Movie studios want new "anti-piracy" model from Apple

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sunilraman


    I want hardware.H264 encoding! Is it in any of those ATI X1900000000 and nVidia 7950GTXXXSTXXXX cards?



    Hardware encoding is pretty much impossible. It's not parallelizable.
  • Reply 62 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core


    I was answering you. Your statement is wrong.



    You're still not getting it, are you?



    Says a lot about your personality...
  • Reply 63 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gregmightdothat


    Hardware encoding is pretty much impossible. It's not parallelizable.



    Eh? There's plenty of realtime MPEG-2 1-pass encoding hardware cards out there. Consumer to Pro markets. I haven't really seen a usable hardware-accelerated H.264 encoding card for enthusiasts, for Windows, though.



    There's a great market for ripping DVDs to H.264 -- great quality at much less the space, your online digital library. Oh wait, it's illegal and that's the point of this thread ...Yeah, I'll leave it to Apple to deliver my sweetly-encoded H.264 DRM'ed to hell and back near-DVD-quality movie library.
  • Reply 64 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    It bears mentioning that REGION CODING was and is an utter disaster that neither helped DRM, nor users, made it a huge pain in the a55 for dvd drive makers, and region coding was hacked in like what, a few months/days?
  • Reply 65 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Apple's current iTunes DRM is a pretty good compromise as it is, though personally I am anti-DRM, I'd like to see purchase-able and rent-able movies from as many studios as possible available on iTunes Store. It will require some good negotiation skills on Apple's side, but I for one want it to happen and the studios need to realise that piracy exists, deal with it, you can make lots of money through Apple and iTunes, don't be jealous of iPod's runaway success, cash in on it - while being reasonable with Apple, of course....!
  • Reply 66 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core


    "Clearly there are leaks very high up the distribution chain."

    We should call it what it is, i.e., stealing



    "If the movie studios can't stop those then they need to accept that the piracy war is over and the pirates, as expected, have won."

    Are you suggesting the we should accept auto theft, drunk driving, sexually abuse or murder?



    "The only way to sell their content now is to make it easier and "cheaper" to obtain than an illegal copy."

    I can't think of anything that one could make easier and cheaper to obtain than an illegal copy?



    We don't need to "accept" drunk driving or what not. But it happens, and there are steps various authorities take to curtail it. Denying that it happens does not help prevent it.



    Same with movie piracy. There is a lot of rampant stealing and leaking of movies. Fact of life. Denying it won't help prevent it. As iTunes Music Store shows, make it available for fast download for reasonable pricing and decent quality, and there -- we can "fight the pirates" that way.



    "I can't think of anything that one could make easier and cheaper to obtain than an illegal copy?"

    In response, I would say, BitTorrent is 1. pain in the ass, 2. quality of movies is highly variable, 3. there's a lot of pr0n you have to wade through sometimes, 4. it takes a while with firewall settings and not flooding your DSL/ cable/ broadband connection, 5. some ISPs detect BitTorrent packets and block them or reduce their priority on the network, 6. Seeders that use like 20 .rar files are really annoying if just 1 rar file is corrupted and reseeded through the peers, and the whole movie seed needs to be "repacked"... There are many ways an illegal copy is more troublesome than good-karma legal downloads.
  • Reply 67 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Without admitting anything, let's just say I'm very close to just shelling out the AUD$25-30 (it shouldn't be that much...! How about AUD $15.99 ??!!!) for Fast&Furious: TokyoDrift.
  • Reply 68 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sunilraman


    Eh? There's plenty of realtime MPEG-2 1-pass encoding hardware cards out there. Consumer to Pro markets. I haven't really seen a usable hardware-accelerated H.264 encoding card for enthusiasts, for Windows, though.



    There's a great market for ripping DVDs to H.264 -- great quality at much less the space, your online digital library. Oh wait, it's illegal and that's the point of this thread ...Yeah, I'll leave it to Apple to deliver my sweetly-encoded H.264 DRM'ed to hell and back near-DVD-quality movie library.



    But MPEG 2 encoding is really easy to do. The chips you get to do that aren't doing anything special, they're just generic chips to offload a task from your processor. It's only done in hardware in that it's done in software on a chip other than your CPU.



    H.264 encoding is much to intensive to do that—the chip you would need to do it in real time would be almost as expensive as your CPU, if not more.



    (BTW, what I mean by "parallelizable," is that a lot of people think that anything can be made magically faster by putting it into "hardware." Well, this isn't the case with a lot of things—it's just that graphics in particular are incredibly adaptable to extreme parallelization, probably more so than any other computing task, period. Encoding is heavily branch dependent, therefore, specialized hardware doesn't help per se, except in the sense that offloading it frees up your CPU. Additionally, graphics cards aren't helpful at all for encoding—when people talk about "GPGPU" stuff, they're talking about playing to the graphics cards strengths, because that's all they can do.)
  • Reply 69 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gregmightdothat


    .... Additionally, graphics cards aren't helpful at all for encoding?when people talk about "GPGPU" stuff, they're talking about playing to the graphics cards strengths, because that's all they can do....



    Actually not really, there are cards marketed as "VIVO" - Video In Video Out that AFAIK allows you to capture your analog (composite or s-video) signals, and encode it. I'm not sure if it captures at MPEG2-on-the-fly or proprietary/other, then CPU-encoded later.



    I wonder what kind of gear Apple is using to encode all that music video, video, and film content in H.264 for iTunes Store --- surely it's not just a f*kload of Mac Pros in some big room somewhere in Cupertino? I mean, purely CPU encoding at Apple HQ?
  • Reply 70 of 72
    I personally wouldn't download movies on to a iPod. I like the quality of a DVD. The movie studios are just negotiating with Apple for more $. Microsoft pays Universal money for each Zune player sold and Universal has stated that they will negotiate with Apple on the same lines as "these devices are nothing but an encouragement to piracy".
  • Reply 71 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Apologies for cross-posting but I know a few members from different threads were interested in this.



    First off the block: Fujitsu reveals realtime hardware-encoding of H.264. Woot.

    http://www.fujitsu.com/global/news/p...061130-01.html



    Max res though is 1440 x 1080 , with 1920 x 1080 planned. 90nm LSI (large-scale integrated circuit).
  • Reply 72 of 72
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Above info thanks to hardmac.com who also recommends the x264 codec for H.264 encoding via quicktime, claims faster, better, more options, etc. Should be for OSX, Universal Binary, AFAIK. Link here: https://developer.berlios.de/projects/x264qtcodec/
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