Credibility Gap

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Sadly, I think that's more true on the Mac side than the PC side - the poor Windows folks still have software that makes those tasks more difficult than they need to be, in general, and they're more likely to be the email/web/text editing people simply because they can't figure out how to do anything more advanced. iLife OTOH makes it easy, therefore proportionally more users will actually use the power at their disposal.



    Ironic, ain't it?



    But, on the flip side, I do everything but the video editing on a 350MHz G3, and find it *adequate*. It's not fast, it's not snappy, but it does the job, and still does it well. I also have a 1.25GHz G4, and find that to be simply wonderful for everything I've thrown at it, including a small amount of video editing. If I did it professionally, I'd certainly want the latest and fastest, but for occasional use? Average consumers simply don't need that kind of power, it's wasted on anything lesser. (Well maybe not Word, that's such a resource hog anyway... )
  • Reply 22 of 35
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Kickaha

    Sadly, I think that's more true on the Mac side than the PC side - the poor Windows folks still have software that makes those tasks more difficult than they need to be, in general, and they're more likely to be the email/web/text editing people simply because they can't figure out how to do anything more advanced. iLife OTOH makes it easy, therefore proportionally more users will actually use the power at their disposal.



    Ironic, ain't it?




    wow, it is so true, and so damnd sad,



    note to apple, iLife for windows at $99.99 and bundle a demo or lite edition on new HP computers...
  • Reply 23 of 35
    chris cuillachris cuilla Posts: 4,825member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by a_greer

    Well, I disagree, 5 years ago, most people, basic home users, were only doing email and some web surfing, but now people are compressing their home music librarys for the iPod, and Itunes, and <$300 digital cameras have made digital photography a reality for the home user, and video is comeing along quickly, and imho, in 5 years home users will be doing HD on the home desktop.



    As the consumers use changes the cpu, ram, hdd, and os need to keep up, thus MHZ still matter.




    Okay. Fair enough. But there isn't a Mac you can buy today that won't do these things quite well. Sure a Dual 2.5GHz G5 PowerMac will do them faster than an eMac. But an eMac can do it just fine.



    I guess I think that people get caught up on "performance" way too much, which isn't bad in an of itself except for that fact that they boil it down to some simplistic metric...dollars-to-GHz or something like that. To me "power" is about what I can get done in a given day. Sometimes that is about GHz. More often it's about stability, integration, ease-of-use, software quality (i.e., no "blue screen of death" or "DLL hell" or "suddenly my printer driver doesn't work because, well, I updated IE!" kind of crap.)



    Oh well, just my $0.02 (after taxes and inflation).
  • Reply 24 of 35
    jadejade Posts: 379member
    I love how everytime someone mentions price and performance, it turns into a discussion about why OS X is better than Windows.



    For me the point of this thread is the effect Apple under delivering will have on potential customers. Apple has very significant market share challenges, and there are many issues affecting Apple's low sales. When customers cannot trust Apple to keep their promises, will they purchase something else?



    Of course we can argue all day about whether or not the people drinking the koolaid are brainwashed, but Apple can't rely on the koolaid drinkers alone.



    What happens to Apple's sales when they can't deliver new products in qunatity, when customers hold off on their purchases pending imminent revisions that never happen, or when Advertising councils refute Apple's performance benchmarks?



    For many of Apple's key customer targets, blind faith isn't enough.
  • Reply 25 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Chris Cuilla



    I guess I think that people get caught up on "performance" way too much, which isn't bad in an of itself except for that fact that they boil it down to some simplistic metric...dollars-to-GHz or something like that. To me "power" is about what I can get done in a given day. Sometimes that is about GHz. More often it's about stability, integration, ease-of-use, software quality (i.e., no "blue screen of death" or "DLL hell" or "suddenly my printer driver doesn't work because, well, I updated IE!" kind of crap.)





    Amen brother. Last week at work I had MS project installed and poof, my MS Office toolbar disappeared and the Taskbar won't autohide anymore. Small things do make a difference. Boy was I missing my outdated 550 MHZ TiPB.
  • Reply 26 of 35
    chris cuillachris cuilla Posts: 4,825member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by jade

    For me the point of this thread is the effect Apple under delivering will have on potential customers...When customers cannot trust Apple to keep their promises, will they purchase something else?



    Hasn't seemed to affect MS much.



  • Reply 27 of 35
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,431member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mac Voyer

    That is always the last refuge of the Mac hardware defender isn't it? It just doesn't matter what the hardware comparison is. The other guys don't have Mac OS X. Apple could offer some of you a calculator for $3000 and you would say it was a better value over a dual 5 GHz PC because the Apple product was running OS X. That argument is only good for those who drink the Kool Aid. How many years has it been since a PC desktop was offered in the 1 GHz range? How many years has it been since a budget/consumer PC desktop was offered in the $1500 to $2000 range? Why does it seem Apple intentionally puts in half the graphics ram and 2/3 the HD of the PC? Is there also a graphics myth and an HD myth? They would have a better argument for their processors if other components were kept up to speed with the rest of the industry. But as long as it runs a Mac OS, then what does it matter? Why do some of us seem to harp so much on hardware equivalency? Hint, Apple is a hardware company! No amount of software can change that.



    What you call "refuge" I call the truth. Mac user enjoy the program for it's OS. We love the consistency and care that go into the average Mac application. We realize that although UI changes aren't as sexy as adding 100mhz the perceived speed is much faster. Apple is not a hardware company, they've always been distinguished by their software. Anyone telling you otherwise really doesn't know the platform.



    Everytime you hear someone complain about eMacs and their relative value to a PC they are, as Kickaha mentions, boiling everything down to one metric. Generally these people don't understand much about computers and feel better for about themselves by simplifying things.



    There is nothing that i'm missing out on by purchasing an emac that i'm gaining by buying a PC. Err well I would be sidestepping beacoup viruses and the like
  • Reply 28 of 35
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Credible or not, Apple better hurry and inovate something because it looks like M$ is catching up...
  • Reply 29 of 35
    the cool gutthe cool gut Posts: 1,714member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by jade



    What happens to Apple's sales when they can't deliver new products in qunatity, when customers hold off on their purchases pending imminent revisions that never happen, or when Advertising councils refute Apple's performance benchmarks?




    As far as availability goes, this is a problem with ALL manufacturers. It doesn't matter if its a Playstation 2 or a Tickle-Me-Elmo doll. Everyone has the same problems with supply and demand.
  • Reply 30 of 35
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by the cool gut

    As far as availability goes, this is a problem with ALL manufacturers. It doesn't matter if its a Playstation 2 or a Tickle-Me-Elmo doll. Everyone has the same problems with supply and demand.



    yes, that is econ 101, but how can apple be loosing market share faster than the Bears loose the playoffs and STILL under project market demand so drasticly?
  • Reply 31 of 35
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,431member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by the cool gut

    As far as availability goes, this is a problem with ALL manufacturers. It doesn't matter if its a Playstation 2 or a Tickle-Me-Elmo doll. Everyone has the same problems with supply and demand.



    Having supply and demand issues is preferrable. In fact wallstreet seems to actually increase your rating when this happens. It's when supply catches up to demand that things change. They often say

    "it's better to have and empty warehouse with lots of backorders than a full warehouse with no order"



    LOL Apple has the largest collection of Fortune 500 Armchair CEO on the planet. Every one is convinced they know what's best for Apple.
  • Reply 32 of 35
    People want more than what they need, it's not exclusive to the computer world.



    Examples? Many.



    -Penis enlargement pills.

    -Cars that can hit 300km/h.
  • Reply 33 of 35
    talksense101talksense101 Posts: 1,738member
    The only problem with Apple is that they don't acknowledge problems and deal with it. The iBook faults and the security bugs are the latest examples. This makes Apple look like a bunch of arrogant kids. However, I don't think any of the originally quoted three examples are an issue. Their product designs continue to lead the market.
  • Reply 34 of 35
    jadejade Posts: 379member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by a_greer

    Credible or not, Apple better hurry and inovate something because it looks like M$ is catching up...



    I didn't think Microsoft got very far on their branded computers
  • Reply 35 of 35
    chris cuillachris cuilla Posts: 4,825member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by talksense101

    The only problem with Apple is that they don't acknowledge problems and deal with it. The iBook faults and the security bugs are the latest examples. This makes Apple look like a bunch of arrogant kids.



    This is baloney. I'm sorry, but they seem to be pretty prompt in responding to security issues. You have to remember, when something like that is reported, they have to verify it, then they have to figure out exactly what's causing it, fix it and test it (probably in variety of ways on a variety of configurations.) They have actually been pretty good with this.



    Regarding the iBook issue, I cannot really comment, but I would say don't necessarily go by what you hear on boards like this. These are atypical audiences. I don't know that a) it was a widespread problem, and b) that Apple didn't make good on fixing it as quickly as they could.



    I'm not trying to be an Apple apologist, but cut them a little break. I don't really think Apple is deliberately trying to screw people (I could be wrong). And they are human so they screw up (I know I'm not wrong about that).
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