iPhone plus dot Mac equals Halo 2

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
iPod has increased Mac sales by the so called "Halo effect". Customers impressed with the slick interface and integration of iTunes and iPod have bought Macs to get more of the same.



So perhaps Apple wants more of that halo effect action. If it was cool enough, iPhone could do the same thing for business types as the iPod did for music lovers.



Dot mac is seen as a pretty lacklustre set of online tools. But imagine dot mac integration in a cellphone handset. The server runs all the code and presents a web-like interface to a data set synced with your desktop PC. Sounds boring doesn't it - but in a mobile-phone handset you suddenly get something that blows other cellphones out of the water.



The cellphone could communicate with the server through the always-on GPRS data service. Dot mac itself could mirror the phone's state and that means Dot mac knows if anything has changed and whether the phone needs updating. And that means that with a single packet, the phone could be told that there is something new. A new email to be read, a new contact, a new appointment or even a new file.



If you want to preview or read the item on the phone, that single data can be sent via GPRS efficiently and cheaply.



The software on the phone could be quite dumb. It just needs a simple UI. But suddently you get a phone with some extra-ordinary abilities.



1) A Blackberry-beating email system. The phone has access to the same email account as your desktop PC and is in perfect synchronisation with it. The phone could read emails with large binary attachments. Read status would be synced with your desktop emails.



2) Contacts and calendars would be synced the same way. Not via Bluetooth once a week but immediately - always-on live data syncing over GPRS..... If your secretary books a meeting. It's there instantly on the phone. If a contact gives you his details on your phone, it appears in address book instantly.



3) You could use the same system to sync in the other direction. A full list of calls times and dates could be sent back into iCal. Back on your desktop machine you have a precise record when you last called Dave in purchasing.



4) In theory, you could even use your phone to open a spreadsheet that resides on your Mac desktop.



5) What is more, new features and functions can be rolled out by updating the dot mac phone server. So without changing the phone's firmware, new featues could be rolled out. For instance the phone's web browser could start sharing the bookmarks from your desktop's Safari.



If this is done well. And I mean really well, the cellphone suddenly becomes a lot, lot smarter, even though the majority of the smarts reside in an Apple dot mac phone server and not in the phone itself. The phone becomes a semi-smart satellite to all your data and communication.



Of course it could even work on a PC. But it would not work quite as well would it?



Now imagine the halo effect all over again. But instead of Coldplay and Tom Jones fans, it brings in the Blackberry set.



It's a thought.



C.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    This is a pretty interesting idea, and it actually makes sense in more way then one. The only thing that would make it make more sense is if the .Mac service was included with a phone purchase/monthly plan (it would almost have to be an Apple run cell plan rather then through a carrier). We'll see what happens.
  • Reply 2 of 28
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,081member
    Null.
  • Reply 3 of 28
    C... Even though your idea seems interesting, this is already possible.



    1) Gmail and Gmail for mobile is a very very good, useful email app. It's a JAVA app on your phone and the UI is simply amazing.

    When Yahoo comes out with their revised version of Yahoo Mail for Mobile, it will be on the same level. Their Yahoo Mail Beta - the web 2.0 version - has already made me use it as my #1 email app - all though a browser (drag and drop and other desktop-app-like features make it just as good as mail app for OS X).



    2) As for contacts/calendars as well as email:

    -With a full browser on my mobile, I can visit either Google/Yahoo (their real sites, not mobile) and log in to access my bookmarks, email, and contacts. Yes, this interface is "workable" at best, but it's being worked on very very rapidly by both aforementioned companies. As for calendars, Yahoo mobile provides an intuitive mobile version of their calendar, even though their web-cal on the desktop side is still very web 1.0... With Yahoo Bookmarks, I can access all of my stored Yahoo bookmarks right there.

    -My main compaint with .Mac right now is that it provides absolutely no way for me to access my AddressBook/contacts, calendar, and bookmarks online - say I'm at a WIndows PC - not a Mac and don't have my MacBook but don't want to take out my cell or want full-screen access. Both Yahoo and Google allow me to do this.

    -Gmail mobile gives me access to my contacts when I'm composing an email.



    3) Great idea - something I've been waiting for as well from either Yahoo/Google mobile apps. I'm sure it will come.



    4) If your phone has a "full" HTML browser, you can just go to Writely/Google Documents and open it up yourself right there. (considering, ofcourse, that it will be on there)



    5) Google and Yahoo can release new features on their mobile version sites without having me update my phone's software.



    Basically, 85% of this can be done already. Sure, Apple can provide what they do best - a very easy solution to all of this - but I see these areas being dominated by Google/Yahoo/maybe Microsoft within the next 2-3 years. And if one looks at what Yahoo is doing with Yahoo Go! for mobile, it's a good sign of things to come, and more.
  • Reply 4 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alexluft


    -My main compaint with .Mac right now is that it provides absolutely no way for me to access my AddressBook/contacts, calendar, and bookmarks online - say I'm at a WIndows PC - not a Mac and don't have my MacBook but don't want to take out my cell or want full-screen access. Both Yahoo and Google allow me to do this.



    I have no problems accessing my Mail/Contacts/Bookmarks/etc... through .Mac on my Windows box at work. I think that what C was going for was that most of the phone's "software" would really be served to the phone via .Mac, like your javascript apps from GMail. The up side to this is that your data can be synced to .Mac instantly, the software "on your phone" can be updated without updating your firmware since the software runs on the .mac servers.



    All in all a great idea, I'd love to see it done!
  • Reply 5 of 28
    Yes - precisely.



    And with the right client software on the phone running *all the time* - you wouldn't have to launch the phone's web-browser to check email - or look in the calendar to see your schedule. This stuff would just be there.



    New emails would just appear in the inbox. New appointments.. RSS feeds scroll across the screen... whatever.



    The thing is, this approach could easily accomodate all sorts of shared information that needs to be accessed via the phone. Toss 4 or 8 gigs of storage into the handset and you would have a device which could win people over from both Blackberry and from some PDA applications.



    like I say - just a thought.



    C.
  • Reply 6 of 28
    Just to add into this, the UK network 3 has recently announced that it's expanding its 3G services by offering the first-of-its-kind fixed price "broadband" (ISDN speed) mobile data plan, albeit with 'fair use' restrictions, but since phones don't have giant amounts this shouldn't ever really come into play. Some are rumouring the cost to be about £10/month on top of a standard contract for 'all you can eat' net access. It seems likely that other UK mobile networks will eventually [have to] follow their lead. This could be a significant step in blowing the market wide open for someone to come in at the same price and make a really good go of it, with a slick UI and full integration. Apple are well placed to do that, although I'm not sure how 3 are planning on paying for the network usage. Likely Apple could recoup some of the cost of the network charges in the price of the device itself, especially considering many people won't use these features to the maximum (how often do you use your mobile phone's other features?), except for say some business types and geeks.
  • Reply 7 of 28
    Least Ye not Forget....Apple aquired a brand spanking new MCI Data Center a while back...perfect perhaps for oh managing a Mobile Network!? I think with Apple controlling the Design, Hardware and Software as is there custom an iPhone would be a thing to behold, and the complete opposite of dumbed down service Carrier Only provided handsets. Full Bluetooth intergration with iCal, Address Book, Mail(?) etc perhaps a mobile vs of Safari...?

    I would happily pay a premium for an Apple iPhone as you just know that if the thing ever gets out the door it will blow everyone else out of the water.
  • Reply 8 of 28
    nijiniji Posts: 288member
    did apple actually go through with the purchase of that huge "data center" as you call it?

    i thought they abandoned it.
  • Reply 9 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by niji


    did apple actually go through with the purchase of that huge "data center" as you call it?

    i thought they abandoned it.



    All systems go:



    http://sanjose.bizjournals.com/sanjo...27/story5.html



    http://arstechnica.com/journals/appl...2006/2/28/3008
  • Reply 10 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bladerunner


    Least Ye not Forget....Apple aquired a brand spanking new MCI Data Center a while back...perfect perhaps for oh managing a Mobile Network!? I think with Apple controlling the Design, Hardware and Software as is there custom an iPhone would be a thing to behold, and the complete opposite of dumbed down service Carrier Only provided handsets. Full Bluetooth intergration with iCal, Address Book, Mail(?) etc perhaps a mobile vs of Safari...?

    I would happily pay a premium for an Apple iPhone as you just know that if the thing ever gets out the door it will blow everyone else out of the water.



    Yes but you can get to far by haveing your own network also many people with cell phones are locked into there Carrier and can't drop it.
  • Reply 11 of 28






    Yup, and considering that Steve announced to the Cupertino City Council at the purschase of the new acreage for the 2nd campus that they expect Apple to grow much bigger, I'd say some major stuff is being planned.



    That data center is central to something. Maybe it's just high def movies, but I have a feeling it's much more.
  • Reply 12 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe_the_dragon


    Yes but you can get to far by haveing your own network also many people with cell phones are locked into there Carrier and can't drop it.



    But I think therin lies the beauty of a combined Apple Network and Handset is that it would be feature rich and just work! I remember the first TV Ads for the Titanium Powerbook had Jeff Goldblum doing a voice over about all the specs and at the end he says "And Jeez Your Just So Gonna Want One!"



    I think the same would apply to an iPhone, and garner a big Halo Effect, as the feature set becomes known helped along of course by the Tv Ads and people thinking why cant my phone do that!?
  • Reply 13 of 28
    Steve also said years ago, not long after his return, that Apple would be one of the ten biggest internet companies within ten years. Internet=service. An iPhone will evolve into a multi-use device, even if the first iteration comes as an iPod+. Apple coaxes useers into new things by methodically moving things forward. The iPhone or whetevr it is, won't do everything immediately, but whatever it does, it will do well. Then, the next iteration will do more.



    Soon, Apple will control the weather.
  • Reply 14 of 28
    I was expecting them to control the speed and tilt of the earth by now. Come on apple hurry up!
  • Reply 15 of 28
    irelandireland Posts: 17,759member
    Title is confusing, Halo is a game.
  • Reply 16 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland


    Title is confusing, Halo is a game.



    Ireland,



    Indeed valid point! Have never quite forgiven Bungie for moving to the Dark Side. And highly unlikley we will ever get to see Halo 2 or 3 converted to the Mac platform.



    But....if there is even the slightest ray of hope out there, please do tell...



    @#$%^&*%#!!
  • Reply 17 of 28
    Meh, World of Warcraft is WAY more fun than HALO. Hands down.
  • Reply 18 of 28
    irelandireland Posts: 17,759member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bladerunner


    Ireland,



    Indeed valid point! Have never quite forgiven Bungie for moving to the Dark Side. And highly unlikley we will ever get to see Halo 2 or 3 converted to the Mac platform.



    But....if there is even the slightest ray of hope out there, please do tell...



    @#$%^&*%#!!



    I don't play computer games, although I may get a Wii in 2007, can't afford a PS3.
  • Reply 19 of 28
    Think if the information in your computer at home or at work also is available in your pocket. And you would not need to think about how to do to retrieve the information or share it with someone else. It would be as simple as making a call.



    What would happen if Apple enters the mobile market to compete head to head with Nokia, SonyEricsson, Motorola, Samsung and others? They have the preconditions to offer userfriendly services and acquire large groups of consumers, using more services than calls and SMS.



    Why should I buy a new mobile? To play music is my answer. I can do it with my iPod or

    SonyWalkman is your reply. You are right. It takes more to have a consumer to buy a new

    mobile phone.



    How about a mobile with a delicious design and an integrated camera? A camera with a

    simple interface that makes it easy for you to write your blogg and publish new pictures or

    videos wherever you are.



    The new version of Apples e-mail service .mac will make it even easier to have e-mail,

    calendar, address, document storage and backup available everywhere. You can have your

    own calendar and addresses in your phone as in your computer at home and on the Internet.



    When someone books a meeting, you will directly see it in on your mobile phone.



    The complete article can be read at www.artmann.se
  • Reply 20 of 28
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,081member
    Null.
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