Apple advertising Mac OS X in TIME magazine (images)

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 47
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    well, i agree that apple should ship all its new computers with 512mb as soon as possible..



    i also agree that apple charges what i personally feel to be an unreasonable premium for its' ram.



  • Reply 42 of 47
    aecheylonaecheylon Posts: 19member
    Regarding the ad, the version I saw today in the New Yorker has a typo. Look closely at the Spotlight search results window: notice the right column says "When" (correct) and then "When" again where is should say "Where." Lemme know if you want a "screen shot." Haven't seen it in other magazines, so don't know if this is true for every one of these ads.
  • Reply 43 of 47
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by aecheylon

    Regarding the ad, the version I saw today in the New Yorker has a typo. Look closely at the Spotlight search results window: notice the right column says "When" (correct) and then "When" again where is should say "Where." Lemme know if you want a "screen shot." Haven't seen it in other magazines, so don't know if this is true for every one of these ads.



    screenshot.. !! please
  • Reply 44 of 47
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,983member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by sunilraman

    well, i agree that apple should ship all its new computers with 512mb as soon as possible..



    i also agree that apple charges what i personally feel to be an unreasonable premium for its' ram.







    Well, as I said, they all do.



    A little story;



    Years ago, when I purchased my HP CLJ 8500N, I wanted to get more RAM for it. I called Hp and asked if I should get theirs (at the time a stick of 64MB from them cost $600, vs $275 outside.)



    I was told that I shouldn't. He said that they sold RAM into corporations who wanted to be ensured that the RAM worked, was included in the warranty, and didn't require them to open the machine and do the install. I was told that for them, the extra cost was worth it, but that I should just go out and buy it, as they were standard 60ns parts.



    It's the same thing with Apple and others. If you buy from Apple, you have peace of mind. If you are a corporation or a school, you save the time (which is money) installing it yourself. And you know it meets specs. As Apple has lowered the price, it no longer is out of line with what other manufacturers charge.
  • Reply 45 of 47
    junkyard dawgjunkyard dawg Posts: 2,801member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by melgross

    He said that they sold RAM into corporations who wanted to be ensured that the RAM worked, was included in the warranty, and didn't require them to open the machine and do the install. I was told that for them, the extra cost was worth it, but that I should just go out and buy it, as they were standard 60ns parts.



    I bought my RAM from Crucial. It came with a warranty, so I had peace of mind. It was exactly the same as the RAM my system came with, so I knew it would "just work". I did have to install it, which meant I had to crack my Sawtooth case, slip the RAM sticks into the RAM slots (and not those bigger PCI slots!), and then close the case. This was very challenging but since I regularly surmount impossibly huge obstacles, I knew I could do it. I rebooted my Mac and it worked. All that was left to do was get a beer.



    Most corporations have IT departments, and it would be cheaper for them to pay some grunt minimum wage to go around sticking aftermarket RAM into computers. In fact this is what many corporations do. Last week at a national insurance company, the management paid to upgrade everyone's computers with new HDs, RAM, and optical drives. It took a few IT geeks, but by doing a department at a time, they got it done right and saved a ton of dough.



    IMO it would be the home consumers who can't handle the upgrades. Most people are computer illiterate and are completely terrified of opening a case to do any sort of tinkering at all. Many of my family members regularly take their Wintels in to Best Buy to have them purged of viruses and malware, because they don't know how to do it themselves. If you figure the average IQ is 100, and it takes an IQ of 110 to service one's own computer, then that's over one-half of the population that is too stupid to add RAM themselves. These are the folks who will buy a Mini and then throw it away for a Wintel within a year because it's "too slow". Apple is unwise not to sell the Mini configured for use by these troglodytes.
  • Reply 46 of 47
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,983member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Junkyard Dawg

    I bought my RAM from Crucial. It came with a warranty, so I had peace of mind. It was exactly the same as the RAM my system came with, so I knew it would "just work". I did have to install it, which meant I had to crack my Sawtooth case, slip the RAM sticks into the RAM slots (and not those bigger PCI slots!), and then close the case. This was very challenging but since I regularly surmount impossibly huge obstacles, I knew I could do it. I rebooted my Mac and it worked. All that was left to do was get a beer.



    Most corporations have IT departments, and it would be cheaper for them to pay some grunt minimum wage to go around sticking aftermarket RAM into computers. In fact this is what many corporations do. Last week at a national insurance company, the management paid to upgrade everyone's computers with new HDs, RAM, and optical drives. It took a few IT geeks, but by doing a department at a time, they got it done right and saved a ton of dough.



    IMO it would be the home consumers who can't handle the upgrades. Most people are computer illiterate and are completely terrified of opening a case to do any sort of tinkering at all. Many of my family members regularly take their Wintels in to Best Buy to have them purged of viruses and malware, because they don't know how to do it themselves. If you figure the average IQ is 100, and it takes an IQ of 110 to service one's own computer, then that's over one-half of the population that is too stupid to add RAM themselves. These are the folks who will buy a Mini and then throw it away for a Wintel within a year because it's "too slow". Apple is unwise not to sell the Mini configured for use by these troglodytes.




    It wasn't my argument, but Hp's. Most companies buy computers configured the way they need them. They don't go out right away and add RAM, Hd's etc. They might do that later. But the truth is, most don't do even that. Once the machines are considered to be unworthy of their users, they are either sent down the line, and replaced with new machines, or simply disgarded, sold off, or donated.



    True about consumers. Most never upgrade their machines either. I can tell you about dozens of friends over the years who just "had" to get a six or eight slot PC, and then never added anything to it. It's just the idea that they *might*.
  • Reply 47 of 47
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Junkyard Dawg

    I bought my RAM from Crucial. It came with a warranty, so I had peace of mind. It was exactly the same as the RAM my system came with, so I knew it would "just work". I did have to install it, which meant I had to crack my Sawtooth case, slip the RAM sticks into the RAM slots (and not those bigger PCI slots!), and then close the case. This was very challenging but since I regularly surmount impossibly huge obstacles, I knew I could do it. I rebooted my Mac and it worked. All that was left to do was get a beer.



    Most corporations have IT departments, and it would be cheaper for them to pay some grunt minimum wage to go around sticking aftermarket RAM into computers. In fact this is what many corporations do. Last week at a national insurance company, the management paid to upgrade everyone's computers with new HDs, RAM, and optical drives. It took a few IT geeks, but by doing a department at a time, they got it done right and saved a ton of dough.



    IMO it would be the home consumers who can't handle the upgrades. Most people are computer illiterate and are completely terrified of opening a case to do any sort of tinkering at all. Many of my family members regularly take their Wintels in to Best Buy to have them purged of viruses and malware, because they don't know how to do it themselves. If you figure the average IQ is 100, and it takes an IQ of 110 to service one's own computer, then that's over one-half of the population that is too stupid to add RAM themselves. These are the folks who will buy a Mini and then throw it away for a Wintel within a year because it's "too slow". Apple is unwise not to sell the Mini configured for use by these troglodytes.




    ROFLMAO. 10 out of 10 for satire + sarcasm + sniper-quality use of the word 'troglodyte'... hmm i tested an iQ of 120 when i was 10 years old or so... since then, i have been into some sex, drugs and rock and roll (i'm 26 now) so one day i might slip back into using Wintel POSs



    edit:

    urmmm.... said sex, drugs and rock&roll mainly happened after i turned 18
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