Apple "Mac Pro" trademark filing surfaces

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
Sticking with its recently-uncovered practice of filing trademarks for unannounced product names through overseas trademark and intellectual property offices, Apple Computer late last year sought a trademark on the phrase "Mac Pro" from New Zealand's Intellectual Property Office.



Speculation based purely on the filing itself would suggest that Apple may be considering a re-branding of its Power Mac line of professional desktops later this year when it introduces the first models based on Intel processors. The company recently renamed its PowerBook line of professional laptops "MacBook Pro" in a effort to leverage and better distinguish its "Mac" trademark and brand in the personal computer market.



In the filing, dated November 18, 2005, Apple broadly describes "Mac Pro" as "computers; computer hardware; computer software; computer peripherals; notebook computers; laptop computers; tablet computers; computer servers; handheld computers; mobile computers; hard drives; audio speakers; speakers for computers; radios; cameras; video cameras; telephones; mobile telephones; personal digital assistants; electronic organizers; electronic notepads; magnetic data carriers; telephones; mobile phones; computer gaming machines; microprocessors; memories boards; monitors; displays; keyboards; computer input devices; computer cables; modems; printers; parts and accessories for all the aforesaid goods." The trademark request is still under examination.



Details pertaining to Apple's forthcoming updates to the Power Mac line have been far and few between. Perhaps the most interesting and reliable piece of information has come from sources who last year told AppleInsider that the Cupertino, Calif.-based company had tapped industry heavyweight Intel to help design the computer's logicboard inside Intel's Oregon division.



Earlier this month, AppleInsider was first to reveal that Apple had begun filing for trademarks on unannounced products through overseas offices. Two interesting trademark filings that surfaced in Hong Kong reference an 'iPod Boombox" and a device or service called "iPod Hi-Fi."



The trademark filing for "Mac Pro" was first noted in a report on TheStreet.com, which takes a closer look at Apple's practice of filing for vital trademarks overseas before it does so in the United States.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 57
    I wonder if their servers will now be called BigMac Pro.
  • Reply 2 of 57
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    That laundry list of things "Mac Pro" covers is, um, extensive.



    Perhaps someone familiar with patent strategies would know if this kind of thing is done just to cover the bases, or possibly to throw off obsessive compulsive Apple watchers by burying some actual planned products in a haystack; or if the patent actually implies that Apple has plans to make every consumer electronic device known to man.
  • Reply 3 of 57
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    In time for Mac World Paris Apple should register Le Royale as well!!



  • Reply 4 of 57
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by TednDi

    in the for Mac World Paris Apple should register Le Royale as well!!







    Or would it be Le Royale Pro?
  • Reply 5 of 57
    Maybe there will be 3 Macs in the future: Mac mini, Mac and Mac Pro. Personally I prefer PowerMac, but a headless mid-range would be interesting.
  • Reply 6 of 57
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    They might change the PowerMac name, but they don't have to: it already has "Mac" in it, it has brand recognition, and the "power" (formerly PPC) part can have a generic meaning the way PowerBooks used to (they came before PPC).



    This filing tell us nothing about the names of future pro towers.



    * If they were going to name them Mac Pro, then they would file for this trademark.



    * If they were NOT going to name them Mac Pro, then they would STILL file for this trademark. To prevent other companies from using the name, a method Apple has used many times.



    So either way, they'd still trademark it. We can't tell anything from that.
  • Reply 7 of 57
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by CosmoNut

    Or would it be Le Royale Pro?



    with a side of shuffle?



  • Reply 8 of 57
    cosmonutcosmonut Posts: 4,872member
    I really can't see any Apple computer having the official name of "Mac." The platform itself is the Mac platform, and having a unit with that name would cause all sorts of confusion: "Are you talking about *A* Mac or *THE* Mac?"



    I just had a thought: Might we see a special edition 10th Anniversary iMac in 2008? I suppose it depends on if we see a 30th Anniversary Mac this year.



    \
  • Reply 9 of 57
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,947member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by addabox

    That laundry list of things "Mac Pro" covers is, um, extensive.



    Perhaps someone familiar with patent strategies would know if this kind of thing is done just to cover the bases, or possibly to throw off obsessive compulsive Apple watchers by burying some actual planned products in a haystack; or if the patent actually implies that Apple has plans to make every consumer electronic device known to man.




    Maybe. I think it could simply mean that they are trying to prevent companies from releasing an electronic product named "Mac Pro".
  • Reply 10 of 57
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,797member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Danosaur

    I wonder if their servers will now be called BigMac Pro.



    That IS a good one!
  • Reply 11 of 57
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,797member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by nagromme

    They might change the PowerMac name, but they don't have to: it already has "Mac" in it, it has brand recognition, and the "power" (formerly PPC) part can have a generic meaning the way PowerBooks used to (they came before PPC).



    This filing tell us nothing about the names of future pro towers.



    * If they were going to name them Mac Pro, then they would file for this trademark.



    * If they were NOT going to name them Mac Pro, then they would STILL file for this trademark. To prevent other companies from using the name, a method Apple has used many times.



    So either way, they'd still trademark it. We can't tell anything from that.




    All that can be said here is that Jobs specifically said that Apple was through with anything Power, and that they were going to use the name Mac for all of their computers.
  • Reply 12 of 57
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,797member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    Maybe. I think it could simply mean that they are trying to prevent companies from releasing an electronic product named "Mac Pro".



    They might also name other devices with that as PART of the name. Maybe the Mac Pro Mouse The Mac Pro Keyboard, etc.
  • Reply 13 of 57
    Quote:

    Originally posted by TednDi

    In time for Mac World Paris Apple should register Le Royale as well!!







    Le Royal w/ cheese?
  • Reply 14 of 57
    gene cleangene clean Posts: 3,481member
    So the saga of lame names continues. Mac Pro... um, o...kaaaaay.
  • Reply 15 of 57
    Quote:

    Originally posted by zpapasmurf

    Le Royal w/ cheese?



    Le Royal w/ Firewire 800
  • Reply 16 of 57
    josa92josa92 Posts: 193member
    why such a broad range opf devices?

    and they named telephones twice.
  • Reply 17 of 57
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by melgross

    All that can be said here is that Jobs specifically said that Apple was through with anything Power, and that they were going to use the name Mac for all of their computers.



    True, but I think it was an off-the-cuff explanation not to be taken too seriously: he also said the "Power" in PowerBook stood for PowerPC, which isn't true. What he said about needing to ADD "Mac" to the name makes more sense to me.



    A whole new naming scheme is possible, it wouldn't surprise me at this point, but the trademark doesn't mean much either way.
  • Reply 18 of 57
    eckingecking Posts: 1,588member
    I knew it! I as soon as I heard MacBook Pro, Mac Pro was the logical next step.

    Expect iMacBook instead of ibook. Search the forums you'll all see I called it.
  • Reply 19 of 57
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by addabox

    That laundry list of things "Mac Pro" covers is, um, extensive.



    Perhaps someone familiar with patent strategies would know if this kind of thing is done just to cover the bases, or possibly to throw off obsessive compulsive Apple watchers by burying some actual planned products in a haystack; or if the patent actually implies that Apple has plans to make every consumer electronic device known to man.




    Yeah, here's the patent application for Apple's Mobile Me. I mean, what doesn't this thing do?

    Quote:

    S/N: 78785959

    IC 042. US 100 101. G & S: Computer services; computer data recovery; data analysis being computer services; computer programming; updating of computer software; maintenance of computer software, computer and communications networks, and computer systems; research and development of computer hardware and software; website design, creation, hosting services; customized imprinting and design of messages, correspondence and other written communication which are delivered by electronic transmission; computer on-line services for the search, retrieval, indexing and organization of data on computer and communication networks; providing use of on-line, non-downloadable software; providing use of on-line, non-downloadable software for communications via local or global communications networks, including the Internet, Intranets, Extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular, and satellite networks; analyzing data to detect, eradicate and prevent the occurrence of computer viruses; computer services relating to the protection of computer hardware, computer software, computer networks and computer systems against computer viruses, attacks, or failures; computer services for enhancing the performance, security and functionality of computer and communications networks; computer help-line services; technical support services relating to computers, computer software, telecommunications, and the Internet; consultancy and provision of information and advice relating to the aforesaid; all provided on-line from a computer database or provided from facilities on local or global communications networks, including the Internet, Intranets, Extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular, and satellite networks



    S/N: 78785959

    IC 041. US 100 101 107. G & S: providing digital music from local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular and satellite networks; operating chat rooms; publication of electronic books and journals from local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular and satellite networks; providing on-line electronic publications; electronic games services provided from local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular and satellite networks; information relating to music entertainment, education, interactive entertainment and education, provided on-line from local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular and satellite networks; music library services; organizing and conducting seminars and training courses relating to science, engineering, computer systems and business; education services relating to planning, production and distribution of live or recorded audio, visual or audio visual material; education and entertainment information services; providing online databases and directories in the field of music, concerts, videos, radio television, news, sports, games, cultural events and entertainment; providing online magazines, newsletters and books in the field of music, concerts, videos, radio, television news, sports, games, cultural events, and entertainment; organizing exhibitions for entertainment, educational and cultural purposes, music, concerts, film and motion picture events, audio and video events; publishing of text and graphics from local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular and satellite networks;



    S/N: 78785943

    IC 038. US 100 101 104. G & S: Telecommunication services; electronic transmission and retrieval of data, images, audio, video and documents, including text, cards, letters, messages, mail, animations, and electronic mail, over local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular and satellite networks; electronic transmission of computer software over local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular, and satellite networks; electronic mail services; facsimile transmission; web site portal services; providing access to databases and local or global communications networks, including the internet, intranets, extranets, television, mobile communication, cellular, and satellite networks; internet service provider services; message transmission services, namely, electronic transmission of messages; telecommunication services for the dissemination of information by mobile telephone, namely the transmission of data to mobile telephones; mobile telephone communication services



    S/N: 78785931

    IC 009. US 021 023 026 036 038. G & S: Portable digital electronic devices and software related thereto; handheld digital electronic devices and software related thereto; digital audio players, including digital music players, and software related thereto; digital video players and software related thereto; MP3 players and software related thereto; handheld computers, personal digital assistants, pagers, electronic organizers, electronic notepads; telephones, mobile phones, videophones; computer gaming machines; microprocessors, memory boards; monitors, displays, keyboards, cables, modems, printers, disk drives; cameras, digital cameras; prerecorded computer programs for personal information management; database management software; character recognition software; telephony management software; electronic mail and messaging software, paging software; database synchronization software; computer programs for accessing, browsing and searching online databases; computer operating system software; application development tool programs for personal and handheld computers; handheld electronic devices for the wireless receipt and/or transmission of data; handheld electronic devices with video, phone, messaging, photo capturing and audio transmission functionality; software for the redirection of messages, e-mail, and/or other data to one or more handheld electronic devices;




  • Reply 20 of 57
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,797member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by nagromme

    True, but I think it was an off-the-cuff explanation not to be taken too seriously: he also said the "Power" in PowerBook stood for PowerPC, which isn't true. What he said about needing to ADD "Mac" to the name makes more sense to me.



    A whole new naming scheme is possible, it wouldn't surprise me at this point, but the trademark doesn't mean much either way.




    That's always possible, but it sounded as though it was something that he planned to say. If you watched the way he said it, and waved his arm in a dismissive way, it seemed final.



    The fact that those of us like you and I have to explain to people that "Power" came before the PPC shows that most people don't know much from that far back. The name has become associated with the chip.



    It's too bad, really, it was a good name. It sounded professional.
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