Apple pushing for multi-touch trademark

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  • Reply 61 of 69
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TednDi View Post


    It used to be called the Queen's English.



    But that would probably be french.



    Non?



    French? The current line of English Royalty is mostly German.
  • Reply 62 of 69
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post


    Which happens to be English, American English is identified as different in many respects. England's English as you put it is NOT spoken by the smaller population.. Proper English is spoken in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and every other European country that speaks English as a second language.



    American English (which even has a separate dictionary) is not.



    Uh, the only point I was making was that over there, in England, the words may be different.



    I neither know, or care for the point of my earlier post.



    Here, in North America, those are the words used, even in most of Canada. At least in the times I've been there.
  • Reply 63 of 69
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post


    Which happens to be English, American English is identified as different in many respects. England's English as you put it is NOT spoken by the smaller population.. Proper English is spoken in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and every other European country that speaks English as a second language.



    American English (which even has a separate dictionary) is not.



    That's not really true. In almost every country where English is taught as a second language, such as China, and Russia, Brazil, etc, it's American English that's taught.



    In former Colonial countries, and Commonwealth countries, it's different. Though Canadian English has moved much more to the American, because of the proximity.
  • Reply 64 of 69
    tsvissertsvisser Posts: 36member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post


    Actually "Band Aid" is not a generic English term, it's a generic American term. The English term would be "plaster".



    Also in English, people don't use "elevators", they use "lifts" they don't "Xerox" anything, they "photocopy" things and we actually call Scotch tape (and most other brands of sticky tape) "Scellotape".



    Just thought I'd clear that up!





    Just another thought... both the English English and the non-tea drinking / tax paying English versions are sort of incorrect. Elevating and lifting are really only half of the function of elevators / lifts. Wouldn't it also be appropriate to call them descenders and lowers?
  • Reply 65 of 69
    spindriftspindrift Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    That's not really true. In almost every country where English is taught as a second language, such as China, and Russia, Brazil, etc, it's American English that's taught.



    Not true at all. I have Russian and Chinese friends who were both taught real English throughout their education. I can't vouch for Brazil.



    Brazil and perhaps one of two other exceptions does not constitute almost every country where English is taught. English is taught in all European countries as a second language. In fact, BBC English is even taught in many. That's just about as 'proper' as it gets.



    Anyway, I didn't mean to turn this into what it has become, I was originally just making a light hearted comment / dig at the differences between American and English.
  • Reply 66 of 69
    spindriftspindrift Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tsvisser View Post


    Just another thought... both the English English and the non-tea drinking / tax paying English versions are sort of incorrect. Elevating and lifting are really only half of the function of elevators / lifts. Wouldn't it also be appropriate to call them descenders and lowers?



  • Reply 67 of 69
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,508member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post


    Not true at all. I have Russian and Chinese friends who were both taught real English throughout their education. I can't vouch for Brazil.



    Brazil and perhaps one of two other exceptions does not constitute almost every country where English is taught. English is taught in all European countries as a second language. In fact, BBC English is even taught in many. That's just about as 'proper' as it gets.



    Anyway, I didn't mean to turn this into what it has become, I was originally just making a light hearted comment / dig at the differences between American and English.



    Well, I also have friends in that position who are here now from China, and I know a lot of Russians who live in my area. I have to disagree.



    There is no such thing as "real English". There is British English, and American English. They are both "real".



    The French are attempting to keep their language "real". Thankfully, neither the British or Americans are stupid enough to try that.
  • Reply 68 of 69
    spindriftspindrift Posts: 674member
    Removed reply so the thread does not drift any further off topic.
  • Reply 69 of 69
    there is nothing wrong with them trademarking it. apple are doing what is best for their company, and understandably dont want all manner of people popping up with competing 'multi-touch' products. theres no harm in trying, even if it gets rejected. people shouldnt be so quick to criticise such an excellent and successful company. apples shares have shot up, admittedly since they have been under the leadership of steve jobs. their tactic is pretty much trying to entirely annihilate the competitions chances, and rightfully so. they make excellent products, and the thing many criticis fail to do is provide a FAIR comparison, most of the time any comparison at all. they do marvellously well with their products, and, really, any comnpany has flaws, but ive never seen people jump at a company for any small imperfection more than at apple.
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