iTMS should have a subscription service

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 25
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by shetline

    The downside is even worse DRM (Digital Rights Management) than we currently have to deal with.



    Yeah that's a good point - the DRM would have to be more invasive. How do the current subscription services work? Do the tracks just expire after a certain amount of time?



    But since Apple fully controls both the iPod and the music store, I'd think they'd be able to come up with a less-intrusive way of doing things.
  • Reply 22 of 25
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BRussell

    Yeah that's a good point - the DRM would have to be more invasive. How do the current subscription services work? Do the tracks just expire after a certain amount of time?



    Yes. Your computer has to "phone home" at least once per month to keep your "tethered downloads" playing, and your portable player has to plug into your computer at least once per month to keep its contents playing.

    Quote:

    But since Apple fully controls both the iPod and the music store, I'd think they'd be able to come up with a less-intrusive way of doing things.



    I doubt there is a less-intrusive way.



    Apple's current DRM has been cracked. It's not such a biggie, however, because Apple has still been paid for every track downloaded, whether or not someone has stripped off the DRM later, and iTunes music floating out there in the world stripped of DRM can hardly make any difference amid all of the pirated MP3s ripped from CD available online.



    Maybe it's just wishful thinking, but I bet Apple would rather have skipped DRM completely if it hadn't been necessary for getting the cooperation of the record labels.



    With subscription services that allow you to download thousands of songs per month for a small fixed price like $15 -- that's a major loss if someone breaks the DRM. The pay-per-download side of such a subscription service, where you pay $0.99 or whatever for non-expiring versions of the songs you decide you like well enough to keep, would suffer greatly unless strict DRM enforcement is maintained.
  • Reply 23 of 25
    I already heard somewhere that Napster's DRM for streamed music was broken. So now those who can google up the instructions can download all they want for $15, remove the DRM from the music, then cancel the subscription. How long do you think Napster will survive like this?
  • Reply 24 of 25
    The DRM wasn't broken. The process is the equivalent of using Audio Hijack while playing an iTMS file. The big difference is that with iTMS, you would've already bought the file before stripping the DRM.



    This may be Microsoft's way of taking down Apple - they have purposefully created a system that encourages piracy. With Napster, you can steal all the music you want for $15. With Apple, you have to pay for each song whether you remove the DRM or not. You can bet that MS will significantly alter their DRM once they've driven Apple out of business.
  • Reply 25 of 25
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Texas Flood

    This may be Microsoft's way of taking down Apple - they have purposefully created a system that encourages piracy. With Napster, you can steal all the music you want for $15. With Apple, you have to pay for each song whether you remove the DRM or not. You can bet that MS will significantly alter their DRM once they've driven Apple out of business.



    People stealing piles of music for $15/month from Napster will be a whole lot more effective at putting Napster out of business than putting Apple out of business.



    For all of the hassle and variable quality of P2P, it is still, however, significantly more convenient that recording real-time streams of music. P2P can also often be better quality than subjecting bulky, high-bandwidth, post-decompression audio streams to a sound-quality-reducing second generation of lossy compression. If P2P hasn't put Apple out of the music business, Napster-nabbing isn't going to cause Apple much grief either.



    It seems almost inevitable, however, that someone will sooner or later crack Napster's MS/Janus DRM, and they'll be able to quickly, with no loss of sound quality, get piles of Napster's music nearly for free. I still think that'll hurt Napster more than Apple.
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