Conroe/Merom = Core Duo 2?

thttht
Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
The branding mania continues. From Computer Reseller News:



Intel Brands Next-Gen Client Processors, Cuts Prices On Existing Parts



... The Conroe desktop processors, scheduled to ship in June, and Merom, Intel's next batch of mobile processors planned for an August release, will both be branded Core Duo 2. Intel will also call its highest end desktop processors Intel Core 2 Extreme.




Still don't think Conroe is shipping in June. July maybe. Anyways, got a kick out of Core 2 Extreme for the Conroe "Extreme Edition". It's like they got advice from the Apple branding department!
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by THT



    Still don't think Conroe is shipping in June. July maybe. Anyways, got a kick out of Core 2 Extreme for the Conroe "Extreme Edition". It's like they got advice from the Apple branding department!




    Or from themselves, whichever.
  • Reply 2 of 25
    fran441fran441 Posts: 3,715member
    Wow, there are going to be some headaches over this one, I'm sure. Everyone who bought a Core Solo or Core Duo Mac are going to be confused when Apple will probably put Core Duo 2s (Meroms) in their next revisions of the MacBook Pro, iMac, and possibly the Mac Mini.



    Then you also have the fact that the upcoming MacBooks are still going to be running on Core Duos (and maybe Solos). If I was in the market for a new iBook/MacBook, I wouldn't exactly be thrilled that the Core Duo 2 was right around the corner and that if I wanted to see it in a MacBook, I'd have to wait for the *next* revision.



    If Apple is going to continue to use Yonahs and put Meroms, Conroes, and Woodcrests into future Macs, it's just going to get worse for Apple Marketing.
  • Reply 3 of 25
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Fran441

    Wow, there are going to be some headaches over this one, I'm sure. Everyone who bought a Core Solo or Core Duo Mac are going to be confused when Apple will probably put Core Duo 2s (Meroms) in their next revisions of the MacBook Pro, iMac, and possibly the Mac Mini.



    Then you also have the fact that the upcoming MacBooks are still going to be running on Core Duos (and maybe Solos). If I was in the market for a new iBook/MacBook, I wouldn't exactly be thrilled that the Core Duo 2 was right around the corner and that if I wanted to see it in a MacBook, I'd have to wait for the *next* revision.



    If Apple is going to continue to use Yonahs and put Meroms, Conroes, and Woodcrests into future Macs, it's just going to get worse for Apple Marketing.




    Oh come on now. You're acting like a spoiled child. Core Duos not fast enough for you or something? The current Core Duos are very decent chips...especially in a MacBook where performance isn't a priority.
  • Reply 4 of 25
    thttht Posts: 4,497member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Fran441

    If Apple is going to continue to use Yonahs and put Meroms, Conroes, and Woodcrests into future Macs, it's just going to get worse for Apple Marketing.



    Why? The situation is no different from G3, G4, and G5. Apple may have to come up with cool Apple Core 1 and Core 2 monikers to brand their machines, but Apple has spanned multiple processor generations among its machines before.
  • Reply 5 of 25
    mr. dirkmr. dirk Posts: 187member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Fran441

    Wow, there are going to be some headaches over this one, I'm sure. Everyone who bought a Core Solo or Core Duo Mac are going to be confused when Apple will probably put Core Duo 2s (Meroms) in their next revisions of the MacBook Pro, iMac, and possibly the Mac Mini.



    Then you also have the fact that the upcoming MacBooks are still going to be running on Core Duos (and maybe Solos). If I was in the market for a new iBook/MacBook, I wouldn't exactly be thrilled that the Core Duo 2 was right around the corner and that if I wanted to see it in a MacBook, I'd have to wait for the *next* revision.



    If Apple is going to continue to use Yonahs and put Meroms, Conroes, and Woodcrests into future Macs, it's just going to get worse for Apple Marketing.




    The minimum processor requirements for Apple's universal software now includes "Intel Core" processor... I imagine that that won't change for a while, until software comes out that requires a "Intel Core 2" series processor (which presumably would be much later). In terms of marketing, I expect that after Apple stops hyping the "switch to Intel" thing, they'll remove focus from the specific processor, and instead focus on who the product is directed at. Sort of like they've done with PowerBooks and iBooks--both used G4s not that far apart in terms of speed, and yet Apple differentiated them quite nicely. It'll be even better with Intel, because something like Merom will go into MBPs, while MBs will still have Yonah, or a lower-power chip that better suits the target market. The idea being, of course, that if you need Merom power, you would buy a pro notebook.
  • Reply 6 of 25
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Fran441

    Wow, there are going to be some headaches over this one, I'm sure. Everyone who bought a Core Solo or Core Duo Mac are going to be confused when Apple will probably put Core Duo 2s (Meroms) in their next revisions of the MacBook Pro, iMac, and possibly the Mac Mini.



    Then you also have the fact that the upcoming MacBooks are still going to be running on Core Duos (and maybe Solos). If I was in the market for a new iBook/MacBook, I wouldn't exactly be thrilled that the Core Duo 2 was right around the corner and that if I wanted to see it in a MacBook, I'd have to wait for the *next* revision.



    If Apple is going to continue to use Yonahs and put Meroms, Conroes, and Woodcrests into future Macs, it's just going to get worse for Apple Marketing.




    My guess is that the era of Apple naming their machines around chips (e.g., PowerBook G4, PowerMac G5) are over. MacBook Pro will be MacBook Pro whether there's a core duo 1 or core duo 2 inside. They simply won't bring it up except in the fine print, ergo, no headaches.
  • Reply 7 of 25
    sybariticsybaritic Posts: 340member
    Quote:

    originally posted by BRussell

    My guess is that the era of Apple naming their machines around chips (e.g., PowerBook G4, PowerMac G5) are over. MacBook Pro will be MacBook Pro whether there's a core duo 1 or core duo 2 inside. They simply won't bring it up except in the fine print, ergo, no headaches.



    Right on.
  • Reply 8 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Fran441

    Wow, there are going to be some headaches over this one, I'm sure. Everyone who bought a Core Solo or Core Duo Mac are going to be confused when Apple will probably put Core Duo 2s (Meroms) in their next revisions of the MacBook Pro, iMac, and possibly the Mac Mini.



    Then you also have the fact that the upcoming MacBooks are still going to be running on Core Duos (and maybe Solos). If I was in the market for a new iBook/MacBook, I wouldn't exactly be thrilled that the Core Duo 2 was right around the corner and that if I wanted to see it in a MacBook, I'd have to wait for the *next* revision.



    If Apple is going to continue to use Yonahs and put Meroms, Conroes, and Woodcrests into future Macs, it's just going to get worse for Apple Marketing.




    ICD 2 ain't going in the macbooks anytime soon. They will be put in the next rev of the MBP's. Macbooks will stay with the core duos for a while. You should say that people in the market to buy a MBP anytime soon wont be thrilled.
  • Reply 9 of 25
    kcmackcmac Posts: 1,051member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BRussell

    My guess is that the era of Apple naming their machines around chips (e.g., PowerBook G4, PowerMac G5) are over. MacBook Pro will be MacBook Pro whether there's a core duo 1 or core duo 2 inside. They simply won't bring it up except in the fine print, ergo, no headaches.



    You're right but that won't stop us from doing it....
  • Reply 10 of 25
    I'm suprised that the "Core 2 Extreme" is being released first. I could swear I heard that wasn't coming out 'till 2007.
  • Reply 11 of 25
    thttht Posts: 4,497member
    CNet adds to the confusion:



    The second coming of Intel's Core Duo



    Intel has decided to borrow the sequential naming scheme it used for its famous Pentium brand and apply it to the new Core line of chips, the company is expected to announce Sunday. Earlier this year, Intel released the Core Duo processor, and in a few months it will unveil Core 2 Duo processors. The Core 2 Duo name will be used for desktop chips based on the Conroe chip, as well as for notebook chips based on the Merom chip. Merom processors consume less power than Conroe chips, but they're otherwise very similar.




    Is it Core 2 Duo or Core Duo 2? Who knows. If you read the whole article, you'll also be exposed to the laughably stupid power consumption integrated in the model number nonsense.
  • Reply 12 of 25
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    It's really an insignificant gripe, but am I the only one confused by their new naming system? The Merom chip is different from Yonah, shouldn't have a name that signifies this?
  • Reply 13 of 25
    Do you mean conroe and merom are different?
  • Reply 14 of 25
    jackbauerjackbauer Posts: 43member
    That's why they are calling it Core 2.
  • Reply 15 of 25
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by MacSuperiority

    Do you mean conroe and merom are different?



    No Yonah (Intel Core Duo) and Merom( Intel Core 2 Duo?). Seems to me their names should be different to greater signify that these are different chips. I'm trying not to get to hung up on names but I can see buyers (of pcs) thinking they were getting Merom when they actually got Yonah. When you look at Dell adds you'll see what I mean. They put the processor info in a small space on the specs and list it as T2300 ect. You really don't even know what the processor speed is many times unless you're familiar with Intel's nomenclature. Probably will be less of a problem for Apple as they can keep Merom for MBP and Yonah for MB. Actually I like Intel's developement names better than their market names, but thats just me I guess.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    shanmugamshanmugam Posts: 1,200member
    Core 1 - Current Architecture - Yonah (M)

    Core 2 - Next Gen Architecture - Merom (M),Conore (D) ,Woodcrest (S)

    Core 3 - Next Gen Architecture - ...



    Duo - 2 Cores

    Quad - 4 Cores

    Oct - 8 Cores



    M - Mobile

    D - Desktop

    S - Server



    i guess these CPU difference we will know from CPU numbers like 6000, 5000 & 4000 series ...



    When Core 2 Quad Will be available?

    that will be awesome for Mac Pro.
  • Reply 17 of 25
    mugwumpmugwump Posts: 233member
    So let's see here, I would like to see a ProMac Core 2 Duo Dual (4 cores) machine with a Woodcrest processor as the low / middle / high end offerings.



    I'm confused!



    OT: I would like to state for the record that the user "jackbauer" at this moment has "24" posts.
  • Reply 18 of 25
    programmerprogrammer Posts: 3,421member
    Core -> Core 2 is rather like G3 -> G4 -> G5, no? And architecturally it is more likely G3->G4 because the changes are relatively minor. It is essentially the same microarchitecture with a few refinements and enabled features.
  • Reply 19 of 25
    thttht Posts: 4,497member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by backtomac

    No Yonah (Intel Core Duo) and Merom( Intel Core 2 Duo?). Seems to me their names should be different to greater signify that these are different chips.



    Marketing has nothing to do with Engineering.



    "Core" is the new brand name of Intel's CPUs for personal computers. If they are successful with the branding, you'll have the pleasure of seeing Core 3, 4, and maybe 5 in the next 6 years regardless of the underlying technical differences between them.



    This is true of the "Pentium" brand. The original Pentium was a mere superscaler, 5-stage pipelined CPU. The next chip that came after that had 2 more execution units, wider issue width, more than doubled the pipeline stages to 12+, had a 256 KB off-die SRAM cache in its packaging, and did this crazy thing with the x86 instructions, decoding them into smaller micro-ops with OOOE for execution. What did Intel brand it? Pentium Pro. Then in the succeeding years, called it Pentium 2, Pentium 3, and if you stretch, Pentium M, and now Core 1 Duo/Solo.



    Not only that, a brand spanking new architecture unrelated in almost its entirety with an even longer pipeline, and DDR ALUs, and other stuff was called Pentium 4!



    I guess Sexium, Hexium, Septium, or whatever other latin number prefixes didn't make appealing sounding names.



    Quote:

    I'm trying not to get to hung up on names but I can see buyers (of pcs) thinking they were getting Merom when they actually got Yonah.



    Marketing isn't meant to clarify features to the buyers, but to get people to buy products. Obvious I know.
  • Reply 20 of 25
    akacakac Posts: 512member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Programmer

    Core -> Core 2 is rather like G3 -> G4 -> G5, no? And architecturally it is more likely G3->G4 because the changes are relatively minor. It is essentially the same microarchitecture with a few refinements and enabled features.



    Actually Core is based off Pentium M and is just a refinement of PM. Core 2 is a completely new designed that borrows from the Pentium M. So Core 2 is actually more like G4->G5.
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