Saying goodbye to Apple's eMac

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Apple's eMac computer is soon to become nothing more than a collector's item.



Only three years after introducing the eMac for its education customers, sources are reporting that Apple is ready to permanently discontinue the Mac model.



Introduced on April 29th, 2002, the eMac all-in-one desktop was coined "the most affordable G4 system ever." It featured a 700 MHz PowerPC G4 processor and a built-in 17-inch flat CRT display.



In the three-plus years that would follow, the eMac saw only minimal updates, recently topping out at 1.42GHz -- a revision Apple introduced quietly in May of this year without notifying the press.



Although the eMac initially served its purpose in catering to educational institutions that required the "complete package" in a single enclosure at a low cost, its CRT-based design has since grown dated.



Today Apple is able to offer its educational customers a more fashionable all-in-one package with its new flat-panel iMac, and a low-cost solution with its sub-$500 Mac mini.



For Apple, the design of the eMac may have also become burden to produce and revise. According to industry source, the eMac's all-in-one enclosure was the most expensive part of the computer to manufacturer and was uneasily modified.



As of Tuesday afternoon, Apple had yet to issue an official end-of-life notice for existing eMacs, but sources familiar with the matter were told by the company not to expect new models.



Providing further evidence of the discontinuation is Apple's own website and online store, both of which appear to be phasing out references to the computer.



Apple is expected to continue to sell the eMac until existing inventory is exhausted.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 46
    goodbye
  • Reply 2 of 46
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,238member
    I don't know what the sales to ed. customers have been around the country, but they are still popular here in NYC.



    It is popular because it is an all in one, and sturdy as well. The price is also popular.



    I'm not sure the iMac is a suitable overall replacememt in K-12.
  • Reply 3 of 46
    the eMac is still available to schools through the Apple Store for Education. (it's no longer available to students or teachers to purchase for use at home, but it's still listed on the page for schools to buy equipment)



    Don't forget, this started out as an education-only model and it was not released to the general public for several months after it was announced. It has now returned to its original status.



    I think it will stick around for a few more months, but eventually I would expect Apple to tell its education customers to buy the Mac mini and get their CRTs elsewhere.
  • Reply 4 of 46
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Over at MR there's much silly debate over whether the eMac or Mac Mini is "better." Obviously they BOTH have their own advantages.



    eMac: faster (HD), speakers, mic, audio-in, all-in-one simplicity, more USB ports, and no hassle of finding your own peripherals. And CRTs are durable in schools. Mac Mini: flexible, small, light, and CHEAP! And not locked into one display. Great for switchers/adders.



    If demand for the eMac has dropped, then so be it. But I do wonder if something new might replace it...



    I hope Apple starts to sell a low-end LCD or CRT, because otherwise there is no more "one stop shop" for low-end Mac buyers.



    PS, I still like my eMac First-gen, 700 Mhz, still going strong.
  • Reply 5 of 46
    Good riddance. Ugly step-child. Poor CRT.



    It was dated.



    EOL.



    Lemon Bon Bon
  • Reply 6 of 46




    notice the gap in the image where the emac gif has been removed. Its a different color.
  • Reply 7 of 46
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,238member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Lemon Bon Bon

    Good riddance. Ugly step-child. Poor CRT.



    It was dated.



    EOL.



    Lemon Bon Bon




    Your not liking it doesn't mean that it is bad.



    In a K-12 context an LCD is much less durable than a crt.



    I've seen the Dell LCD's in PC labs destroyed from kids sticking pencil and pen points to the screen. The eMacs are almost indestructible.
  • Reply 8 of 46
    I'll second the request for a new lcd-based iMac (low cost, like the mini, not like the iMac)...and for a 17" lcd monitor...DELL actually does something similar...the monitor and computer are physically sperate but they're mounted on the same pedestal.
  • Reply 9 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally posted by melgross

    I've seen the Dell LCD's in PC labs destroyed from kids sticking pencil and pen points to the screen. The eMacs are almost indestructible.



    So they have taste...



    But yes, you're right...maybe Apple can come up with a solution...they are Apple after all...



    Incidentially, my school has the 100 or so of the Dell systems I described above and to my knowledge, vandalism hasn't really been a problem, but then I suppose it varies by school. Before that we had G3 iMacs and we had problems with people messing up the cd drives and the floppy drives on the IBM's that we had at the time. (the Dells don't have CD or floppy drives)
  • Reply 10 of 46
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,238member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mynamehere

    So they have taste...



    But yes, you're right...maybe Apple can come up with a solution...they are Apple after all...



    Incidentially, my school has the 100 or so of the Dell systems I described above and to my knowledge, vandalism hasn't really been a problem, but then I suppose it varies by school. Before that we had G3 iMacs and we had problems with people messing up the cd drives and the floppy drives on the IBM's that we had at the time. (the Dells don't have CD or floppy drives)




    I wasn't actually picking on Dell. Here in NYC Dell and Apple are the only approved vendors. In fact the Bd of Ed buys its Macs and service for them through - Dell!
  • Reply 11 of 46
    sjksjk Posts: 603member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by nagromme

    eMac: ..., more USB ports, ...



    And two FW ports.



    The eMac's fan is significantly noisier.



    Quote:

    PS, I still like my eMac First-gen, 700 Mhz, still going strong.



    1.25Ghz here, bought during the long wait between the iMac G4 -> G5 transition. My wife and EyeTV are happily sharing it.



    Personally, I think the eMac was a better value than the mini. And easily a better value than the last overpriced iMac G4, which I liked but couldn't justify buying when I suspected the end was near for that model.
  • Reply 12 of 46
    Well, I kept forgetting that the eMac existed, and I guess this is proof of that. I thought it was the ugliest desktop Apple offered, too. I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by going with the mini and their current computer monitors.
  • Reply 13 of 46
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,238member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by FireEmblemPride

    Well, I kept forgetting that the eMac existed, and I guess this is proof of that. I thought it was the ugliest desktop Apple offered, too. I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by going with the mini and their current computer monitors.



    Schools prefer simplicity. The less cables to have, to plug in, to unplug when moving machines around, to find the cables again, to plug it back together. No, they would rather an all-in-one. Apple has been selling all-in-one computers to schools for many years. The 5400 all-in-one's were very popular. Many are still in use after all these years.
  • Reply 14 of 46
    Cmon guys, its sad when a faitful computer is disontinued sob sob
  • Reply 15 of 46
    I always thought an eServer + low-cost thin clients would be good for education customers... Imagine a 17" iMac design with optional CD/DVD drive and flash memory instead of a hard drive.
  • Reply 16 of 46
    I like mine. good solid peice of kit. bought it when i couldn't afford an angel-poise iMac. Now though I'll be saving up to go top-end on the iMac though as it seems so good.



    agree with everyone that Apple should allow a one-stop-shop for cheaper customers as well. Maybe they could drop the price of their displays or bring out a cheap line.... maybe a bad idea... but they should do something.... not everyone needs an iBook.
  • Reply 17 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Lemon Bon Bon

    Good riddance. Ugly step-child. Poor CRT.



    It was dated.



    EOL.



    Lemon Bon Bon




    Have you actually used an eMac? The screens are amazing. Flat, crisp, bright. Top quality next to standard PC monitors (which I use daily).



    We all thought it was ugly, but it grew on us (I think I speak for most). Apple created it to meet a demand placed upon them by the educational market (after they announced the death of CRT). It served its purpose will, and for that, it was a notable product.



    Onwards and upwards, though.
  • Reply 18 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally posted by coolfactor

    Have you actually used an eMac? The screens are amazing. Flat, crisp, bright. Top quality next to standard PC monitors (which I use daily).



    We all thought it was ugly, but it grew on us (I think I speak for most). Apple created it to meet a demand placed upon them by the educational market (after they announced the death of CRT). It served its purpose will, and for that, it was a notable product.



    Onwards and upwards, though.




    Hear, hear!
  • Reply 19 of 46
    My school just got a classroom full of these suckers for photoshop.
  • Reply 20 of 46
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,238member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by alliancep.s.i

    My school just got a classroom full of these suckers for photoshop.



    That's what I'm saying. Not the most advanced, but simple, reliable, and powerful enough for that purpose. A slightly higher rez screen would help, but it's all down to cost.
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