So what would an Apple SmartPhone be like?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
People around here have mentioned the SmartPhone market as the next big Apple thing. What kind of SmartPhone would Apple make?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
  • Reply 2 of 21
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,145member
    It would have a 16bit color screen.

    Qwerty keyboard

    16:9 in screen.

    2GB of flash memory for storage. 64MB RAM

    Support Quicktime 7

    Bluetooth and BT headset included

    iTMS support (iTMS 5 to have downloadable ringtones)

    Safari mini for web access mail mini for email.

    It'll come in a choice of 5 designer colors.
  • Reply 3 of 21
    Why Flash Memory?

    Just stick a 1.8 inch Hard Drive in it.
  • Reply 4 of 21
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,145member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by isomething

    Why Flash Memory?

    Just stick a 1.8 inch Hard Drive in it.




    Because flash memory is easier on the battery and I think Apple will eventually support HE-AAC so that you can load up twice as many songs. 2GB is HUGE. How much data would the typical person carry around?
  • Reply 5 of 21
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    Because flash memory is easier on the battery and I think Apple will eventually support HE-AAC so that you can load up twice as many songs. 2GB is HUGE. How much data would the typical person carry around?



    I suppose your right, but, I remember not to long ago hen people were laughing about Apple's MP3 Player that held 1,000 songs.
  • Reply 6 of 21
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    it would be wonderful....
  • Reply 7 of 21
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,145member
    I look at the Smartphone as a device that should do a little of everything. Make great phone calls, play a little music when you want enable some wireless web and store your data.



    Apple could add in a camera and iPhoto access. This phone would really take off once people saw how easy using the sync features of Tiger is.



    Imagine jacking this sucker into your car stereo and listening to music...you get a call and the phone instantly pauses the music and goes into hands free mode.
  • Reply 8 of 21
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    I look at the Smartphone as a device that should do a little of everything. Make great phone calls, play a little music when you want enable some wireless web and store your data.



    Apple could add in a camera and iPhoto access. This phone would really take off once people saw how easy using the sync features of Tiger is.



    Imagine jacking this sucker into your car stereo and listening to music...you get a call and the phone instantly pauses the music and goes into hands free mode.




    That would kick ass!
  • Reply 9 of 21
    My company looked a hard drives in phones... Drop tests are expensive!
  • Reply 10 of 21
    Apps that it would have versions of:



    Safari=surf the net anywhere

    Mail=send messages anywhere

    iTunes=Listen to your 100 most played songs

    Quicktime=Watch videos on your phone

    iPhoto=for a built in camera of course

    iCal=Organize your Schedule

    Address Book=organize your contacts

    iChat=IM with anyone on AOL or .Mac

    iSync=sync it with iPod to access songs and info you have stored on it!

    Keynote=connect it to a projector and you all set

    Calculator=duh!

    Sound Studio=to make audio notes

    NotePad=make quick Documents, to do lists, reminders



    That's all I could think of.
  • Reply 11 of 21
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by GreggWSmith

    My company looked a hard drives in phones... Drop tests are expensive!



    I've dropped my iBook more than my cellphone.



    As a consumer (and a poor one at that) I'm pretty comfortable with the concept of "if I drop my HDD cellphone, it might break".
  • Reply 12 of 21
    If apple made a phone I would have to eat it.
  • Reply 13 of 21
    Quote:

    Originally posted by NEMESIS

    If apple made a phone I would have to eat it.



    This might happen sooner than you think!







    Freescale ARM11 (MXC) Extreme Convergence



    Signed,Sealed, Delivered: Freescale Semiconductor Delivers Postage Stamp-Sized, Revolutionary Technology



    1 February 2005, 07:00am ET



    Mobile Extreme Convergence is Here; Sampling With Customers Smaller, more powerful, scalable, highly efficient ... and real.



    Making good on its promise in October 2003, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. is successfully sampling the revolutionary Mobile Extreme Convergence architecture with Motorola, Inc., one of the top two handset manufacturers in the world.



    The size of a postage stamp, Mobile Extreme Convergence (MXC) is designed to significantly reduce the materials and development effort required to deliver mid- and high-tier mobile devices. Designed to be inserted in an existing footprint, MXC allows developers to use a single platform to target multiple product designs currently delivered through as many as 300-400 components.



    This single platform could equip virtually any product -- an MP3 player, a handheld DVD player, a digital camera -- to become a fully functional smart mobile cellular device.



    MXC-enabled devices will use considerably less memory through a shared memory approach and optimized cache environment. This, coupled with the first combined single core modem (SCM) and high performance applications processor on a single 90nm IC, results in up to 70 percent performance gain and 50 percent lower power over current dual-core implementations.



    MXC is the first wireless platform with L2 cache allowing faster processing speed, higher performance and reduced power consumption by minimizing the external memory bus accesses. With MXC, smart mobile devices will be able to run longer on standard batteries, increasing the utility and entertainment time for customers.



    "Key to the innovation, Freescale cleanly separates the hardware needed to drive call processing technology and application processing in a miniature package," said Franz Fink, senior vice president and general manager of Freescale's wireless business. "Not only does this integration lower the chipset cost for our customers by at least 30 percent, it also eliminates the need for a stand-alone applications processor."



    This integration creates design space for a host of new connectivity modules and applications such as WLAN, GPS, ZigBee(TM), Bluetooth(TM), WiMAX or Ultra-Wideband mobile technologies. On-board security solutions help protect consumers and enable widespread access to anywhere, anytime downloads like video files and mobile commerce transactions.



    The MXC275-30 platform, the first instantiation of the MXC architecture, is a comprehensive, integrated Single Core Modem GSM Edge solution featuring:



    -- ARM(R) ARM1136JF-S MCU @ 532 MHz, StarCore(R) SC140e DSP @

    208 MHz.



    -- Cutting edge modem features: EGPRS Class 12/GPRS Class 12 with

    simultaneous voice and data covering the 850/900/1800/1900 MHz

    bands.



    -- Advanced Multimedia and graphics support include up to CIF

    30fps MPEG4/H.264 Video Streaming Image Capture.



    -- Enhanced security architecture is designed to prevent user

    identity theft, provide SIM-locks, program and data integrity

    and hardware features to support for digital rights

    management.



    -- Advanced Power Reduction Architecture.



    -- Transceiver with direct conversion RF receiver and polar

    modulated direct digital conversion transmitter including an

    analog front end solution and PA module.



    -- Advanced power management includes stereo DAC and Touch panel

    interface.



    -- Open OS, PSAPI (platform services API), Single Core Modem SW.



    The MXC275-30 platform is sampling with alpha customers and will be production-ready by the end of 2005. MXC-enabled products could be shipping by early 2006.



    For more information, please visit our website: www.freescale.com/mxc
  • Reply 14 of 21
    Hypothetically, we could all just save time and ask Harald.
  • Reply 15 of 21
    Quote:

    Hypothetically, we could all just save time



    word dude...
  • Reply 16 of 21
    haraldharald Posts: 2,152member
    It would be sexy, designed well and integrate with iLife.



    Not rocket science, I would suggest.



  • Reply 17 of 21
    slugheadslughead Posts: 1,169member
    This is sort of off topic, but why hasn't anyone released a device with flash memory in raid-0?



    Seems like this would solve the problem of read/write time, especially for an mp3 player (which holds lots of data).



    So you get the speed advantage of a hard drive with the advantages of flash (no skipping, lower power consumption, etc).
  • Reply 18 of 21
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,145member
    Quote:

    This is sort of off topic, but why hasn't anyone released a device with flash memory in raid-0?



    Because it's more appropriately named AID 0. There's no redundancy which isn't good storing your data.



    The higher quality flash memory writes at 7MBps so I doubt that the need for any special setups would exist beyond spending more for the quality flash memory.
  • Reply 19 of 21
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Harald





    Not rocket science, I would suggest.







    duh
  • Reply 20 of 21
    I tell you, if apple releace a SmartPhone i'll replace my One that day.
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