arts school to be named after thug

Posted:
in AppleOutsider edited January 2014
BALTIMORE - Jada Pinkett Smith donated $1 million to the high school from which she graduated and asked that a theater there be dedicated to one of her classmates, Tupac Shakur.







full article:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061212/..._pinkett_smith



is she and this school insane? glorifying a thug like this?





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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 55
    The same Jada Pinkett Smith that thought she could become a Heavy Metal Queen?



    Yeesh. Stick with acting and being damn cute.



    As far as the Tupac thing, he was a prolific rapper. Though the thug image and attitude was the death of him.
  • Reply 2 of 55
    He was more than a "thug".



    If you knew more about him you might not say that.
  • Reply 3 of 55
    I'm sure the school could use the money, regardless of the motivation behind her request.
  • Reply 4 of 55
    In the Event of My Demise



    In the event of my Demise

    when my heart can beat no more

    I Hope I Die For A Principle

    or A Belief that I had Lived 4

    I will die Before My Time

    Because I feel the shadow's Depth

    so much I wanted 2 accomplish

    before I reached my Death

    I have come 2 grips with the possibility

    and wiped the last tear from My eyes

    I Loved All who were Positive

    In the event of my Demise



    - Tupak Shakur
  • Reply 5 of 55
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,454member
    If I were in charge of the school. I'd refuse the donation.



    Nick
  • Reply 6 of 55
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Since when is moral goodness something we expect of our artists? Do we only expect the black ones to be "good" people?
  • Reply 7 of 55
    Guys, this is in Baltimore. It's fitting for a school to be named after a thug in what's almost surely in the running for most corrupt city in America.
  • Reply 8 of 55
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,454member
    Who said anything about moral goodness? I'm sure people would have no problem with naming the school after Louis Armstrong a lifelong pothead or Ray Charles, longtime junkie.



    There is a big difference between being morally good and basically advocating a life of crime including killing and harming others.



    Advocate a little drug use... fund my school.

    Advocate a little extra-curricular sex, fund my school. You aren't harming anyone but yourself.



    Advocate a life where you take from, kill and hurt others... don't fund my school.



    Nick
  • Reply 9 of 55
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trumptman




    There is a big difference between being morally good and basically advocating a life of crime including killing and harming others.



    Nick



    Really? Because who has he killed? He's never been convicted of any violent crime.



    Even his 1993 sexual assault conviction was dicey and very suspect, and it shows as he was released almost 2 months after his 5 year sentence...
  • Reply 10 of 55
    I think trumptman's post was intended more as a generalism. Not all of us know much (or care much) about Tupac Shakur, but the value of this thread isn't about Tupac. It's about the supposition of funding a school in the name of a crook, and the varying degrees of Tupac's alleged crookedness are somewhat ancillary to the points that may be made.
  • Reply 11 of 55
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    I do not think trumptman's characterization of Tupac's work is fair or accurate. I would venture a guess that his familiarity with Tupac's work is extremely limited if it even exists at all.



    The level of Tupac's "crookedness" is entirely the point here. I will take it for granted that he is not a good moral character, but that is not a disqualifying characteristic for an artist receiving recognition and praise.



    I actually use Tupac's "Dear Mama" as an example when I do my personal narrative unit. It's a great song.

    Quote:

    You are appreciated



    When I was young me and my mama had beef / Seventeen years old kicked out on the streets

    Though back at the time, I never thought I'd see her face / Ain't a woman alive that could take my mama's place

    Suspended from school; and scared to go home, I was a fool / with the big boys, breakin all the rules

    I shed tears with my baby sister /Over the years we was poorer than the other little kids

    And even though we had different daddy's, the same drama / When things went wrong we'd blame mama

    I reminice on the stress I caused, it was hell / Huggin on my mama from a jail cell

    And who'd think in elementary? / Heeey! I see the penitentiary, one day

    And runnin from the police, that's right / Mama catch me, put a whoopin to my backside

    And even as a crack fiend, mama

    You always was a black queen, mama / I finally understand

    for a woman it ain't easy tryin to raise a man

    You always was committed / A poor single mother on welfare, tell me how ya did it

    There's no way I can pay you back / But the plan is to show you that I understand

    You are appreciated



    Lady, don'tcha know we love ya? Sweet lady

    Dear mama, place no one above ya, sweet lady

    You are appreciated, don'tcha know we love ya?



    Now ain't nobody tell us it was fair / No love from my daddy cause the coward wasn't there

    He passed away and I didn't cry, cause my anger / wouldn't let me feel for a stranger

    They say I'm wrong and I'm heartless, but all along / I was lookin for a father he was gone

    I hung around with the Thugs, and even though they sold drugs / they showed a young brother love

    I moved out and started really hangin / I needed money of my own so I started slangin

    I ain't guilty cause, even though I sell rocks / It feels good puttin money in your mailbox

    I love payin rent when the rent's due / I hope ya got the diamond necklace that I sent to you

    Cause when I was low you was there for me / and never left me alone because you cared for me

    And I could see you comin home after work late / You're in the kitchen tryin to fix us a hot plate

    Ya just workin with the scraps you was given / And mama made miracles every Thanksgivin

    But now the road got rough, you're alone / You're tryin to raise two bad kids on your own

    And there's no way I can pay you back / But my plan is to show you that I understand

    You are appreciated



    Pour out some liquor and I reminisce, cause through the drama / I can always depend on my mama

    And when it seems that I'm hopeless / You say the words that can get me back in focus

    When I was sick as a little kid / To keep me happy there's no limit to the things you did

    And all my childhood memories / Are full of all the sweet things you did for me

    And even though I act craaazy / I gotta thank the Lord that you made me

    There are no words that can express how I feel / You never kept a secret, always stayed real

    And I appreciate, how you raised me / And all the extra love that you gave me

    I wish I could take the pain away / If you can make it through the night there's a brighter day

    Everything will be alright if ya hold on / It's a struggle everyday, gotta roll on

    And there's no way I can pay you back/ but my plan is to show you that I understand



    You are appreciated



  • Reply 12 of 55
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,454member
    I believe Grove's example is proof that roses can grow in horse crap.



    Nick
  • Reply 13 of 55
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trumptman


    I believe Grove's example is proof that roses can grow in horse crap.



    Nick



    Hmm...



    Quote:

    Most of Shakur's songs are about growing up around violence and hardship in ghettos, racism, problems in society, and sometimes his feuds with fellow rappers. Shakur is known for the political, economic, and messages of racial equality found in much of his work.



    Quote:

    On April 17, 2003, Harvard University co-sponsored an academic symposium entitled "All Eyez on Me: Tupac Shakur and the Search for the Modern Folk Hero." The speakers discussed a wide range of topics dealing with Shakur's impact on everything from entertainment to sociology.[51]



    Quote:

    Many of the speakers discussed Shakur's status and public persona, including State University of New York English professor Mark Anthony Neal, who gave the talk "Thug Nigga Intellectual: Tupac as Celebrity Gramscian" in which he argued that Shakur was an example of the "organic intellectual" expressing the concerns of a larger group.



    Quote:

    At one Harvard Conference the theme was Shakur's impact on entertainment, race relations, politics and the "hero/martyr"



  • Reply 14 of 55
    macrrmacrr Posts: 488member
    Trump is prisoner to a stereo type.



    You say Tupac



    He hears Baby Got Back......



    heh.
  • Reply 15 of 55
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,454member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ShawnJ


    Hmm...





    I'll give Grove credit for at least citing a primary source. You cite an adoring fan who has written up his life for Wikipedia and declare the matter done.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacRR


    Trump is prisoner to a stereo type.



    You say Tupac



    He hears Baby Got Back......



    heh.



    I'd gladly prefer to hear Baby Got Back by Sir Mix-a-Lot. I much preferred rap as a social force and rap as a means to a good time as opposed to rapping egomaniacs who cap all suckaz for pleasure. Tupac got his wish in that the lifestyle he advertised was delivered to him. However I'd still rather listen to even him than the played out nonsense that passes for rap today. It is like a hair band in 1990. We are all waiting for the next real thing that will get rid of all the third cousins with record deals and pass for "rap" artists.



    Nick
  • Reply 16 of 55
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Rap with socially relevant lyrics still exists, and you are far more likely to find socially relevant rap than anything the rock genre is putting on the radio. Take a listen to Kanye West's "All Falls Down".
  • Reply 17 of 55
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trumptman


    I'll give Grove credit for at least citing a primary source.



    Utterly irrelevant.



    Are you disagreeing with the content or substance of what I quoted?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trumptman


    You cite an adoring fan who has written up his life for Wikipedia and declare the matter done.



    An "adoring fan?"



    That article has been edited thousands and thousands of times by all sorts of people.



    Address the substance please.
  • Reply 18 of 55
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by groverat


    Rap with socially relevant lyrics still exists, and you are far more likely to find socially relevant rap than anything the rock genre is putting on the radio. Take a listen to Kanye West's "All Falls Down".



    ...and



    Common

    Talib Kweli

    Fugees

    Lauryn Hill

    A Tribe Called Qwest

    De la soul

    Mos Def

    The Roots



    among others...
  • Reply 19 of 55
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    If kids want a genre that parents absolutely do not understand hip-hop is the only way to go, rock is dead in that sense. Rock music today is completely accessible to parents, because it's the same stuff the parents of modern teenagers listened to. The parents listened to more controversial, challenging, and intelligent rock than kids listen to today.



    What is controversial in rock?

    What does rock have to offer anyone? It is crap.



    The only decent rock-type music worth listening to comes from indie scenes.
  • Reply 20 of 55
    I'm so old school...these guys delivered "The Message" 24 years ago...







    Best beat ever.
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