The New Macintosh Naming Scheme?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
Since Apple now is leaving PowerPC processors and going Intel, what are they going to do with the names PowerMac and PowerBook?



The current names were launched with the shift from the motorola 68k CISC processors to PowerPC RISC processors.



With the new shift back to CISC, will Apple invent a new naming scheme?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 74
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by svin

    Since Apple now is leaving PowerPC processors and going Intel, what are they going to do with the names PowerMac and PowerBook?



    The current names were launched with the shift from the motorola 68k CISC processors to PowerPC RISC processors.



    With the new shift back to CISC, will Apple invent a new naming scheme?




    The answer is "probably." However, anyone who knows won't tell you and anyone who will tell you doesn't know.



    Word to the wise: Most questions about Apple's future plans have essentially the answer I gave to your question. Apple is an enormously secretive company with excellent security. Its security has only gotten better in recent years. IIRC, the last accurate leak of a new Apple computer box was the MDD G4. Everyone knew the G5 was coming, but the best sketch of it was totally wrong. Consider the Mighty Mouse. Despite the fact that a lot of people were screaming that Apple should sell a multibutton mouse, the existence of Mighty Mouse was not leaked. I dare say that no one would have guessed that Apple's multibutton mouse would look like the Mighty Mouse. And to your point, no one guessed or leaked that its name would be Mighty Mouse.
  • Reply 2 of 74
    jousterjouster Posts: 460member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by svin

    Since Apple now is leaving PowerPC processors and going Intel, what are they going to do with the names PowerMac and PowerBook?



    The current names were launched with the shift from the motorola 68k CISC processors to PowerPC RISC processors.



    With the new shift back to CISC, will Apple invent a new naming scheme?




    Those are very useful, well-entrenched trademarked names. They are worth a great deal of money to Apple in terms of brand recognition and therefore sales. Why would Apple change them just because the processor architecture is changing? The vast majority of users care little and know practically nothing about the change. The idea, seen here and on other boards, that the product name should somehow reflect the processor name just seems badly wrong, at least to me. I'll be astonished if they change the names.
  • Reply 3 of 74
    fahlmanfahlman Posts: 696member
    The PowerBook 100 had a Motorola MC68HC000 running at 16Mhz. The Power Macintosh 6100 had a PowerPC 601 running at 60MHz. So the Power name was was around, in portables, before the switch to the PowerPC processor. I assume it'll be around after the switch away from the PowerPC processor.
  • Reply 4 of 74
    svinsvin Posts: 30member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mr. Me

    The answer is "probably." However, anyone who knows won't tell you and anyone who will tell you doesn't know.



    Word to the wise: Most questions about Apple's future plans have essentially the answer I gave to your question. Apple is an enormously secretive company with excellent security. Its security has only gotten better in recent years. IIRC, the last accurate leak of a new Apple computer box was the MDD G4. Everyone knew the G5 was coming, but the best sketch of it was totally wrong. Consider the Mighty Mouse. Despite the fact that a lot of people were screaming that Apple should sell a multibutton mouse, the existence of Mighty Mouse was not leaked. I dare say that no one would have guessed that Apple's multibutton mouse would look like the Mighty Mouse. And to your point, no one guessed or leaked that its name would be Mighty Mouse.






    I didn't actually expect an answer from somebody who knows for sure whats going to happen. I was just thinking of all the "Intel powermac" or "Intel Powerbook" related discussions, and thought since the "power" stands for PowerPC Apple almost *needs* to invent a new name for the intel based products. But what could possibly be cooler sounding than PowerMac or PowerBook. Maybe they'll just keep the names because of the allready strong brand value...
  • Reply 5 of 74
    benroethigbenroethig Posts: 2,782member
    in the case of the Powerbook, it predates the PowerPC. The PowerMac replaced the Quadra as the pro series when the PowerPC was released. The "Power" portion has come to signify more the processional series than the PowerPC, so I think the name will stand.
  • Reply 6 of 74
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    I'd say it's almost certain the "Power" names will stay, but you can almost bet on the "G_" nomenclature leaving.
  • Reply 7 of 74
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    How about Powerbook PMS



    P= power

    M= merom

    S= Single core



    only gives you trouble at the end of the month!





  • Reply 8 of 74
    ajpriceajprice Posts: 320member
    G3, G4 and G5 represent the 3rd, 4th and 5th generations of PowerPC chip after the original 601 and then the 603/604 series of processors. So I can't see them carrying on with the G series naming. From what I understand of the Intel chips that are being used now and might be used in the Intel Macs, there are too many different chips to make a simple naming based on the processor type, ie, Yonah, Merom, Conroe, Pentium M, Xeon etc. Where do you start?



    Hey why don't they just call them iBook, iMac, Mac mini, Powerbook, Powermac and XServe??? \
  • Reply 9 of 74
    kreshkresh Posts: 379member
    Power Mac -> Power Mac Pro



    Power Book -> Power Book Pro



    Imac -> Power Mac



    iBook -> Power Book



    Mac Mini -> Power Mac Mini



    I think they will go for unified naming theme without any specific processor or model identifiers.
  • Reply 10 of 74
    kossikossi Posts: 5member
    Professional:



    PowerMac:

    Workstation tower, multi-core, multiprocessor, 2 Apple Drive Modules for hard drives.

    $2000-3000



    PowerBook:

    $1500-2500



    Mac Pro:

    Vertically-oriented small form-factor machine.

    $1000-2000



    Consumer:



    iBook

    $1000-1500



    iMac

    $1000-1500



    Mac Mini

    iMac minus the monitor

    $500-1000
  • Reply 11 of 74
    Well, on the issue of Apple's secrecy, I do remember seeing a 20GB iPod "photo" on Ebay, complete with a photo, about a week before the touted upgrade.



    The only other secretive company I can think of that's more secretive than Apple is Nintendo.
  • Reply 12 of 74
    icfireballicfireball Posts: 2,594member
    You have to relealize, with this archetecture change, Apple wants to slip it under the rug as much as possible. Don't expect anything radicly differnt than what is today.
  • Reply 13 of 74
    dhagan4755dhagan4755 Posts: 2,150member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by icfireball

    You have to relealize, with this archetecture change, Apple wants to slip it under the rug as much as possible.



    I agree.



    That's why I don't think that Apple will refrain from announcing newly redesigned products just because they're waiting for the Intel parts to put in them.
  • Reply 14 of 74
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by FireEmblemPride

    Well, on the issue of Apple's secrecy, I do remember seeing a 20GB iPod "photo" on Ebay, complete with a photo, about a week before the touted upgrade.



    Are you talking about the recent change to color screens or the original iPod photo? There was no 20GB "iPod photo"...ever.
  • Reply 15 of 74
    Quote:

    Originally posted by CosmoNut

    Are you talking about the recent change to color screens or the original iPod photo? There was no 20GB "iPod photo"...ever.



    Yes, hence the quotation marks around the word "photo."
  • Reply 16 of 74
    cubistcubist Posts: 954member
    The "PowerPC" name came from IBM to show that the processors were a derivative of the PowerRISC used in the RS6000 and similar machines. I think it's possibly an acronym. Apple probably has a license to use it from IBM in accord with their membership in the erstwhile AIM Group.



    Altho the notebooks were called PowerBooks before they had PowerPCs in them, the PowerPC conversion was in progress at the time, so the use of "Power" on such un-powerful units was an instance of what Gerald Weinberg calls "the Bolden Rule", an intentional altho deceptive use of the "halo effect". Much like one might call the Mac Mini the "iPod Mac" even though it is not an iPod.



    So inasmuch as the "Power" name does definitely indicate the processor architecture, for them to continue using it on new products would be bad in two ways: (1) deceptive to those who intended to purchase a PowerPC product, and (2) a "reverse halo effect" by associating the new machines with the old architecture. It would be similar to Apple calling a 7100, say, a "Quadra". They did not do so then, nor will they now, if they have any sense (or good legal advice).
  • Reply 17 of 74
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    Cubist, with all due respect, I can imagine the Apple engineers making the same arguments to Phil Schiller and Steve Jobs and getting a reply of, "Yeah, well who cares? It's a brand and we're going to keep it."



    We'll just have to see.
  • Reply 18 of 74
    hobbeshobbes Posts: 1,252member
    I seriously doubt it. "Powerbook" for example is very well branded. Doesn't much matter to consumers if there's a PPC or Intel chip inside -- they just want to get a decent sense of how fast the thing is.



    The question to my mind is how Apple will market generational stages.... no more G-, of course. This is an interestingly thorny marketing challenge that I think Apple could handle better than other PC manufacturers out there.
  • Reply 19 of 74
    svinsvin Posts: 30member
    What about:





    Powerbook Centrino

    Ibook Celeron

    PowerMac V (for Pentium V)

    Imac Celeron



    or just the Intel processor numbers:



    Powerbook 780

    Ibook 750

    Powermac 840

    Imac 350





    Or what about a Rebirth of the legendary powerful Quadra(dual, dual-core processors = 4 = quadra:



    Powermac = Apple Macintosh Quadra 840



    The Powerbook is more difficult because it has only been called Powerbook in it's entire life time.



  • Reply 20 of 74
    svinsvin Posts: 30member
    edit:



    double post
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