schools in the first district, you're vague about the actual tax rate in both and then spend lots of time (and outrage) on *total* tax raised for your own district and home, which without more info tells us nothing, and to be honest I still can't work out if you've actually stated what your tax rate is. You say what the average *country* millage is, did you mean for your county?




    Yes, it's intended to be misleading. Shut up.



    My tax rate is 25.45 mills. They are proposing that it goes to 31.45 mills. The first district (my employer) is fiscally solvent with decent ratings. My home district is not doing well financially due to waste and corruption. Taxes have nearly doubled in the last four years. "Country" was a typo, but honestly, are you not intelligent enough to figure that out?



    We won round one. The budget was narrowly defeated by the board after a massive public outcry. Hundreds of people showed up at the May 17 finance committee meeting and subsequent public vote on the 18th. They must now present another budget. We've gone to Governor, State Senators, Representatives, Auditor General, Dept. of Education, local and regional media. We've gotten almost 1,000 petition signatures that are faxed every day to the above. We're just getting organized now.



    I spoke at two meetings and received standing ovations from the community. We're now pursuing legal action. When I have more time, I'll detail the waste and corruption here.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by SDW2001

    I spoke at two meetings and received standing ovations from the community.



    Cool, SDW is becoming an activist! Here's a picture of him in action:





    And now maybe you can do something about the federal budget they're trying to pass right now.
  • Reply 10 of 10
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,937member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BRussell

    Cool, SDW is becoming an activist! Here's a picture of him in action:





    And now maybe you can do something about the federal budget they're trying to pass right now.




    One thing at a time.
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