Longhorn = WindowsVista vs. Apple's codename?

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
For those of you who didn't see longhorn is now officially WindowsVista

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/p...07-22LHMA.mspx



I took the liberty of "fixing" their logo:



«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    ipodandimacipodandimac Posts: 3,273member
    i'm glad MS is spending more time finding a name for the "new" OS rather than actually working on it. And who actually attended this press conference?
  • Reply 2 of 35
    ¡Hasta la vista! ¡Ay, que curiosidad!



    Edit: ¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!¡!
  • Reply 3 of 35
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ipodandimac

    i'm glad MS is spending more time finding a name for the "new" OS rather than actually working on it.



    What are you talking about? Developers will get the, ahem, first beta...soon...sometime...probably.
  • Reply 4 of 35
    gene cleangene clean Posts: 3,481member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by CosmoNut

    What are you talking about? Developers will get the, ahem, first beta...soon...sometime...probably.



    August 3rd and quite a few people attended. Follow the link, there's a link to the video where you can see the developers.
  • Reply 5 of 35
    andersanders Posts: 6,523member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by webmail

    [B]For those of you who didn't see longhorn is now officially WindowsVista

    http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/p...07-22LHMA.mspx



    Do you have to be fat and dance on stage to be a MS executive these days?
  • Reply 6 of 35
    stustanleystustanley Posts: 236member
    Quote:

    Do you have to be fat and dance on stage to be a MS executive these days?



    ROFLOL



    Remembered the video of the windows exec that was jumping around on stage yelling "Developers, developers, Developers"



    You all know the one i mean



    stu



    edit: just looked at the video clip on the windows site. WMV sucks next to H264 doesnt it?
  • Reply 7 of 35
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    This one?



  • Reply 8 of 35
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    Vista- From a long way off it looks like it works!



  • Reply 9 of 35
    mynameheremynamehere Posts: 560member
    That's too bad...I kinda liked "Longhorn"...as in "the entire OS is Bull-"
  • Reply 10 of 35
    Bringing clarity to your world



    should officially be changed to:



    Bringing a new round of viruses, spyware, security holes, and bugs to your world... eventually. Oh, and you'll pay for it too. Did we forget to mention we stripped most of the features out of the OS which made it an upgrade to XP?
  • Reply 11 of 35
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Most people who use Windows would be hard pressed to tell 98, 2000 and XP apart. Name doesn't matter. It's Windows and they're going to buy it because they always have. \
  • Reply 12 of 35
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    Most people who use Windows would be hard pressed to tell 98, 2000 and XP apart. Name doesn't matter. It's Windows and they're going to buy it because they always have. \



    Yeah, and with 90-some percent of the marketshare, Microsoft knows they can't ask all their users to adopt an OS that's drastically different. That would be like asking typists to migrate away from the QWERTY keyboard.



    So we'll still see the Start menu, task bar, Recycle bin, blah, blah, blah.
  • Reply 13 of 35
    Many people, especially younger kids, haven't grown up with the level of competition and interchangeability that we have in certain areas. These people tend not to think of Windows as a product separate from the computer. They started using computers when Microsoft had dominated the market. They started using the Internet after the web had matured and taken on the role of an e-mail client and numerous other services. They started using the web after Netscape was knocked out. They started using IM after MSN Messenger became prominent. Since they haven't experienced many different configurations in computing, very separate and interchangeable elements of computing appear as one. Since it Windows appears to comprise their entire computing experience, it's virtually one with the computer. I think it's possible that many people will continue to upgrade Windows as they would upgrade other critical components of their computer. Add some RAM, get a DVD burner, get a new Windows, get a new hard drive, etc.
  • Reply 14 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mac The Fork

    Many people, especially younger kids, haven't grown up with the level of competition and interchangeability that we have in certain areas. These people tend not to think of Windows as a product separate from the computer. They started using computers when Microsoft had dominated the market. They started using the Internet after the web had matured and taken on the role of an e-mail client and numerous other services. They started using the web after Netscape was knocked out. They started using IM after MSN Messenger became prominent. Since they haven't experienced many different configurations in computing, very separate and interchangeable elements of computing appear as one. Since it Windows appears to comprise their entire computing experience, it's virtually one with the computer. I think it's possible that many people will continue to upgrade Windows as they would upgrade other critical components of their computer. Add some RAM, get a DVD burner, get a new Windows, get a new hard drive, etc.



    Speak for yourself...

    I think the people most "at risk" shall we say are the older, less tech-savvy people who wouldn't know how to install (or think they wouldn't know) anything else other than Windows.
  • Reply 15 of 35
    Quote:

    Speak for yourself...

    I think the people most "at risk" shall we say are the older, less tech-savvy people who wouldn't know how to install (or think they wouldn't know) anything else other than Windows.



    I made the point that kids exhibit it the most stongly, but what I said applies to inexperienced adult computer users as well. A good number of home users didn't really get into computing until later on, view Windows and the computer as one, and make decisions accordingly. They aren't resistant to technology in the same way that I might be. I don't want to install Linux from scratch for the reasons you specified (lack of knowledge of how to do it). This newer cluster of computer users wouldn't want to install anything other than Windows because because they don't see Windows as a discrete component of their computing environment. It's not that they don't know how they would, it's that they don't know why they would.
  • Reply 16 of 35
    mynameheremynamehere Posts: 560member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mac The Fork

    I made the point that kids exhibit it the most stongly, but what I said applies to inexperienced adult computer users as well. A good number of home users didn't really get into computing until later on, view Windows and the computer as one, and make decisions accordingly. They aren't resistant to technology in the same way that I might be. I don't want to install Linux from scratch for the reasons you specified (lack of knowledge of how to do it). This newer cluster of computer users wouldn't want to install anything other than Windows because because they don't see Windows as a discrete component of their computing environment. It's not that they don't know how they would, it's that they don't know why they would.



    they might not install linux, but they might buy a mac....after all, OSX is integrated with apple hardware
  • Reply 17 of 35
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ipodandimac

    i'm glad MS is spending more time finding a name for the "new" OS rather than actually working on it. And who actually attended this press conference?



    As an IT pro in training, I would like to see MS just get it fucking right for once (2k was three steps in that direction, XP was 14 steps back), the fact is that 95%+ of the real world uses MS, they need to make something that just works, because like it or not, like lemmings, the companies will upgrade to the next version of windows, no matter how much it totaly sucks.



    The problem is not the IT guys, it is the managers that make decisions baced on a: what they already have

    and B: how pretty the flyers are...



    The other problem is the amount of apps that have been built MS-only for years, look at the custom apps from most any ASP* shop or in-house for the major corperations, they and to some extent the data they generate is windows reliant.



    The other big factor is that users are friggen stupid for the most part, look at the 2k->xp transition, people freak out because the start button iss green...admins have to hack it on the images so that it runs as "classic" so as not to generate a zillion phone calls to helpdesk (the pergatory of the IT world for geeks) If a transition is to be made, the employees must ben trained, whilst it is a worth wile investment in the long term, the bean counters dont like the short term costs.



    *app service provider - not the MS product
  • Reply 18 of 35
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mac The Fork

    Many people, especially younger kids, haven't grown up with the level of competition and interchangeability that we have in certain areas. These people tend not to think of Windows as a product separate from the computer. They started using computers when Microsoft had dominated the market. They started using the Internet after the web had matured and taken on the role of an e-mail client and numerous other services. They started using the web after Netscape was knocked out. They started using IM after MSN Messenger became prominent. Since they haven't experienced many different configurations in computing, very separate and interchangeable elements of computing appear as one. Since it Windows appears to comprise their entire computing experience, it's virtually one with the computer. I think it's possible that many people will continue to upgrade Windows as they would upgrade other critical components of their computer. Add some RAM, get a DVD burner, get a new Windows, get a new hard drive, etc.



    I think you have it backwards, kids are fearless, they love to tinker, take risks, buck the establishment. In this vein, we could see the beginning of the end of MS at a 90+% share because todays "kids" are tomorrows leaders/techies/inventors/programmers...
  • Reply 19 of 35
    bergzbergz Posts: 1,045member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by a_greer

    The problem is not the IT guys, it is the managers that make decisions baced on a: what they already have

    and B: how pretty the flyers are...




    Rehashed SJ interview from 2004(?):



    Quote:

    ...Some very good product people invent some very good products, and the company achieves a monopoly. But after that, the product people aren't the ones that drive the company forward anymore. It's the marketing guys or the ones who expand the business into Latin America or whatever.



    Because what's the point of focusing on making the product even better when the only company you can take business from is yourself?



    So a different group of people start to move up. And who usually ends up running the show? The sales guy....



    Q: Is this common in the industry?



    Look at Microsoft -- who's running Microsoft?



    Q: Steve Ballmer.



    A: Right, the sales guy. Case closed. And that's what happened at Apple, as well.



    --B
  • Reply 20 of 35
    Quote:

    I think you have it backwards, kids are fearless, they love to tinker, take risks, buck the establishment. In this vein, we could see the beginning of the end of MS at a 90+% share because todays "kids" are tomorrows leaders/techies/inventors/programmers...



    I've been trying to say that, whether it's kids or adults, it's not just fear or resistance, it's often ignorance. Kids I've dealt with have been adventurous within Windows, within Internet Explorer, etc. It's not that kids are at all reluctant to try something else; they just didn't know that something else existed. Up until very recently, I think this has been the case. The iPod has changed things for Apple. If it weren't for the iPod, though, I think we could have seen a generation of really entrenched Windows users.
Sign In or Register to comment.