Mac OS X key to Apple's consumer electronics strategy

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwyatt


    I loved my Newton, I can only hope that they resurrect.



    OMFG. You must be old. Really old.



    I remember seeing it once in my youth. It was expensive but looked cool, very cool indeed.
  • Reply 22 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Barabas


    OMFG. You must be old. Really old.



    I remember seeing it once in my youth. It was expensive but looked cool, very cool indeed.



    The Newton was only released in the mid to late 90's man I'm not that old (39)

    It used wireless (infrared) tech to send /receive input from other Newtons....sound familiar?



    Also one of the first with fairly robust hand writting recgonition (before palm)...fun product although not extremley useful and a bit bulky.



    Hell I still have an Apple made back-pack for a MAC SE, the first portable....now I'm dated.
  • Reply 23 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Clive At Five


    Not gonna happen. Sony has way too much baggage, and waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too big of a product line for Apple to handle. Digital cameras, game consoles, TVs... all things that Apple has had zero experience in.



    -Clive



    Digital cameras, camcorders, h-fi systems, TVs, these are all things that can benefit greatly with that Apple formula of simple, usable design and seamless integration with each other and your computer as well.



    Zero experience? So Apple just designed iPhoto, iDVD, iMovie, iTunes, iPod, and now iTV (not to mention their pro Apps) without knowing or learning anything about digital cameras, camcorders, hi-fi, and televisions?



    I agree, an Apple acquisition is a long shot. It will only happen if PS3 is a total flop and Sony has to hold a fire sale (bad choice of words considering the battery fiasco, eh?) and Apple gets to pick and choose from Sony's product lines.



    A strategic partnership is thus more likely. Sony needs Apple more than Apple needs Sony. And both of them know it. Sony knows they can't do shit for software. PS3 is Sony's last shot at maintaining their pre-eminence independently. Samsung and a resurgent Matsushita are breathing down their necks. They'd be smart to get something going with Apple. The price will be steep though. For Sony, that is. But when you're desperate, what choice do you have really?
  • Reply 24 of 67
    On my reading, parts of this article look and read as if they were taken from an Apple press release, the 3rd and 4th paras especially. I had no idea your sources were quite that good.
  • Reply 25 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwyatt


    The Newton was only released in the mid to late 90's man I'm not that old (39) It used wireless (infrared) tech to send /receive input from other Newtons....sound familiar?



    Also one of the first with fairly robust hand writting recgonition (before palm)...fun product although not extremley useful and a bit bulky.



    Lying somewhere in my living room I have an eMate. Considering its era, it's one of the most amazing machines Apple has ever produced: ultra-sturdy case, all flash memory, IR, PCMCIA slot, AppleTalk networking, lean and functional software. Foret the Zune anaolgy, too; I maintain that a pumped up version of the eMate, not a slimmed down traditional laptop, is the more appropriate inspiration for the Apple subnotebook that I read rumors about. Especially considering what the iPod has done for the price of flash memory. Just think of OS X (OS X Lite?) booting up at the push of a button....
  • Reply 26 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Splinemodel


    Whatever, this article is about embedded Mac OS X. . .



    If Apple were open with it (which they probably won't be) it could have a monstrous impact on the embedded industry. Right now, there is the embedded Linux camp and the WinCE camp. support for rich graphics has traditionally been the reason why people use WinCE at all. An embedded Mac OS X would tear into WinCE sales, and would likely bury Qtopia in the space of a year.



    In all honesty, I think embedded Mac OS X could come to dominate the smart phone market very quickly -- if Apple lets it free.



    And that is the key word, if Apple lets it free. The success of an Apple smart phone would probably depend on how proprietary Apple wants to make it. If it involves Apple only devices, at Apple no-rebate or discount prices and a Apple MVNO it's probably not going to attract much behind the most hardcore of the Mac elite. If they were to use a partner model and/or go through existing carriers and be more flexible with pricing and rebates, it might work. Overall, I see an Apple entry into the mobile market as a pretty big risk with not a large possible return.
  • Reply 27 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cincytee


    Lying somewhere in my living room I have an eMate. Considering its era, it's one of the most amazing machines Apple has ever produced: ultra-sturdy case, all flash memory, IR, PCMCIA slot, AppleTalk networking, lean and functional software. Foret the Zune anaolgy, too; I maintain that a pumped up version of the eMate, not a slimmed down traditional laptop, is the more appropriate inspiration for the Apple subnotebook that I read rumors about. Especially considering what the iPod has done for the price of flash memory. Just think of OS X (OS X Lite?) booting up at the push of a button....



    Ah, someone perhaps from my generation. Agreed, the e-mate was a nice little device.

    Combine a modern ultra portable + emate / Newton concepts + OSX = coool !
  • Reply 28 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider




    People familiar with the strategy tell AppleInsider that the Cupertino, Calif.-based company has been developing an operating system based on the core technologies of Mac OS X for use with embedded devices.



    [/url][/c]



    OS X should be quite able to be scaled down for embedded use. Linux does this exceptionally well, as does FreeBSD. m0n0wall, pfsense, freeNAS are all scaled down, powerful versions of FreeBSD.



    The advantage that OS X would have is the talent pool of Apple coders. Regardless of whether they open source this it will have a big impact.



    The other day I was in the Apple Store near where I live. I noticed the hand-held devices they were using to process orders. They had a built-in bar code scanner. They also communicated wirelessly with the store's POS system. The hardware was Symbol.



    I glanced at the screen on the hand-held device and there was an Apple icon in the center of the screen.



    Is this hand-held already running an embedded version of OS X?
  • Reply 29 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwyatt


    Hell I still have an Apple made back-pack for a MAC SE, the first portable....now I'm dated.



    I still have my Mac SE/30, I'm 47. It has an ethernet card (Farallon?) in it and so I thought I'd try and hook it up to the web the other day. I plugged the cable from my DSL modem into it and opened Navigator 3 and was surfing in full black and white! I just couldn't part with it.
  • Reply 30 of 67
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwyatt


    Ah, someone perhaps from my generation. Agreed, the e-mate was a nice little device.

    Combine a modern ultra portable + emate / Newton concepts + OSX = coool !



    Wouldn't this pretty much be a small form factor tablet or a sub-notebook with stylus input?



    The trouble with the Newton and eMate analogies is that those machines were necessarily constrained by the tech of the day. There's a sense that they were sort of magical (and for their day, they were) and if Apple could update the idea they would have a world beater.



    But once you move past pocket size nobody is interested, any more, in monochrome screens and scaled down apps and so so handwriting recognition-- you need to have a full on computer with modern amenities.



    Which would be an OS X machine. In a small form factor. With or without a keyboard. With wireless capacities, pen input, and a good screen. Maybe some accessory slots. No doubt killer design. Small tablet or sub-notebook, beautifully done.



    Which would be cool, but not the paradigm buster the Newton or eMate were.
  • Reply 31 of 67
    Would be cool if Apple adopted an electronic ink display for battery savings, reduced size and/or product flexibility.
  • Reply 32 of 67
    kolchakkolchak Posts: 1,398member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwyatt


    jaw-dropping device ? Here we go again !!



    No, no, you guys are reading it wrong. What they mean is Apple will be putting out software for dental practices. Now, spit.
  • Reply 33 of 67
    I believe the 'jaw-dropping' device is a handheld, 16:9 full surface touch screen phone, iPod, media player that also does Apple Remote Desktop and other OSX-things. It's described here:



    The Apple Concept Device
  • Reply 34 of 67
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BRussell


    Earth to Mr. Me: Everyone here on our planet uses 'iPhone' as a placeholder for an Apple cell phone.



    Everyone? Some of us know that the Apple cell phone is just a rumor--and, since yesterday, a severely discredited rumor. Others cannot accept that fact.
  • Reply 35 of 67
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me


    Everyone? Some of us know that the Apple cell phone is just a rumor--and, since yesterday, a severely discredited rumor. Others cannot accept that fact.



    You think because someone else released a cell phone, that means that Apple can't release one of their own? 'iPhone' is just the name people have been using for an Apple cell phone, whatever it ends up being called, and has no impact whatsoever on whether the rumors about an Apple cell phone are true. iTV is a British television network. Does that mean Apple won't release their set-top box? Come on, don't be afraid to use that cortex.
  • Reply 36 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me


    Everyone? Some of us know that the Apple cell phone is just a rumor--and, since yesterday, a severely discredited rumor. Others cannot accept that fact.





    Rumor my A__! I've been holding off way to long on a new cell phone for it to be a rumor...it's not, and I'm not in denial...I don't think.
  • Reply 37 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lantzn


    I still have my Mac SE/30, I'm 47. It has an ethernet card (Farallon?) in it and so I thought I'd try and hook it up to the web the other day. I plugged the cable from my DSL modem into it and opened Navigator 3 and was surfing in full black and white! I just couldn't part with it.





    I use mine as a clock on our mantle. Who remembers Moof the dogcow ??
  • Reply 38 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BRussell


    You think because someone else released a cell phone, that means that Apple can't release one of their own? 'iPhone' is just the name people have been using for an Apple cell phone, whatever it ends up being called, and has no impact whatsoever on whether the rumors about an Apple cell phone are true. iTV is a British television network. Does that mean Apple won't release their set-top box? Come on, don't be afraid to use that cortex.



    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the just announced iPhone is a VOIP phone, not a cell phone.
  • Reply 39 of 67
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Splinemodel


    In all honesty, I think embedded Mac OS X could come to dominate the smart phone market very quickly -- if Apple lets it free.



    Overtaking the OS used in pretty much every Nokia and Sony Ericsson phone that has over 75% of the market? Not likely.



    Kill off Embedded Linux in Asia where they don't like using proprietary OSs? Not likely.



    Kill of Embedded Windows/WinCE/Windows Mobile in ODM phones rebadged by carriers around the world as their own? Not likely.



    Kill of Palm. OK, That one's likely.
  • Reply 40 of 67
    plusplus Posts: 54member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davebarnes


    Clive,



    I don't see any ads on the Apple Insider website. Zero.

    Firefox 2 with Adblock reduces ads to almost nothing everywhere I surf.



    ,dave



    Yeah, for Firefox, Adblock (Plus?) is great. And then automagically populate Adblock's filter list by using the Filterset.G extension.



    Or, for Safari users (which I am, mostly), there's "Saft". Although one must populate the filter list for Saft manually, I've not found it to take that much work to obliterate all the ads from the sites I use regularly.



    Paul
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